cluster

noun
clus·​ter | \ ˈklə-stər How to pronounce cluster (audio) \

Definition of cluster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a number of similar things that occur together: such as
a : two or more consecutive consonants or vowels in a segment of speech
b : a group of buildings and especially houses built close together on a sizable tract in order to preserve open spaces larger than the individual yard for common recreation
c : an aggregation of stars or galaxies that appear close together in the sky and are gravitationally associated the Perseus cluster of galaxies
d : a larger than expected number of cases of disease (such as leukemia) occurring in a particular locality, group of people, or period of time
e : a number of computers networked together in order to function as a single computing system Consisting of groups of inexpensive machines cobbled together, clusters in many ways have supplanted traditional supercomputers.— Elizabeth K. Wilson

cluster

verb
clustered; clustering\ ˈklə-​st(ə-​)riŋ How to pronounce clustering (audio) \

Definition of cluster (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to collect into a cluster cluster the tents together
2 : to furnish with clusters the bridge was clustered with men and officers— Herman Wouk

intransitive verb

: to grow, assemble, or occur in a cluster they clustered around the fire

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Other Words from cluster

Noun

clustery \ ˈklə-​st(ə-​)rē How to pronounce clustery (audio) \ adjective

Examples of cluster in a Sentence

Noun

a cluster of cottages along the shore A small cluster of people had gathered at the scene of the accident.

Verb

The children clustered around the storyteller. the mice clustered together into a small burrow
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Arriving at Lavrio, an old factory town near Athens, residents form a welcome cluster next to a seafront cafe. Washington Post, "Greek election front runner keeps campaign unusually low-key," 5 July 2019 The team modified the drug for a slow release across several weeks, targeting tissue in the spleen, bone marrow and brain where latent HIV reservoirs, or clusters of inactive HIV cells, were likely to occur. Scottie Andrew And Saeed Ahmed, CNN, "Researchers eliminated HIV from the DNA of infected mice. It's the first step toward a cure for humans, they say," 2 July 2019 On a map, the outbreak pattern is made up of erratic clusters throughout the region rather than a cohesive web of cases. Emily Baumgaertner, latimes.com, "As Ebola outbreak rages, the world just watches. Some call it 'malignant neglect'," 2 July 2019 Greenwold had been chatting in a loose cluster beside us, but overheard Anya and turned to her with alarm. Matthew Klam, The New Yorker, "The Weird, Violent, Uplifting Paintings of Mark Greenwold," 26 June 2019 On paper, that particular cluster appears to be one of the strongest, if not the most potent, in the entire field. Ted Dunnam, Houston Chronicle, "7-on-7 state football: Clear Springs lodged in top-tier pool," 25 June 2019 The new study, published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, focused on a temperate species of coral collected off Rhode Island, one that builds small clusters no larger than a human fist. Jenny Howard, National Geographic, "These corals choose to eat plastic over food," 25 June 2019 The moon scoots below and to the right of M-44 the Pleiades star cluster on Saturday before dawn. Arnold Pearlstein, sun-sentinel.com, "The Stars This Week: June 23-29," 23 June 2019 Loneliness has gotten much media attention lately, from seniors living alone to young people living anonymously in big urban clusters. Sara Miller Llana, The Christian Science Monitor, "Want to live in the city? Try buying a house with five friends.," 12 June 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

But in this case, Tintoretto has breathed air into his giant vision, clustered his figures into meaningful groups and structured the whole thing around a series of diagonals that converge on Christ on the cross. Washington Post, "Seeing Tintoretto is Venice is very nice. But so is seeing his works in a well-lit museum.," 27 June 2019 This allows for high-volume training while also clustering the sets close enough together to trigger changes in the hormones that help muscle growth. K. Aleisha Fetters, Outside Online, "The Beginner's Guide to Weight Lifting," 19 June 2019 The lineups were randomly decided in a process engineered by the Democratic National Committee to avoid clustering the top-tier candidates in a single night. New York Times, "The Democratic Debate Lineups Are Set. Here’s What to Expect.," 14 June 2019 At the end of the class visit, students flocked to the front of the room and clustered around Boisjoly. Patty Limerick, The Denver Post, "Limerick: Introducing two heroes — Kendrick Castillo and Roger Boisjoly — who need no introduction," 14 June 2019 Meanwhile, residents from Encanto and other southeastern San Diego communities said the city is violating state and federal fair-housing laws by clustering low-income housing in their communities, according to the Union-Tribune’s Jeff McDonald. San Diego Union-Tribune, "Column: Recent housing, homeless developments give little cause for optimism," 7 June 2019 The neighborhood centers, which are spread unevenly over seven of the 10 villages, date back to a desire to cluster schools, day cares, pools, stores and other amenities together. Jean Marbella, baltimoresun.com, "Columbia faces losing some of its neighborhood centers, and some say, its heart," 16 Apr. 2018 Three towering tiers of joy, rosettes clustered in filigreed buttercream bouquets. Laura Reiley, Washington Post, "Couples are opting out of wedding cakes for more distinctive sweets.," 19 June 2019 From Vanuatu to Brussels, throngs of students gathered, waving signs, singing and yelling chants, and clustering together in a coordinated attempt to express their concern to those who have the power to address the issue. Alejandra Borunda, National Geographic, "Kids striking against climate change: 'We're fighting for our lives'," 15 Mar. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cluster.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cluster

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for cluster

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Old English clyster; akin to Old English clott clot

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Statistics for cluster

Last Updated

10 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for cluster

The first known use of cluster was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for cluster

cluster

noun

English Language Learners Definition of cluster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a group of things or people that are close together

cluster

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cluster (Entry 2 of 2)

: to come together to form a group

cluster

noun
clus·​ter | \ ˈklə-stər How to pronounce cluster (audio) \

Kids Definition of cluster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a number of similar things growing or grouped closely together : bunch a cluster of houses a flower cluster

cluster

verb
clustered; clustering

Kids Definition of cluster (Entry 2 of 2)

: to grow, collect, or assemble in a bunch

cluster

noun
clus·​ter | \ ˈkləs-tər How to pronounce cluster (audio) \

Medical Definition of cluster

: a larger than expected number of cases of disease (as leukemia) occurring in a particular locality, group of people, or period of time

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Comments on cluster

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