cluster

noun
clus·​ter | \ ˈklə-stər How to pronounce cluster (audio) \

Definition of cluster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a number of similar things that occur together: such as
a : two or more consecutive consonants or vowels in a segment of speech
b : a group of buildings and especially houses built close together on a sizable tract in order to preserve open spaces larger than the individual yard for common recreation
c : an aggregation of stars or galaxies that appear close together in the sky and are gravitationally associated the Perseus cluster of galaxies
d : a larger than expected number of cases of disease (such as leukemia) occurring in a particular locality, group of people, or period of time
e : a number of computers networked together in order to function as a single computing system Consisting of groups of inexpensive machines cobbled together, clusters in many ways have supplanted traditional supercomputers.— Elizabeth K. Wilson

cluster

verb
clustered; clustering\ ˈklə-​st(ə-​)riŋ How to pronounce clustering (audio) \

Definition of cluster (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to collect into a cluster cluster the tents together
2 : to furnish with clusters the bridge was clustered with men and officers— Herman Wouk

intransitive verb

: to grow, assemble, or occur in a cluster they clustered around the fire

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Other Words from cluster

Noun

clustery \ ˈklə-​st(ə-​)rē How to pronounce clustery (audio) \ adjective

Examples of cluster in a Sentence

Noun a cluster of cottages along the shore A small cluster of people had gathered at the scene of the accident. Verb The children clustered around the storyteller. the mice clustered together into a small burrow
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun This Friday, Venus will be visible near a cluster of stars called the Pleiades or the Seven Sisters, according to Alan MacRobert at Sky & Telescope. Theresa Machemer, Smithsonian Magazine, "April’s Super ‘Pink’ Moon Will Be the Brightest Full Moon of 2020," 30 Mar. 2020 Suburban New Rochelle soon was locked down by a cluster of cases. John Branch, New York Times, "They Celebrated Basketball and a Birthday. Then Came Coronavirus.," 28 Mar. 2020 That’s what happened in the Seattle area, which emerged as a coronavirus hot spot after a cluster of cases were identified at a nursing facility there. Lauren Caruba, ExpressNews.com, "San Antonio has more than 100 coronavirus cases. The actual number is likely higher.," 27 Mar. 2020 At the same time, his lab was sequencing a small cluster of cases in the city of Santa Clara in Silicon Valley. Elizabeth Weise, USA TODAY, "8 strains of the coronavirus are circling the globe. Here's what clues they're giving scientists.," 27 Mar. 2020 The area has a cluster of medical device makers and has other companies that, experts say, can easily shift to churning out medical supplies, including ventilators. Dallas News, "Companies in El Paso-Juarez gear up to manufacture medical supplies," 24 Mar. 2020 Pennsylvania is home to large clusters of warehouses and distribution centers, and serves as a major lane for freight moving through the East Coast and the Midwest. Jennifer Smith, WSJ, "Truckers Facing Coronavirus Hurdles in Keeping Supply Chains Moving," 18 Mar. 2020 In South Korea, infections surged over a 10-day span in late February when a cluster of a few dozen cases mushroomed into more than 5,000. Teo Armus, Washington Post, "Live updates: Growing coronavirus quarantines upend life globally; Asian markets stabilize after Dow falls 3,000 points," 17 Mar. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Factors like drought can also cause vectors to cluster around water sources alongside of animals, leading to further mixing and further possibilities for new diseases spread in vectors. Amanda Morris, azcentral, "Coronavirus won't be the last outbreak. Climate change, waning habitat will drive disease," 30 Mar. 2020 For the homebound, any health setback might mean a trip to the emergency room, which for the aide means a marathon wait in the place where the virus is most clustered. John Leland, New York Times, "She Had to Choose: Her Epileptic Patient or Her 7-Year-Old Daughter," 22 Mar. 2020 All that carbon dioxide clustered within the juice bottle could trigger an explosion in your fridge, Wilson says, though the balloon can relieve pressure within the container. Molly Glick, Popular Science, "Teen bootleggers are making dangerous booze on TikTok," 10 Mar. 2020 As Trump mingled with the supporters, his protective detail, dressed in suits and earpieces, clustered tightly around him, with one holding open the door of the presidential limousine nearby in case of an attack. David Nakamura, Anchorage Daily News, "Secret Service faces unique challenge of protecting Trump from coronavirus exposure," 10 Mar. 2020 His fans, clustered nearby, cheered on their leader. Jay Nordlinger, National Review, "Against the Populist Passions: A Visit with Enrique Krauze, Part II," 6 Mar. 2020 These data have to be manually sorted and clustered by type before one can even design an algorithm. Cassandra Willyard, Scientific American, "Can AI Fix Electronic Medical Records?," 1 Feb. 2020 All eyes will be on Iowa this Monday as voters cluster in school gymnasiums and churches around the state to kick off the months-long process of selecting a Democratic nominee for president. Marisa Kabas, The New Republic, "The Panic of the Never Trumpers," 31 Jan. 2020 Business boosters said that the project’s 6 million square feet of office space, clustered near a BART station, could become a tech hub perfectly positioned to capture overflow from San Francisco and Silicon Valley. J.k. Dineen, SFChronicle.com, "Bay Area’s largest planned housing project could die due to union fight," 8 Jan. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cluster.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cluster

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for cluster

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Old English clyster; akin to Old English clott clot

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Time Traveler for cluster

Time Traveler

The first known use of cluster was before the 12th century

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Statistics for cluster

Last Updated

2 Apr 2020

Cite this Entry

“Cluster.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cluster. Accessed 8 Apr. 2020.

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More Definitions for cluster

cluster

noun
How to pronounce cluster (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of cluster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a group of things or people that are close together

cluster

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cluster (Entry 2 of 2)

: to come together to form a group

cluster

noun
clus·​ter | \ ˈklə-stər How to pronounce cluster (audio) \

Kids Definition of cluster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a number of similar things growing or grouped closely together : bunch a cluster of houses a flower cluster

cluster

verb
clustered; clustering

Kids Definition of cluster (Entry 2 of 2)

: to grow, collect, or assemble in a bunch

cluster

noun
clus·​ter | \ ˈkləs-tər How to pronounce cluster (audio) \

Medical Definition of cluster

: a larger than expected number of cases of disease (as leukemia) occurring in a particular locality, group of people, or period of time

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