cluster

noun
clus·​ter | \ˈkləs-tər \

Definition of cluster 

(Entry 1 of 2)

: a number of similar things that occur together: such as

a : two or more consecutive consonants or vowels in a segment of speech

b : a group of buildings and especially houses built close together on a sizable tract in order to preserve open spaces larger than the individual yard for common recreation

c : an aggregation of stars or galaxies that appear close together in the sky and are gravitationally associated the Perseus cluster of galaxies

d : a larger than expected number of cases of disease (such as leukemia) occurring in a particular locality, group of people, or period of time

e : a number of computers networked together in order to function as a single computing system Consisting of groups of inexpensive machines cobbled together, clusters in many ways have supplanted traditional supercomputers.— Elizabeth K. Wilson

cluster

verb
clustered; clustering\ -​t(ə-​)riŋ \

Definition of cluster (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to collect into a cluster cluster the tents together

2 : to furnish with clusters the bridge was clustered with men and officers— Herman Wouk

intransitive verb

: to grow, assemble, or occur in a cluster they clustered around the fire

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Other Words from cluster

Noun

clustery \ -​t(ə-​)rē \ adjective

Examples of cluster in a Sentence

Noun

a cluster of cottages along the shore A small cluster of people had gathered at the scene of the accident.

Verb

The children clustered around the storyteller. the mice clustered together into a small burrow
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

This community cluster of Legionnaires’ disease cases is the second to emerge in the Washington Heights area in northern Manhattan. Melanie Grayce West, WSJ, "Legionnaires’ Disease Outbreak Kills One and Sickens 15 in Northern Manhattan," 11 Oct. 2018 There's so much mass in this region that the cluster is distorting light from objects behind it. Elizabeth Howell, Space.com, "Hubble Telescope Discovers a Light-Bending 'Einstein Ring' in Space," 10 Apr. 2018 The trippy circuit boards in Heiko Hellwig's Silicon Cities look like aerial views of futuristic urban clusters lit up at night. Laura Mallonee, WIRED, "Colorful Circuit Cities Built From Motherboards, Processors, and Microchips," 11 July 2018 Each of the boxes is designed with a sliding door that allow for easy access to the terraces and clusters of horizontal windows that look out onto the waves. Liz Stinson, Curbed, "Oceanfront modern house cascades down a rocky hill," 10 July 2018 As a result, the adult brain is composed of a mosaic of genetically distinct cell clusters. Robert Martone, Scientific American, "Early Life Experience: It’s in Your DNA," 10 July 2018 Here is a Substitute Family: a cluster of people—young and old, robust and infirm—whose hungers complement Willa’s own. Brad Leithauser, WSJ, "‘Clock Dance’ Review: The Family Maker," 6 July 2018 Taken together, the emergency messages went out far wider than Spring Valley, a cluster of 3,000 residents north of Highway 20. Lizzie Johnson, SFChronicle.com, "Proactive Pawnee Fire response in Lake County seeks to avoid another catastrophe," 25 June 2018 Along with an exploding winery business and Fredericksburg’s famed cluster of German restaurants and brew pubs, peaches and peach products (including ice cream, jams and pies) as well as berries and other fruits are a major driver of tourism. Lynn Brezosky, San Antonio Express-News, "Peach lovers rejoice: Hill Country having one of the best harvests in years," 25 May 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The party rode suburban discontent with Mr. Trump in districts clustered around major cities, capturing seats from Republicans in districts near Chicago, Denver, Kansas City, Miami, Philadelphia and Washington. Reid J. Epstein, WSJ, "Democrats Take Reins of House, Opening New Battlefields With Trump," 7 Nov. 2018 If possible, book one of the 1930s-era rooms clustered around a grass commons. Guy Trebay, Condé Nast Traveler, "In the Heart of Navajo Lands," 19 Oct. 2018 Strips of motels clustered together in offbeat places like Tucumcari, New Mexico, and many utilized the design styles and visual language of the day, blending neon signage, midcentury style, and occasionally, Polynesian and Native American themes. Patrick Sisson, Curbed, "Motel revivalism: How hipster hoteliers created a new roadside attraction," 22 June 2018 In the players’ lounge, dozens of competitors sat in seats clustered around a wall of three television sets that were tuned to the World Cup. Karen Crouse, New York Times, "Wimbledon Has a New Doubles Event: Tennis and the World Cup," 7 July 2018 As the hours passed and more seismic stations sent their data back to the scientists clustered around the computer, the team stayed late into the evening, releasing their analyses in a series of bulletins. Rachel Becker, The Verge, "Meet the scientists keeping a global watch for nuclear explosions," 9 May 2018 Nor, with the exception of migraine, which clustered with Tourette’s, major depression and ADHD, did neurological disorders show much correlation with psychiatric ones. The Economist, "A big collaboration is trying to understand diseases of the psyche," 28 June 2018 Construction has started on a new seven-story apartment building in the Metro Centre in Owings Mills, bringing the total number of apartments clustered there at 350. Meredith Cohn, baltimoresun.com, "Ground broken for next apartment building in the transit-oriented Owings Mills project," 20 June 2018 For example, data for two of the states with the highest prevalence—Maryland and Minnesota—come from small sampling areas clustered near a diagnostic center. Jessica Wright, Scientific American, "Autism Prevalence Jumps 16 Percent, CDC Says," 27 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cluster.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cluster

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for cluster

Noun

Middle English, from Old English clyster; akin to Old English clott clot

Verb

see cluster entry 1

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Statistics for cluster

Last Updated

13 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for cluster

The first known use of cluster was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for cluster

cluster

noun

English Language Learners Definition of cluster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a group of things or people that are close together

cluster

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cluster (Entry 2 of 2)

: to come together to form a group

cluster

noun
clus·​ter | \ˈklə-stər \

Kids Definition of cluster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a number of similar things growing or grouped closely together : bunch a cluster of houses a flower cluster

cluster

verb
clustered; clustering

Kids Definition of cluster (Entry 2 of 2)

: to grow, collect, or assemble in a bunch

cluster

noun
clus·​ter | \ˈkləs-tər \

Medical Definition of cluster 

: a larger than expected number of cases of disease (as leukemia) occurring in a particular locality, group of people, or period of time

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Comments on cluster

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