cluster

noun
clus·​ter | \ ˈklə-stər How to pronounce cluster (audio) \

Definition of cluster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a number of similar things that occur together: such as
a : two or more consecutive consonants or vowels in a segment of speech
b : a group of buildings and especially houses built close together on a sizable tract in order to preserve open spaces larger than the individual yard for common recreation
c : an aggregation of stars or galaxies that appear close together in the sky and are gravitationally associated the Perseus cluster of galaxies
d : a larger than expected number of cases of disease (such as leukemia) occurring in a particular locality, group of people, or period of time
e : a number of computers networked together in order to function as a single computing system Consisting of groups of inexpensive machines cobbled together, clusters in many ways have supplanted traditional supercomputers.— Elizabeth K. Wilson

cluster

verb
clustered; clustering\ ˈklə-​st(ə-​)riŋ How to pronounce clustering (audio) \

Definition of cluster (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to collect into a cluster cluster the tents together
2 : to furnish with clusters the bridge was clustered with men and officers— Herman Wouk

intransitive verb

: to grow, assemble, or occur in a cluster they clustered around the fire

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Other Words from cluster

Noun

clustery \ ˈklə-​st(ə-​)rē How to pronounce clustery (audio) \ adjective

Examples of cluster in a Sentence

Noun

a cluster of cottages along the shore A small cluster of people had gathered at the scene of the accident.

Verb

The children clustered around the storyteller. the mice clustered together into a small burrow
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Each shot captures distinct clusters of desert rose petals, shadows cast by wafer-thin overhangs, and wedges of azure sky. Julie Lasky, ELLE Decor, "ED First Look: The National Museum of Qatar," 26 Mar. 2019 That means that their energy states tend to break up from a continuous set (electrons have all energies within some range), to one with clusters. Chris Lee, Ars Technica, "Fractal structure produces fractal electrons with fractal energies," 2 Dec. 2018 Her lower waterline was accented with eye-enlarging white liner, and her bottom lashes were enhanced with individual clusters of false lashes. Marci Robin, Allure, "Kristen Stewart Chopped Off Her Hair and Bleached It Blonde Again," 16 Sep. 2018 One product specialist took special care to explain exactly how the engine performance would work on the Genesis Essentia to clusters of curious passersby. Tamara Warren, The Verge, "Monterey Car Week is where the past and future of automobiles collide," 29 Aug. 2018 The poor, of whatever colour, cluster in class enclaves. The Economist, "Half a century after Martin Luther King’s murder, America remains an unequal place," 4 Apr. 2018 Its ultimate 135,000-brake horsepower will be generated by two sources of power: a Rolls-Royce Eurofighter jet engine and a cluster of rockets from Norwegian aerospace company Nammo. Sean O'kane, The Verge, "Rocket car won’t break 1,000 miles per hour unless company raises $33 million," 15 Oct. 2018 Nobody knows where the top court is headed with this cluster of redistricting cases, though some analysts suggest that alleged racial discrimination might be easier to remedy than discrimination based on party affiliation alone. Allie Morris, San Antonio Express-News, "Top court to take up racial question in Texas redistricting case," 22 Apr. 2018 Cutler-Plotkin Jewish Heritage Center Cutler-Plotkin Jewish Heritage Center: From 1922 to 1949, this cluster of white buildings at First and Culver streets was home of Congregation Beth Israel. azcentral, "From climate to fry bread, 125 reasons to love Arizona," 15 May 2015

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

From 2009, just before the draft: About a dozen of the top picks in tonight’s draft are all staying at the same Westin hotel in midtown New York, so a number of basketball fans have clustered outside the lobby for autographs. Scott Fowler, charlotteobserver, "In 2009, Stephen Curry had NBA draft destination in mind, and it wasn't Golden State," 18 June 2018 And our society is getting more clustered in metropolitan areas. John Carlisle, Detroit Free Press, "John Carlisle: Many are answering the call of the wild in the U.P.," 18 Aug. 2014 In Hungary, there were four families with multiple members buried in the cemetery and clustered together; Italy had three families. John Timmer, Ars Technica, "Using Medieval DNA to track the barbarian spread into Italy," 14 Sep. 2018 The Delos security team looking for the hosts and finds them on the park's GPS, clustered together. Kayleigh Roberts, Marie Claire, "The 8 Biggest Questions After 'Westworld' Season 2, Episode 1," 23 Apr. 2018 There are several ways to look at segregation: by isolation, defined as the degree to which ethnic groups are clustered together, or by dissimilarity, defined as how evenly two groups are spread across an area. Kendra Pierre-louis, New York Times, "Dr. King Said Segregation Harms Us All. Environmental Research Shows He Was Right.," 3 Apr. 2018 There, a handful of moms sit clustered on splintering wooden bleachers watching their daughters, ages 9 to 12, play softball. Kate Morgan, Woman's Day, "A New Jersey Softball Team Is Lifting Its City's Spirits," 21 Mar. 2019 On Tuesday, nine Vox Media staffers clustered around the screen where the World Cup semi-final between France and Belgium was playing out. Rachel Becker, The Verge, "How watching the World Cup final might affect your health," 14 July 2018 Charlie Chaplins and Clara Bows clustered around the pool once again; Bart Lytton attended dressed as a devil. Lesley M.m. Blume, Town & Country, "Inside Frank Gehry's Overhaul of Garden of Allah, L.A.’s Most Infamous Corner," 25 Feb. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cluster.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cluster

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for cluster

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Old English clyster; akin to Old English clott clot

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Statistics for cluster

Last Updated

15 May 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for cluster

The first known use of cluster was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for cluster

cluster

noun

English Language Learners Definition of cluster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a group of things or people that are close together

cluster

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cluster (Entry 2 of 2)

: to come together to form a group

cluster

noun
clus·​ter | \ ˈklə-stər How to pronounce cluster (audio) \

Kids Definition of cluster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a number of similar things growing or grouped closely together : bunch a cluster of houses a flower cluster

cluster

verb
clustered; clustering

Kids Definition of cluster (Entry 2 of 2)

: to grow, collect, or assemble in a bunch

cluster

noun
clus·​ter | \ ˈkləs-tər How to pronounce cluster (audio) \

Medical Definition of cluster

: a larger than expected number of cases of disease (as leukemia) occurring in a particular locality, group of people, or period of time

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Comments on cluster

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