resume

verb
re·​sume | \ ri-ˈzüm How to pronounce resume (audio) \
resumed; resuming; resumes

Definition of resume

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to assume or take again : reoccupy resumed his seat by the fire …— Thomas Hardy When the break was over and I'd resumed my place on the stand, the teacher asked for a twenty-minute pose and gave me a stool.— Elizabeth Hollander
2 : to return to or begin (something) again after interruption She resumed her work. When official mourning was over, Soviet television resumed its normal pace.— Bel Kaufman Her face was changing, resuming its usual expression of gleeful malice.— Gail Carson Levine
3 : to take (something) back to oneself : reclaim If Waukeshaw Development fails to meet the requirements in the agreement, the town can foreclose on the property and resume ownership.— Shannon Keith
4 : to pick (something) up again : to go back to using or doing (something, such as a way of behaving) resume an old habit The very idea of resuming smoking is so loathsome that it drives the thought out of my head.— A. M. Rosenthal She soon got tired of him and banished him, resuming her way of living as a free spinster.— George Bernard Shaw After a quarter-century of creative silence, Goldschmidt resumed composing.— Norman Lebrecht

intransitive verb

: to begin again after a pause or interruption … emerged from the courthouse the day the trial resumed— Amy Waldman

résumé

noun
ré·​su·​mé | \ ˈre-zə-ˌmā How to pronounce résumé (audio) , ˌre-zə-ˈmā also ˈrā-zə-ˌmā or ˌrā-zə-ˈmā \
variants: or resume or less commonly resumé
plural résumés or resumes also resumés

Definition of résumé (Entry 2 of 2)

1 US
a : a short account of one's career and qualifications : curriculum vitae For the internship, I submitted my résumé, work samples, and a cover letter.— Tami Nguyen … a 90-minute telephone interview with a personnel manager at Intel, who has forwarded the resume to the hiring manager …— Hal Lancaster
b : a set of accomplishments a musical résumé [Lucy] Liu's artistic resume is an impressive one; her website displays sculptural works in wood, resin, and bronze, as well as embroidery, silkscreen, assemblage, a Jasper Johns-style deconstructed American flag, and more.— Emma Specter
2 formal : summary He gave a resume of the club's activities throughout the year.Farming Life … the business of the evening commenced with a resume of the events that had taken place over the summer.The Stourbridge (England) News

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Examples of resume in a Sentence

Verb The game resumed after the rain stopped. After the rain stopped, the teams resumed play. She sat down and resumed her work. He shook his visitor's hand and resumed his seat. I resumed my place at the podium. She will be resuming her position at the company. Noun If you would like to be considered for the job, please submit your résumé. His musical résumé includes performances at Carnegie Hall, a stint with the New York Philharmonic, and two Grammys. a brief résumé of the news
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb After being docked by the pandemic for more than a year, the U.S. cruise industry is gearing up to resume operations this summer. Kate Gibson, CBS News, 4 June 2021 The certificate was proposed in March by the bloc to resume safe international travel within the EU this summer. CNN, 2 June 2021 Earlier this week, President Joe Biden signed the Alaska Tourism Restoration Act into law, allowing cruise ships to bypass Canadian ports and resume the Alaska cruise season this summer. Cailey Rizzo, Travel + Leisure, 26 May 2021 Following action in Congress this week, some large cruise lines plan to resume sails to Alaska this summer, after the sector was shut down by COVID-19 last year. Alex Demarban, Anchorage Daily News, 21 May 2021 The Parking Authority of the River City will resume booting vehicles with three or more outstanding citations this summer, the group announced Monday. Mary Ramsey, The Courier-Journal, 3 May 2021 The incidents come as Iran negotiates with world powers in Vienna over Tehran and Washington returning to the 2015 nuclear deal, with talks due to resume Tuesday. Greg Norman, Fox News, 28 Apr. 2021 The incident comes as Iran negotiates with world powers in Vienna over Tehran and Washington returning to the 2015 nuclear deal, talks due to resume Tuesday. NBC News, 27 Apr. 2021 But with vaccinations underway, there’s hope among local festival organizers that conditions will be safe enough for mass gatherings to resume in some capacity this summer. From Usa Today Network And Wire Reports, USA TODAY, 22 Apr. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The letter should include the resident’s full name, address, contact information and a biography or resume. Megan Becka, cleveland, 11 June 2021 When charging overnight, the phone will stop charging at 80% and resume in time for your alarm. Chris Smith, BGR, 9 June 2021 Allonby’s resume is far more understated, yet impressive nonetheless. Brenton Howland, Forbes, 8 June 2021 Bumgarner’s heroic postseason resume would have been attractive to teams looking to bolster their rotation for October. John Shea, San Francisco Chronicle, 5 June 2021 Brown said those, coupled with the gas tax plan to improve highways, would give the governor an effective resume for reelection. Mike Cason | Mcason@al.com, al, 3 June 2021 Belloli’s resume included work as a curator for the Detroit Institute of Arts, the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, the San Diego Museum of Contemporary Art, the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston and the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis. Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times, 3 June 2021 Krzyzewski's resume is stacked with coaching awards, including three Naismith College Coach of the Year awards in 1989, 1992 and 1999. Zoe Christen Jones, CBS News, 2 June 2021 The biggest blemishes on Oregon’s resume are its two losses to Seattle, which came in its opening series of the season. James Crepea | The Oregonian/oregonlive, oregonlive, 30 May 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'resume.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of resume

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

1782, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for resume

Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French resumer, from Latin resumere, from re- + sumere to take up, take — more at consume

Noun

French résumé, from past participle of résumer to resume, summarize, from Middle French resumer

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Time Traveler for resume

Time Traveler

The first known use of resume was in the 15th century

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Statistics for resume

Last Updated

11 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Resume.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/resume. Accessed 12 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for resume

resume

verb

English Language Learners Definition of resume

 (Entry 1 of 2)

formal
: to begin again after stopping
: to take (a seat, place, position, etc.) again : to go back to (something)

résumé

noun

English Language Learners Definition of résumé (Entry 2 of 2)

: a short document describing your education, work history, etc., that you give an employer when you are applying for a job
: a list of achievements
formal : a short description of things that have happened

resume

verb
re·​sume | \ ri-ˈzüm How to pronounce resume (audio) \
resumed; resuming

Kids Definition of resume

1 : to begin again The teams resumed play.
2 : to take or occupy again Please resume your seats.

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