digest

noun
di·gest | \ˈdī-ˌjest \

Definition of digest 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a summation or condensation of a body of information: such as

a : a systematic compilation of legal rules, statutes, or decisions

b : a periodical devoted to condensed versions of previously published articles

2 : a product of digestion

digest

verb
di·gest | \dī-ˈjest, də-\

Definition of digest (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to distribute or arrange systematically : classify

2 : to convert (food) into absorbable form

3 : to take into the mind or memory especially : to assimilate mentally

4a : to soften, decompose, or break down by heat and moisture or chemical action DNA digested by restriction enzymes

b : to extract soluble ingredients from by warming with a liquid

5 : to compress into a short summary

6 : absorb sense 2 the capacity of the U.S. to digest immigrants

intransitive verb

1 : to digest food

2 : to become digested

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Examples of digest in a Sentence

Noun

a digest of the laws a digest of yesterday's departmental meeting

Verb

He has trouble digesting certain foods. It will take me a while to digest this news.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

According to Variety, however, one of the most visible programs will be Fox News’ daily digests, which will air in the morning and the afternoon, including on the weekends. Patricia Hernandez, The Verge, "Facebook’s first wave of ‘trustworthy’ news shows sure includes a lot of Fox News," 11 July 2018 Justinian’s commission discarded rules that were inefficient, obsolete, repetitive and confusingly overlapping, producing a much shorter new digest. F.h. Buckley, WSJ, "The ‘Swamp’ Needs a Justinian," 19 Apr. 2018 Jones followed Franklin’s every move in the digest-size magazine Jet. Jeff Maysh, Smithsonian, "The Counterfeit Queen of Soul," 28 June 2018 During a presentation to the county’s Board of Commissioners, finance director Maria Woods said Gwinnett’s net tax digest is expected to be nearly $30.8 billion in 2018, a 3.8 percent increase from 2017. Tyler Estep, ajc, "Gwinnett County millage rate unlikely to go up this year," 20 June 2018 Vox Sentences is your daily digest for what's happening in the world. Jennie Neufeld, Vox, "Vox Sentences: Battles in eastern Yemen endanger 250,000 civilians," 15 June 2018 The daily digest of trauma can weigh heavily on the spirit. Kimberly Mcallister, Teen Vogue, "Chloe x Halle Love Proving People Wrong," 14 June 2018 On Mondays, Aaron Reiss, one of The Star’s Mizzou beat writers, will offer a digest of thoughts on the Tigers and MU story lines to follow. Alex Schiffer, kansascity, "Mizzou Monday: A Jontay Porter return? Jordan Barnett in the NBA and more | The Kansas City Star," 21 May 2018 Easy-to-digest poems mesh best-guess conjecture, settled science and wry humor. Susan Faust, San Francisco Chronicle, "Roundup of new children’s books," 24 May 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

And diversity is always easier to digest when the team is winning. Angela Charlton, The Christian Science Monitor, "World Cup puts a different spotlight on immigration for European teams," 10 July 2018 The phone number was rapidly unraveled to its component parts, spliced and digested into a series of jokes, images and even puzzles designed to continue sharing the number while dodging Twitter’s censors. Laura Hudson, The Verge, "Was it right to dox Stephen Miller? That’s the wrong question," 27 June 2018 This amount of detail, and the decision to let it be optionally explored and digested by the player at their leisure, is impressive and contributes to crafting one of the most believable representations of a futuristic setting in recent memory. Patrick Shanley, The Hollywood Reporter, "'Detroit: Become Human' — Game Review," 24 May 2018 My administration continues to review and digest the Supreme Court decision overturning the 1992 Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act. Jessica Gresko, courant.com, "Supreme Court Makes Sports Betting A Possibility Nationwide," 14 May 2018 For a movie that plays, on its face, as something so simply digested, a further mulling reveals an invigorating jumble of ideas and moods. Richard Lawson, HWD, "In Spike Lee’s Invigorating BlacKkKlansman, the Real Joke Is on Us," 14 May 2018 Down the hallway, the Bruins were busy packing their bags and digesting the start of summer. Alex Prewitt, SI.com, "After a Dismal Series Start, Tampa Bay Quickly Regrouped to Reach Eastern Conference Final," 6 May 2018 Your basal metabolic rate, or resting metabolism, is the amount of energy or calories your body needs to perform basic functions like breathing and digesting food. Andrea Thelen, Ms, Detroit Free Press, "5 tips to rev up your metabolism," 30 Apr. 2018 The sheer volume of backstory provided here amounts to literary whiplash: Old family secrets and integral plot developments are presented in a single sentence and not even fully digested by the reader until several more pages have gone by. Tori Latham, The Atlantic, "The Epistolary Heart of An American Marriage," 7 Mar. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'digest.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of digest

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for digest

Noun

Middle English, systematic arrangement of laws, from Latin digesta, from neuter plural of digestus, past participle of digerere to arrange, distribute, digest, from dis- + gerere to carry

Verb

Middle English, from Latin digestus

Noun

Latin digesta, from neuter plural of digestus, past participle of digerere to disperse, arrange

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Time Traveler for digest

The first known use of digest was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for digest

digest

noun

English Language Learners Definition of digest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: information or a piece of writing that has been made shorter

digest

verb

English Language Learners Definition of digest (Entry 2 of 2)

: to change (food that you have eaten) by a biological process into simpler forms that can be used by the body

: to think over and try to understand (news, information, etc.)

digest

noun
di·gest | \ˈdī-ˌjest \

Kids Definition of digest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: information in shortened form

digest

verb
di·gest | \dī-ˈjest, də-\
digested; digesting

Kids Definition of digest (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to change or become changed into simpler forms that can be used by the body digest a meal My dinner is still digesting.

2 : to think over and try to understand That's a lot of information to digest.

digest

noun
di·gest | \ˈdī-ˌjest \

Medical Definition of digest 

(Entry 1 of 2)

: a product of digestion

di·gest | \dī-ˈjest, də- \

Medical Definition of digest (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to convert (food) into absorbable form

2a : to soften, decompose, or break down by heat and moisture or chemicals

b : to extract soluble ingredients from by warming with a liquid

intransitive verb

1 : to digest food

2 : to become digested

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digest

noun
di·gest | \ˈdī-ˌjest \

Legal Definition of digest 

: a compilation of legal rules, statutes, or decisions systematically arranged

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Comments on digest

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