bluster

verb
blus·​ter | \ ˈblə-stər \
blustered; blustering\ ˈblə-​st(ə-​)riŋ \

Definition of bluster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to talk or act with noisy swaggering threats brags and blusters but rarely does what he says he'll do
2a : to blow in stormy noisy gusts a cold, blustering wind
b : to be windy and boisterous … when autumn blusters and the orchard rocks.— Robert Browning

transitive verb

1 : to utter with noisy self-assertiveness "I don't want to hear it!" he blustered.
2 : to drive or force by blustering … trying to bluster us into the belief that they are much better than they look.— F. A. Swinnerton

bluster

noun

Definition of bluster (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a violent boisterous blowing … the strong breeze driving them was setting up a bluster on the water.— Rose Thurburn
2 : violent commotion They do their work without bluster or ostentation.— Stanley Walker
3 : loudly boastful or threatening speech growing tired of his macho bluster

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Other Words from bluster

Verb

blusterer \ ˈblə-​stər-​ər \ noun

Noun

blusterous \ ˈblə-​st(ə-​)rəs \ adjective
blustery \ ˈblə-​st(ə-​)rē \ adjective

Examples of bluster in a Sentence

Verb

He brags and blusters, but he never really does what he says he'll do. “I don't want to hear it!” he blustered. The wind blustered through the valley.

Noun

We were all tired of his macho bluster. all the bluster in the campaign speech was intended to hide a lack of specifics
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Abraham Lincoln even made an appearance, as did George Washington, each of them blustering about the foundations of this country. Rebecca Farley, refinery29.com, "The Bachelorette Wants To Have Its Cake & Be Political, Too," 3 July 2018 And with that, Mai blustered through the mob with security on her tail. Bianca Alysse, Billboard, "Ella Mai Wins New York City Over With Her Enchanting Concert at S.O.B.'s," 16 May 2018 During the same period, my stepmother got breast cancer, my mother-in-law had brain surgery, and Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un blustered on about nuclear war. Jake Halpern, WSJ, "Drip, Drip: Why We Sweat the Small Stuff," 17 Apr. 2018 During the kids' first week back in school, a late-summer wind blustered up. Logan Ward, Popular Mechanics, "How to Build a Treehouse in the Backyard," 20 Mar. 2017 In another post, Mira Rapp-Hooper looked at five takeaways from Trump’s blustering rhetoric on North Korea. Elizabeth N. Saunders, Washington Post, "Five things Trump did on his summer vacation: A foreign policy roundup," 4 Sep. 2017 While candidate Trump blustered about scrapping the nuclear deal altogether, his administration has been compelled to shy away from such drastic unilateral action. Ishaan Tharoor, Washington Post, "The U.S. and Iran are heading toward crisis," 19 July 2017 As Dexter Filkins recently wrote, in , some officials fear that Trump will bluster about terrorism in public but privately delegate strategy to the military. David Rohde, The New Yorker, "What Donald Trump Can Do to Help Stop Terrorism: Talk Less," 4 June 2017 But this long work gets bogged down with heavy-handed comedic episodes that last too long, mostly involving the crude, blustering Baron Ochs, a cousin of the Marschallin. Anthony Tommasini, New York Times, "Review: Renée Fleming’s Poignant Farewell to ‘Der Rosenkavalier’," 14 Apr. 2017

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

From the outset, the prospect of a high-stakes face-to-face between these leaders had reinvigorated diplomacy — creating space for high-level talks, smoothing the release of US hostages, and generally substituting planning for bluster. Evan Horowitz, BostonGlobe.com, "Trump canceled the North Korea summit. Here’s what it means," 24 May 2018 Ivanka’s stock went up, and she was widely perceived as someone who could tailor her father’s bluster into a message that younger women, moderates, and independents could get behind. Celeste Katz, Glamour, "Ivanka Trump's Curious Absence From the Midterm Campaign Trail," 29 Oct. 2018 The gambler Winston Churchill took chances in 1940, albeit rational ones backed by educated guesses that, for all Hitler’s bluster, the Third Reich had neither the air nor sea power to destroy the Anglosphere. Victor Davis Hanson, New York Times, "When to Wage War, and How to Win: A Guide," 20 Apr. 2018 James Lebovic explained why Trump’s toughness on the Iran nuclear deal (and by extension, his bluster toward Trudeau) wouldn’t necessarily affect North Korea. Elizabeth N. Saunders, Washington Post, "Trump and Kim will finally meet, but don’t expect much to change. Here’s why.," 11 June 2018 China has more to lose in a trade war despite its bluster about not negotiating. Mark Louchheim, WSJ, "Trump Is Right About China Trade," 2 Oct. 2018 But as a specific allegation, the collusion charge is bluster. Adi Robertson, The Verge, "Trump keeps threatening tech companies, but he’s terrible at following through," 29 Aug. 2018 For all their bluster, her Brexiteer critics couldn’t muster the 48 votes necessary to trigger a vote of no confidence in the prime minister, let alone the 159 necessary to defeat her. The Economist, "What doesn’t kill her makes Theresa May stronger," 12 July 2018 For all his oratorical bluster, Migration Policy Institute president Andrew Selee writes at Foreign Policy, López Obrador is really more pragmatic than ideological. Jonah Shepp, Daily Intelligencer, "AMLO Isn’t Mexico’s Trump – Nor Is He Trump’s Natural Enemy," 5 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bluster.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of bluster

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

1582, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for bluster

Verb and Noun

Middle English blustren, probably from Middle Low German blüsteren

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Time Traveler for bluster

The first known use of bluster was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for bluster

bluster

verb

English Language Learners Definition of bluster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to speak in a loud and aggressive or threatening way

of wind : to blow loudly and violently

bluster

noun

English Language Learners Definition of bluster (Entry 2 of 2)

: words that are loud and aggressive

bluster

verb
blus·​ter | \ ˈblə-stər \
blustered; blustering

Kids Definition of bluster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to talk or act in a noisy boastful way
2 : to blow hard and noisily strong winds blustering

bluster

noun

Kids Definition of bluster (Entry 2 of 2)

: noisy violent action or speech

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More from Merriam-Webster on bluster

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with bluster

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for bluster

Spanish Central: Translation of bluster

Nglish: Translation of bluster for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of bluster for Arabic Speakers

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