clot

noun
\ ˈklät How to pronounce clot (audio) \

Definition of clot

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a portion of a substance adhering together in a thick nondescript mass (as of clay or gum)
2a : a roundish viscous lump formed by coagulation of a portion of liquid or by melting
b : a coagulated mass produced by clotting of blood
3 British : blockhead
4 : cluster, group a clot of spectators

clot

verb
clotted; clotting

Definition of clot (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to become a clot : form clots
2 : to undergo a sequence of complex chemical and physical reactions that results in conversion of fluid blood into a coagulated mass : coagulate

transitive verb

1 : to cause to form into or as if into a clot
2 : to fill with clots also : clog clotted streets

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Examples of clot in a Sentence

Noun We were told that his stroke was caused by a clot in his brain. a clot of daisies occupied one corner of the flower bed Verb medications that prevent blood from clotting substances that help to clot blood
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Cox — who later died from a pulmonary blood clot in December, a medical report said — claimed self-defense but the case was being investigated as a homicide. Ryan W. Miller, USA TODAY, "Police reviewing death of Lori Vallow's ex-husband after 'murder' comment in 2018 audio, reports say," 12 Nov. 2020 Sometimes patients get clot-busting drugs called thrombolytics, which carry their own risks. Joe Carlson, Star Tribune, "Work by Minnesota researchers reveals deadly combo: COVID and major heart attacks," 25 Oct. 2020 But Patel developed a blood clot that traveled to his heart, killing him on Sept. 10, Kenner police said. Michelle Hunter, NOLA.com, "Manslaughter charge for Texas man accused of attacking Kenner hotel owner in parking lot," 8 Feb. 2021 One of the most serious side effects of a COVID-19 infection is that blood clots can form, and sustained chest pain may indicate that a clot is causing a blockage or other serious danger in your arteries. Zee Krstic, Good Housekeeping, "How to Best Treat COVID-19 Symptoms at Home, According to Experts," 11 Jan. 2021 This includes infection, postpartum hemorrhage, a reaction to anesthesia, blood clot or surgical injury. Adrianna Rodriguez, USA TODAY, "Unnecessary C-sections are a problem in the US. Will publicizing hospital rates change that?," 21 Dec. 2020 The Maricopa County medical examiner determined his cause of death to be bilateral pulmonary thromboemboli, a condition in which one or more arteries in the lungs become blocked by a blood clot. Chloe Jones, The Arizona Republic, "Phoenix police reviewing death of Lori Vallow's 3rd ex-husband," 14 Nov. 2020 The biology of obesity includes impaired immunity, chronic inflammation, and blood that’s prone to clot, all of which can worsen COVID-19. Meredith Wadman, Science | AAAS, "Why COVID-19 is more deadly in people with obesity—even if they're young," 8 Sep. 2020 Receptionist Yolanda Potter, 53, developed a blood clot in her right leg. Laura Ungar, Star Tribune, "County moves to protect health staff after deadly outbreak," 4 Dec. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Because of her low platelet count, her blood was unable to clot. Shannon Shelton Miller, Glamour, "Black Women Who’ve Died in Childbirth Won’t Be Forgotten," 10 Nov. 2020 Certain treatments can lower the number of platelets (the cells that help your blood to clot and stop bleeding) in the blood. Korin Miller, Health.com, "Everyone's Talking About Mitch McConnell's Discolored Hand—Here Are 10 Things That Can Cause Discoloration," 23 Oct. 2020 Low blood oxygen caused by pneumonia can make the blood more likely to clot, the researchers said. Maggie Fox, CNN, "How coronavirus affects the entire body," 10 July 2020 His arterial line began to clot, suggesting coagulation problems that have been a hallmark of the disease. Tarena Lofton, CNN, "'Healthy' teenager who took precautions died suddenly of Covid-19," 19 June 2020 Weeds and tall grass clotted the site as deer and wild turkey roamed the grounds. Desperation Town, ProPublica, "Why a Struggling Rust Belt City Pinned Its Revival on a Self-Chilling Beverage Can," 11 May 2020 Recreate the experience at home with jam, clotted cream, scones, and of course, a hot pot of tea. Elizabeth Rhodes, Travel + Leisure, "How to Transform Your Home Into a Hotel Fit for a Queen This Mother's Day," 2 May 2020 The trailing point blade profile cleaves breasts with ease, and the G10 scales set into a machined stainless steel handle afford a sure grip when your other hand is clotted in pin feathers and blood. T. Edward Nickens, Field & Stream, "The Best Knives of SHOT Show 2020," 31 Jan. 2020 But sometimes, blood can clot abnormally and not dissolve properly—in that case, the clot can travel through blood vessels in the body up to the brain, heart, or lungs, and cause serious damage by blocking blood flow. Leah Groth, Health.com, "COVID-19 Is Causing Blood Clots and Strokes in Some Patients—but Doctors Don't Know Why," 27 Apr. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'clot.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of clot

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for clot

Noun

Middle English, from Old English clott; akin to Middle High German klōz lump, ball — more at clout

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Time Traveler for clot

Time Traveler

The first known use of clot was before the 12th century

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Statistics for clot

Last Updated

5 Mar 2021

Cite this Entry

“Clot.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/clot. Accessed 7 Mar. 2021.

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More Definitions for clot

clot

noun

English Language Learners Definition of clot

 (Entry 1 of 2)

British, informal : a stupid person

clot

verb

English Language Learners Definition of clot (Entry 2 of 2)

: to become thick and partly solid : to develop clots

clot

noun
\ ˈklät How to pronounce clot (audio) \

Kids Definition of clot

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a lump made by some substance getting thicker and sticking together a blood clot

clot

verb
clotted; clotting

Kids Definition of clot (Entry 2 of 2)

: to become thick and partly solid

clot

noun
\ ˈklät How to pronounce clot (audio) \

Medical Definition of clot

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a coagulated mass produced by clotting of blood

clot

verb
clotted; clotting

Medical Definition of clot (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to undergo a sequence of complex chemical and physical reactions that results in conversion of fluid blood into a coagulum and that involves shedding of blood, release of thromboplastin from blood platelets and injured tissues, inactivation of heparin by thromboplastin permitting calcium ions of the plasma to convert prothrombin to thrombin, interaction of thrombin with fibrinogen to form an insoluble fibrin network in which blood cells and plasma are trapped, and contraction of the network to squeeze out excess fluid : coagulate

transitive verb

: to cause to form into or as if into a clot

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More from Merriam-Webster on clot

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for clot

Nglish: Translation of clot for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of clot for Arabic Speakers

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