bluster

verb
blus·​ter | \ ˈblə-stər How to pronounce bluster (audio) \
blustered; blustering\ ˈblə-​st(ə-​)riŋ How to pronounce bluster (audio) \

Definition of bluster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to talk or act with noisy swaggering threats brags and blusters but rarely does what he says he'll do
2a : to blow in stormy noisy gusts a cold, blustering wind
b : to be windy and boisterous … when autumn blusters and the orchard rocks.— Robert Browning

transitive verb

1 : to utter with noisy self-assertiveness "I don't want to hear it!" he blustered.
2 : to drive or force by blustering … trying to bluster us into the belief that they are much better than they look.— F. A. Swinnerton

bluster

noun

Definition of bluster (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a violent boisterous blowing … the strong breeze driving them was setting up a bluster on the water.— Rose Thurburn
2 : violent commotion They do their work without bluster or ostentation.— Stanley Walker
3 : loudly boastful or threatening speech growing tired of his macho bluster

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from bluster

Verb

blusterer \ ˈblə-​stər-​ər How to pronounce bluster (audio) \ noun

Noun

blusterous \ ˈblə-​st(ə-​)rəs How to pronounce bluster (audio) \ adjective
blustery \ ˈblə-​st(ə-​)rē How to pronounce bluster (audio) \ adjective

Examples of bluster in a Sentence

Verb He brags and blusters, but he never really does what he says he'll do. “I don't want to hear it!” he blustered. The wind blustered through the valley. Noun We were all tired of his macho bluster. all the bluster in the campaign speech was intended to hide a lack of specifics
See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb But Johnson likes to bluster his way past the facts, and von der Leyen likes to muster them. Washington Post, "Can a Supper Summit resolve Brexit at last? U.K.'s Boris Johnson heads to Brussels.," 9 Dec. 2020 The Herald continued to thrive, Bennett continued to bluster, crimes and calamities continued to happen. James M. Lundberg, Smithsonian Magazine, "How Horace Greeley Turned Newspapers Legitimate and Saved the Media From Itself," 6 Mar. 2020 Iran will bluster and threaten, but waging an all-out war with the U.S. would be suicidal, and Iran knows it. Victor Davis Hanson, National Review, "Iran’s Options in a Showdown with America Are All Bad," 9 Jan. 2020 At times, the actor’s florid portrayal of the quirky, blustering general evokes, of all people, Frank Morgan’s Wizard of Oz. Don Aucoin, BostonGlobe.com, "Subject and style are at war in flawed ‘Ben Butler’," 5 Aug. 2019 But as his host blustered, Mr Khan seemed to have little cause for concern. The Economist, "America swaps its stick for a carrot in its dealings with Pakistan," 25 July 2019 Rather than endure a humiliating climb-down that would involve admission of cheating and the destruction of the new missiles, Putin is blustering new threats. Kyle Mizokami, Popular Mechanics, "As a Key Arms-Control Treaty Is Set to Die, Russia Threatens to Target U.S. with New Nukes," 20 Feb. 2019 And with that, Mai blustered through the mob with security on her tail. Bianca Alysse, Billboard, "Ella Mai Wins New York City Over With Her Enchanting Concert at S.O.B.'s," 16 May 2018 During the same period, my stepmother got breast cancer, my mother-in-law had brain surgery, and Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un blustered on about nuclear war. Jake Halpern, WSJ, "Drip, Drip: Why We Sweat the Small Stuff," 17 Apr. 2018 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Economy’s claims are likely a bit of bluster: The recall is still very much a Republican project and is suddenly now drawing support from the mainstream of California Republican politics. James Pogue, The New Republic, "Gavin Newsom Is Blowing It," 3 Feb. 2021 In their particulars, Dunn’s views often seemed to fall somewhat short of the anarchic bluster of the online Boogaloo. New York Times, "How Armed Protests Are Creating a New Kind of Politics," 26 Jan. 2021 When the coronavirus pandemic closed schools in March, Baker began handing out boxed meals for Minneapolis families, standing for hours outside Bethune through the crisp days of spring, the heat of summer and the bluster of winter. Jackie Crosby, Star Tribune, "Anytrea Baker, upbeat 'lunch lady' in Minneapolis schools, dies at 45," 20 Jan. 2021 The administration’s bluster led to a new trade pact with Canada and Mexico that replaced the quarter-century old Nafta accord and has begun to shape investment decisions across the region. Gabrielle Coppola, Bloomberg.com, "Trump’s Auto-Job Victories Fade as Pandemic Erodes Gains," 15 Oct. 2020 Colorado sees through Trump’s bluster and his divisive special-interest agenda. Morgan Carroll, The Denver Post, "Morgan Carroll: All the lies Trump will tell Coloradans when he comes to town," 19 Feb. 2020 Congress reconvened on Wednesday once the Capitol police routed the mob, and despite all of Trump's bluster, made no attempt to upend the election. Jonathan Bernstein And Bloomberg Opinion (tns), Star Tribune, "Three clashing truths about the Capitol riot," 8 Jan. 2021 Industry officials, however, told Secrets that despite Biden’s bluster, the nation’s new gun-buying surge, and some polls are working against the Democrat’s plan. Paul Bedard, Washington Examiner, "Target Biden: Gun industry readies its biggest political war ever," 19 Nov. 2020 Both McConnell and Pelosi dismissed protests from House Republicans as bluster. Nicholas Rowan, Washington Examiner, "House tea party stars a decade on: Where are they now?," 26 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bluster.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of bluster

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

1582, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for bluster

Verb and Noun

Middle English blustren, probably from Middle Low German blüsteren

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about bluster

Time Traveler for bluster

Time Traveler

The first known use of bluster was in the 15th century

See more words from the same century

Statistics for bluster

Cite this Entry

“Bluster.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bluster. Accessed 7 Mar. 2021.

Style: MLA
MLA Chicago APA Merriam-Webster

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for bluster

bluster

verb

English Language Learners Definition of bluster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to speak in a loud and aggressive or threatening way
of wind : to blow loudly and violently

bluster

noun

English Language Learners Definition of bluster (Entry 2 of 2)

: words that are loud and aggressive

bluster

verb
blus·​ter | \ ˈblə-stər How to pronounce bluster (audio) \
blustered; blustering

Kids Definition of bluster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to talk or act in a noisy boastful way
2 : to blow hard and noisily strong winds blustering

bluster

noun

Kids Definition of bluster (Entry 2 of 2)

: noisy violent action or speech

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on bluster

What made you want to look up bluster? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Who Knew?

Name That Thing

Test your visual vocabulary with our 10-question challenge!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Typeshift

Anagram puzzles meet word search.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!