clot

noun
\ ˈklät How to pronounce clot (audio) \

Definition of clot

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a portion of a substance adhering together in a thick nondescript mass (as of clay or gum)
2a : a roundish viscous lump formed by coagulation of a portion of liquid or by melting
b : a coagulated mass produced by clotting of blood
3 British : blockhead
4 : cluster, group a clot of spectators

clot

verb
clotted; clotting

Definition of clot (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to become a clot : form clots
2 : to undergo a sequence of complex chemical and physical reactions that results in conversion of fluid blood into a coagulated mass : coagulate

transitive verb

1 : to cause to form into or as if into a clot
2 : to fill with clots also : clog clotted streets

Keep scrolling for more

Examples of clot in a Sentence

Noun We were told that his stroke was caused by a clot in his brain. a clot of daisies occupied one corner of the flower bed Verb medications that prevent blood from clotting substances that help to clot blood
See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The drug, derived from pig intestines, is widely used to treat heart attacks and prevent deadly blood clots. Jason Gale | Bloomberg, Washington Post, "Deadly Pig Disease Sparks Fear of a Heart Drug Shortage," 11 Nov. 2019 The stent is coated in medication that prevents blood clots. BostonGlobe.com, "Did Sanders have a heart attack?," 5 Oct. 2019 That is still a risk, requiring monitoring, and patients also often are prescribed blood thinners to prevent clots from forming in the stents. Lauran Neergaard, Twin Cities, "Sanders has heart procedure, cancels campaign events for now," 2 Oct. 2019 The former five-star recruit missed the final five games of the 2018 season after blood clots were found in his lungs, putting his career in jeopardy. Steve Megargee, San Diego Union-Tribune, "Tennessee remains hopeful even after dreadful start," 26 Sep. 2019 Scientists and medical experts will monitor sleep patterns, food and beverage consumption, lighting, physical movement and in-flight entertainment to assess their impact on health and well-being – and prevent any blood clots in the legs. Jay L. Zagorsky, The Conversation, "Why would anyone want to sit on a plane for over 18 hours? An economist takes the world’s longest flight," 28 Aug. 2019 But his 2016 season ended in late August when blood clots were discovered in his right arm. Patrick Saunders, The Denver Post, "Rockies’ Scott Oberg: How the resilient right-hander became a closer," 4 Aug. 2019 Last year Johnson, who signed with Florida State out of high school, was sidelined after the second game of the season once blood clots were discovered in his arm. Shandel Richardson, Sun-Sentinel.com, "FAU coach Lane Kiffin expects quarterback competition to linger until fall camp," 29 Mar. 2018 Doctors performed surgery to control the infection, but blood clots had already formed, cutting off oxygen to his brain. Amanda Macmillan, Health.com, "A 13-Year-Old Died After a Sinus Infection Traveled to His Brain. How Does That Happen?," 16 Mar. 2018 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb But tree lichen—knotted fungi and algae, curling to create its own shade—grows as slow as a fraction of a millimeter a year, clotting over decades in dark webs on old arctic trees. Juliana Hanle, Scientific American, "The Fight for the Reindeer," 18 Nov. 2019 Soon the room is clotted with male bodies, a haphazard ballet of anxious gaits and uncertain smiles. Barrett Swanson, Harper's magazine, "Men at Work," 28 Oct. 2019 In addition to suffering from heart disease, her blood pooled and clotted because no one moved her. Christine Dempsey, courant.com, "Son charged with cruelty after neglect of dying mother in North Canaan, state police say," 17 Sep. 2019 That oversupply of unreliable words, clotting the discourse, feels awfully familiar, even if today most of them come at us electronically. Jesse Green, New York Times, "Review: In Central Park, a ‘Much Ado’ About Something Big," 11 June 2019 And, recently, getting a medical procedure to fix the access site for her needles, which had clotted with blood. Kaiser Health News, oregonlive.com, "Donald Trump wants more kidney patients on home dialysis; here’s the reality of what it’s like," 25 Aug. 2019 Since the 1980s, the French Room has been serving tea sandwiches along with scones, jams, clotted cream and desserts. Rebecca White, Dallas News, "The tea sandwich has returned, and it's modern and creative," 16 July 2019 Calcium allows your blood to clot and your muscles to contract in addition to keeping your bones healthy. Maggie O'neill, Health.com, "Taking Calcium and Vitamin D Supplements Together Could Increase Your Risk of Having a Stroke," 9 July 2019 When a flea bites into flesh, the body responds by clotting blood to prevent bleeding and promote healing. Quanta Magazine, "The Mutant Genes Behind the Black Death," 6 Oct. 2015

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'clot.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of clot

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for clot

Noun

Middle English, from Old English clott; akin to Middle High German klōz lump, ball — more at clout

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about clot

Time Traveler for clot

Time Traveler

The first known use of clot was before the 12th century

See more words from the same century

Statistics for clot

Last Updated

30 Nov 2019

Cite this Entry

“Clot.” The Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Inc., https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/clotted. Accessed 5 December 2019.

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for clot

clot

noun
How to pronounce clot (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of clot

 (Entry 1 of 2)

British, informal : a stupid person

clot

verb

English Language Learners Definition of clot (Entry 2 of 2)

: to become thick and partly solid : to develop clots

clot

noun
\ ˈklät How to pronounce clot (audio) \

Kids Definition of clot

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a lump made by some substance getting thicker and sticking together a blood clot

clot

verb
clotted; clotting

Kids Definition of clot (Entry 2 of 2)

: to become thick and partly solid

clot

noun
\ ˈklät How to pronounce clot (audio) \

Medical Definition of clot

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a coagulated mass produced by clotting of blood

clot

verb
clotted; clotting

Medical Definition of clot (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to undergo a sequence of complex chemical and physical reactions that results in conversion of fluid blood into a coagulum and that involves shedding of blood, release of thromboplastin from blood platelets and injured tissues, inactivation of heparin by thromboplastin permitting calcium ions of the plasma to convert prothrombin to thrombin, interaction of thrombin with fibrinogen to form an insoluble fibrin network in which blood cells and plasma are trapped, and contraction of the network to squeeze out excess fluid : coagulate

transitive verb

: to cause to form into or as if into a clot

Keep scrolling for more

More from Merriam-Webster on clot

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for clot

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with clot

Spanish Central: Translation of clot

Nglish: Translation of clot for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of clot for Arabic Speakers

Comments on clot

What made you want to look up clot? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

to accept, comply, or submit

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Semantic Drift Quiz

  • a twisty river
  • Which of the following was once a synonym for fun?
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Syn City

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!