digest

noun
di·​gest | \ ˈdī-ˌjest How to pronounce digest (audio) \

Definition of digest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a summation or condensation of a body of information: such as
a : a systematic compilation of legal rules, statutes, or decisions
b : a periodical devoted to condensed versions of previously published articles
2 : a product of digestion

digest

verb
di·​gest | \ dī-ˈjest How to pronounce digest (audio) , də- \
digested; digesting; digests

Definition of digest (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to distribute or arrange systematically : classify
2 : to convert (food) into absorbable form
3 : to take into the mind or memory especially : to assimilate mentally
4a : to soften, decompose, or break down by heat and moisture or chemical action DNA digested by restriction enzymes
b : to extract soluble ingredients from by warming with a liquid
5 : to compress into a short summary
6 : absorb sense 2 the capacity of the U.S. to digest immigrants

intransitive verb

1 : to digest food
2 : to become digested

Keep scrolling for more

Examples of digest in a Sentence

Noun a digest of the laws a digest of yesterday's departmental meeting Verb He has trouble digesting certain foods. It will take me a while to digest this news.
See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Another great technique for hacking into the rest and digest response is to chew gum. John Hudson, Wired, "If You Are Going to Survive, You Must Prepare to Fail," 11 Jan. 2021 Joining a community, or even a Facebook group, can offer a place to debrief and digest after a trying conversation. NBC News, "How to talk to parents about race if you're adopted or multiracial," 22 Dec. 2020 Our Capital Letter email newsletter delivers a weekly digest on finance, business, and economics from an NR sensibility. Andrew Stuttaford, National Review, "The Capital Letter: Week of December 7," 12 Dec. 2020 Our Capital Letter email newsletter delivers a weekly digest on finance, business, and economics from an NR sensibility. Andrew Stuttaford, National Review, "The Capital Letter: Week of December 7," 12 Dec. 2020 Our Capital Letter email newsletter delivers a weekly digest on finance, business, and economics from an NR sensibility. Andrew Stuttaford, National Review, "The Capital Letter: Week of November 16," 21 Nov. 2020 Imprimis is the free monthly speech digest of Hillsdale College and is dedicated to educating citizens and promoting civil and religious liberty by covering cultural, economic, political, and educational issues. Arkansas Online, "OPINION | JAY BHATTACHARYA: A compassionate covid strategy," 15 Nov. 2020 Our Capital Letter email newsletter delivers a weekly digest on finance, business, and economics from an NR sensibility. Philip Cross, National Review, "Why a Wealth Tax Won’t Raise Revenues or Reduce Inequality," 3 Nov. 2020 Our Capital Letter email newsletter delivers a weekly digest on finance, business, and economics from an NR sensibility. Philip Cross, National Review, "Why a Wealth Tax Won’t Raise Revenues or Reduce Inequality," 3 Nov. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb This digestive issue results from an inability to fully digest lactose, according to the NIDDK. Melissa Matthews, SELF, "Grocery Diaries: A Mom Who's Into the Mediterranean Diet—With Some Flexibility," 5 Jan. 2021 By then, the people will have had time to digest the bizarre events of the annus horribilis — and with their votes make the necessary compensations. Victor Davis Hanson, National Review, "What Will Historians Make of Our Annus Horribilis?," 31 Dec. 2020 The rush frustrated rank-and-file lawmakers, who complained that the measure was just another in a long series of mammoth bills they were being asked to approve without adequate time to digest. Los Angeles Times, "Today’s Headlines: Congress’ big ‘Christmas tree’ bill," 22 Dec. 2020 Doing some light exercise after eating—like walking—is fine, but for a more intense workout your body needs time to digest. Jenny Mccoy, Glamour, "How Long Should You Wait to Workout After Eating?," 19 Nov. 2020 But companies face new costs and paperwork, including customs declarations and border checks, and will have to digest the new rules imposed by the trade deal. Saphora Smith, NBC News, "New era for Europe as U.K., E.U. complete Brexit separation," 1 Jan. 2021 Traders are struggling to digest the new rules imposed by a 1,200-page trade deal that was agreed just a week before split. Jill Lawless, chicagotribune.com, "Britain ends long Brexit journey with economic break from EU," 31 Dec. 2020 Businesses were scrambling Monday to digest the details and implications of the 1,240-page deal sealed by the EU and the U.K. on Christmas Eve. Fox News, "United Kingdom warns of 'bumpy moments' despite striking post-Brexit trade deal," 29 Dec. 2020 The archive looks like a metaphor for their relationship: Ed was cerebral, engaged in a systematic effort to digest all the art and music and literature in the Western world. Mary Norris, The New Yorker, "The Archives of an Unfulfilled Genius," 27 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'digest.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of digest

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for digest

Noun

Middle English, systematic arrangement of laws, from Latin digesta, from neuter plural of digestus, past participle of digerere to arrange, distribute, digest, from dis- + gerere to carry

Verb

Middle English, from Latin digestus

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about digest

Time Traveler for digest

Time Traveler

The first known use of digest was in the 14th century

See more words from the same century

Statistics for digest

Last Updated

17 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Digest.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/digest. Accessed 20 Jan. 2021.

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for digest

digest

noun
How to pronounce digest (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of digest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: information or a piece of writing that has been made shorter

digest

verb
How to pronounce digest (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of digest (Entry 2 of 2)

: to change (food that you have eaten) by a biological process into simpler forms that can be used by the body
: to think over and try to understand (news, information, etc.)

digest

noun
di·​gest | \ ˈdī-ˌjest How to pronounce digest (audio) \

Kids Definition of digest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: information in shortened form

digest

verb
di·​gest | \ dī-ˈjest How to pronounce digest (audio) , də- \
digested; digesting

Kids Definition of digest (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to change or become changed into simpler forms that can be used by the body digest a meal My dinner is still digesting.
2 : to think over and try to understand That's a lot of information to digest.

digest

noun
di·​gest | \ ˈdī-ˌjest How to pronounce digest (audio) \

Medical Definition of digest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a product of digestion
di·​gest | \ dī-ˈjest How to pronounce digest (audio) , də- How to pronounce digest (audio) \

Medical Definition of digest (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to convert (food) into absorbable form
2a : to soften, decompose, or break down by heat and moisture or chemicals
b : to extract soluble ingredients from by warming with a liquid

intransitive verb

1 : to digest food
2 : to become digested

Keep scrolling for more

digest

noun
di·​gest | \ ˈdī-ˌjest How to pronounce digest (audio) \

Legal Definition of digest

: a compilation of legal rules, statutes, or decisions systematically arranged

History and Etymology for digest

Latin digesta, from neuter plural of digestus, past participle of digerere to disperse, arrange

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on digest

What made you want to look up digest? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Words of Snow and Ice Quiz

  • image1037863653
  • Which of the following refers to thin, bending ice, or to the act of running over such ice?
True or False

Test your knowledge - and maybe learn something along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Typeshift

Anagram puzzles meet word search.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!