clot

noun
\ ˈklät How to pronounce clot (audio) \

Definition of clot

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a portion of a substance adhering together in a thick nondescript mass (as of clay or gum)
2a : a roundish viscous lump formed by coagulation of a portion of liquid or by melting
b : a coagulated mass produced by clotting of blood
3 British : blockhead
4 : cluster, group a clot of spectators

clot

verb
clotted; clotting

Definition of clot (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to become a clot : form clots
2 : to undergo a sequence of complex chemical and physical reactions that results in conversion of fluid blood into a coagulated mass : coagulate

transitive verb

1 : to cause to form into or as if into a clot
2 : to fill with clots also : clog clotted streets

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Examples of clot in a Sentence

Noun We were told that his stroke was caused by a clot in his brain. a clot of daisies occupied one corner of the flower bed Verb medications that prevent blood from clotting substances that help to clot blood
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Doctors discovered a massive pulmonary embolism, which is a blockage in the lung’s artery caused by blood clots. Hannah Drown, cleveland, "Avon Lake man survives health scare with 95 percent mortality rate at University Hospitals; The patient? My father," 31 Oct. 2019 Left tackle Russell Okung, who has been out all season recovering from a pulmonary embolism caused by blood clots, will make his season debut for the Chargers on Sunday at Chicago . . Matt Moore, BostonGlobe.com, "Patrick Mahomes," 24 Oct. 2019 Christopher, who is now 10, was exposed to radiation, contracted sepsis multiple times and suffered blood clots from the unnecessary treatments, the NBC station reports. NBC News, "A healthy boy went to hospitals 320 times, had 13 surgeries. His mom is heading to prison.," 12 Oct. 2019 Chris Bosh played for a team that would not let go of the rope even when he twice was sidelined by blood clots and eventually forced to retire. Ira Winderman, sun-sentinel.com, "Ex-Heat forward Chris Bosh can appreciate a Dolphins tank for ‘next Dan Marino’," 4 Oct. 2019 After the ultrasound came back clear, the team performed a CT scan that revealed several blood clots in both of her lungs, proving that Williams was right in diagnosing herself. Brianna Holt, Quartz, "Giving birth should not be a question of life or death for black women," 4 Oct. 2019 Venous thromboembolism Venous thromboembolism describes the dangerous phenomenon of having blood clots in your veins, the CDC explains. Patia Braithwaite, SELF, "11 Health Conditions You Should Know About If You’re Black and Pregnant," 30 July 2019 Former Toronto Raptors and Miami Heat star Chris Bosh had his career cut short by blood clots that developed into a pulmonary embolism on at least one occasion. Matt Velazquez, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Mirza Teletovic disputes report that pulmonary emboli will end his career," 28 Feb. 2018 Scott, making his second career start and first at left tackle, is filling in for Russell Okung, a two-time Pro Bowl selection who is out indefinitely because of blood clots. Jeff Miller, Los Angeles Times, "Chargers’ defense needs to get up to speed after a sluggish Week 1," 9 Sep. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb In addition to suffering from heart disease, her blood pooled and clotted because no one moved her. Christine Dempsey, courant.com, "Son charged with cruelty after neglect of dying mother in North Canaan, state police say," 17 Sep. 2019 That oversupply of unreliable words, clotting the discourse, feels awfully familiar, even if today most of them come at us electronically. Jesse Green, New York Times, "Review: In Central Park, a ‘Much Ado’ About Something Big," 11 June 2019 And, recently, getting a medical procedure to fix the access site for her needles, which had clotted with blood. Kaiser Health News, oregonlive.com, "Donald Trump wants more kidney patients on home dialysis; here’s the reality of what it’s like," 25 Aug. 2019 Since the 1980s, the French Room has been serving tea sandwiches along with scones, jams, clotted cream and desserts. Rebecca White, Dallas News, "The tea sandwich has returned, and it's modern and creative," 16 July 2019 Calcium allows your blood to clot and your muscles to contract in addition to keeping your bones healthy. Maggie O'neill, Health.com, "Taking Calcium and Vitamin D Supplements Together Could Increase Your Risk of Having a Stroke," 9 July 2019 When a flea bites into flesh, the body responds by clotting blood to prevent bleeding and promote healing. Quanta Magazine, "The Mutant Genes Behind the Black Death," 6 Oct. 2015 Her platelets — clotting cells within the blood — were dwindling. Kate Thayer, chicagotribune.com, "Save a life in the next few days. Red Cross asks for blood platelet donations amid Chicago shortage.," 26 June 2019 Experts aren’t totally sure why higher levels of estrogen may help with breakthrough bleeding, but one theory is that the hormone may help blood to clot better. Korin Miller, SELF, "Spotting on Birth Control? Here’s Why (and When to See a Doctor)," 17 Aug. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'clot.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of clot

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for clot

Noun

Middle English, from Old English clott; akin to Middle High German klōz lump, ball — more at clout

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Statistics for clot

Last Updated

16 Nov 2019

Time Traveler for clot

The first known use of clot was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for clot

clot

noun
How to pronounce clot (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of clot

 (Entry 1 of 2)

British, informal : a stupid person

clot

verb

English Language Learners Definition of clot (Entry 2 of 2)

: to become thick and partly solid : to develop clots

clot

noun
\ ˈklät How to pronounce clot (audio) \

Kids Definition of clot

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a lump made by some substance getting thicker and sticking together a blood clot

clot

verb
clotted; clotting

Kids Definition of clot (Entry 2 of 2)

: to become thick and partly solid

clot

noun
\ ˈklät How to pronounce clot (audio) \

Medical Definition of clot

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a coagulated mass produced by clotting of blood

clot

verb
clotted; clotting

Medical Definition of clot (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to undergo a sequence of complex chemical and physical reactions that results in conversion of fluid blood into a coagulum and that involves shedding of blood, release of thromboplastin from blood platelets and injured tissues, inactivation of heparin by thromboplastin permitting calcium ions of the plasma to convert prothrombin to thrombin, interaction of thrombin with fibrinogen to form an insoluble fibrin network in which blood cells and plasma are trapped, and contraction of the network to squeeze out excess fluid : coagulate

transitive verb

: to cause to form into or as if into a clot

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More from Merriam-Webster on clot

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for clot

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with clot

Spanish Central: Translation of clot

Nglish: Translation of clot for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of clot for Arabic Speakers

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