clot

1 of 2

noun

1
: a portion of a substance adhering together in a thick nondescript mass (as of clay or gum)
2
a
: a roundish viscous lump formed by coagulation of a portion of liquid or by melting
b
: a coagulated mass produced by clotting of blood
3
British : blockhead
4
: cluster, group
a clot of spectators

clot

2 of 2

verb

clotted; clotting

intransitive verb

1
: to become a clot : form clots
2
: to undergo a sequence of complex chemical and physical reactions that results in conversion of fluid blood into a coagulated mass : coagulate

transitive verb

1
: to cause to form into or as if into a clot
2
: to fill with clots
also : clog
clotted streets

Examples of clot in a Sentence

Noun We were told that his stroke was caused by a clot in his brain. a clot of daisies occupied one corner of the flower bed Verb medications that prevent blood from clotting substances that help to clot blood
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
This damage leads to the formation of a clot, which seals off the area and prevents any further fluid leakage or bleeding. William A. Haseltine, Forbes, 30 Nov. 2023 Blood proteins called antibodies could react to animal cells by emitting compounds that cause clots near the transplant organ, for example, slowly but surely degrading its function. Elizabeth Svoboda, Discover Magazine, 3 Dec. 2023 With that decision, the clot, which was being monitored every 12 hours via MRI, was progressing. Angela Andaloro, Peoplemag, 4 Jan. 2024 The most likely explanation, the scientists thought, was that something — a blot clot, clump of mucus or swollen tissue — was preventing the camera from peering deep inside her blowhole. Emily Anthes, New York Times, 26 Dec. 2023 This change can cause cells to clump together, leading to clots and blockages in the blood vessels, starving tissues of oxygen. Berkeley Lovelace Jr., NBC News, 8 Dec. 2023 Clotting is a necessary bodily process to stop bleeding and heal an injury, and clots normally later break down and go away. Erica Sweeney, Men's Health, 27 July 2023 She nurse comes in, checks underneath my wife's gown, presses her three different times and my wife passes three clots the size of my hand. Dante Stewart, Parents, 3 Dec. 2023 For example, those that contain estrogen seem to pose a higher risk of clots than the forms that have no estrogen. Nick Blackmer, Verywell Health, 30 Nov. 2023
Verb
At the same time, the body increases production of thrombin, a clotting agent in the blood. Kaitlin Sullivan, NBC News, 27 Sep. 2023 Immediately after the surgery, doctors realized the blood vessel was clotted– leaving Faulkner to endure yet another surgery in the middle of the night. Akili King, Essence, 26 Oct. 2023 Gabriel’s chapters on this period are clotted with reporterly descriptions of Madonna’s videos and road-show spectaculars, all of which, with the exception of the Madame X Tour, are available to view on YouTube. Michelle Orange, The New Yorker, 9 Oct. 2023 The second protein, fibrinogen, is produced in the liver and causes clotting to stop bleeding. Sara Reardon, Scientific American, 1 Sep. 2023 But Benson’s grandmother had 10 miscarriages, an aunt died of heart disease at 46, and her own clinical history of loss indicated there could be a clotting problem not captured by testing. Sadia Rafiquddin, STAT, 31 Aug. 2023 The most common bleeding disorder that can lead to heavy bleeding is Von Willebrand's disease, where the blood doesn't clot properly. Women's Health, 23 Aug. 2023 At two years post-infection, the non-hospitalized group was at 27% higher risk than the non-COVID control group for ischemic stroke, 23% higher risk of a clotting disorder, 37% higher risk for headaches, and 250% higher risk for still having loss of smell, among many other sequelae. Carolyn Barber, Fortune, 21 Aug. 2023 Blood tests over the next three days tracked erythritol levels and clotting risk. Sandee Lamotte, CNN, 27 Feb. 2023 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'clot.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

Middle English, from Old English clott; akin to Middle High German klōz lump, ball — more at clout

First Known Use

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of clot was before the 12th century

Dictionary Entries Near clot

Cite this Entry

“Clot.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/clot. Accessed 1 Mar. 2024.

Kids Definition

clot

1 of 2 noun
: a mass or lump made by a liquid (as blood) that thickens and sticks together

clot

2 of 2 verb
clotted; clotting
: to become or cause to become a clot : form clots

Medical Definition

clot

1 of 2 noun
: a coagulated mass produced by clotting of blood

clot

2 of 2 verb
clotted; clotting

intransitive verb

: to undergo a sequence of complex chemical and physical reactions that results in conversion of fluid blood into a coagulum and that involves shedding of blood, release of thromboplastin from blood platelets and injured tissues, inactivation of heparin by thromboplastin permitting calcium ions of the plasma to convert prothrombin to thrombin, interaction of thrombin with fibrinogen to form an insoluble fibrin network in which blood cells and plasma are trapped, and contraction of the network to squeeze out excess fluid : coagulate

transitive verb

: to cause to form into or as if into a clot

More from Merriam-Webster on clot

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