change

verb
\ ˈchānj How to pronounce change (audio) \
changed; changing

Definition of change

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to make different in some particular : alter never bothered to change the will
b : to make radically different : transform can't change human nature
c : to give a different position, course, or direction to changed his residence from Ohio to California
2a : to replace with another let's change the subject
b : to make a shift from one to another : switch always changes sides in an argument
c : to exchange for an equivalent sum of money (as in smaller denominations or in a foreign currency) change a 20-dollar bill
d : to undergo a modification of foliage changing color
e : to put fresh clothes or covering on change a bed

intransitive verb

1 : to become different some things never change
2 : to undergo transformation, transition, or substitution winter changed to spring
3 : exchange, switch neither liked his seat so they changed with each other
4 : to put on different clothes need a few minutes to change for dinner
5 : to shift one's means of conveyance : transfer on the bus trip he had to change twice
6 of the voice : to shift to lower register : break His voice started to change when he turned 13.
7 of the moon : to pass from one phase (see phase entry 1 sense 1) to another
change hands
: to pass from the possession of one owner to that of another money changes hands many times

change

noun

Definition of change (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the act, process, or result of changing: such as
a : alteration a change in the weather
b : transformation a time of vast social change going through changes
c : substitution a change of scenery
d : the passage of the moon from one monthly revolution (see revolution sense 1a) to another also : the passage of the moon from one phase (see phase entry 1 sense 1) to another
e : menopause
2a : money in small denominations received in exchange for an equivalent sum in larger denominations
b : money returned when a payment exceeds the amount due a cashier quick at making change
c : coins especially of low denominations a pocketful of change
d : a negligible additional amount only six minutes and change left in the game
e : money sense 1 cost a large chunk of change
3 : a fresh set of clothes
4 British : exchange sense 5a
5 : changeup
6 : an order in which a set of bells is struck in change ringing

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Other Words from change

Verb

changer noun

Choose the Right Synonym for change

Verb

change, alter, vary, modify mean to make or become different. change implies making either an essential difference often amounting to a loss of original identity or a substitution of one thing for another. changed the shirt for a larger size alter implies a difference in some particular respect without suggesting loss of identity. slightly altered the original design vary stresses a breaking away from sameness, duplication, or exact repetition. vary your daily routine modify suggests a difference that limits, restricts, or adapts to a new purpose. modified the building for use by the disabled

Examples of change in a Sentence

Verb He changed from an optimist to a pessimist. The town has changed little in recent years. These events have changed me in my attitude to life. You can't change human nature. Their relationship seems to have changed for the better. The leaves change color from green to red in the fall. She changed her name when she got married. France has changed its monetary unit from the franc to the euro. change the channel on the TV Noun There has been little if any change in her daily routine. You shouldn't be afraid of change. Change is a natural part of life. The years have brought many changes to the town's economy. We need to make some changes in the system. Many voters believe that it's time for a change. We've had to make a slight change in the schedule. a change for the worse We've been so busy that a quiet day at home was a welcome change. We eat at home a lot, so dining out sometimes is a nice change. Have you got change for a $10 bill?
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Only one member has openly voiced a readiness to change sides. New York Times, "After Going ‘Free of L.G.B.T.,’ a Polish Town Pays a Price," 10 Apr. 2021 Only one member has openly voiced a readiness to change sides. BostonGlobe.com, "After going ‘free of LGBT,’ a Polish town pays a price," 10 Apr. 2021 An essential element in the assertion or maintenance of sovereignty is a nation’s ability to change its mind. Andrew Stuttaford, National Review, "‘Stuffing Their Mouths with Gold’ — Selling the Biden/Yellen Tax Cartel," 10 Apr. 2021 But Biden's more traditional understanding of the politician's job has given him the flexibility to change alongside the country. Ezra Klein, Star Tribune, "The re-education of a public man," 10 Apr. 2021 But, legislators have the ability to change their vote during the process and after an hour of non-public talk on the floor a clear majority for reappointment turned to a slim majority to deny the appointment. John Cherwa, Los Angeles Times, "Horse racing newsletter: Jon White’s Kentucky Derby rankings," 9 Apr. 2021 This is a historic opportunity to change course from the past decades of disappointing economic performance, and demonstrate the real path to sustained economic growth that benefits working and middle class Americans—, not just the wealthy. Christian Weller, Forbes, "President Biden’s Policies Will Create Faster, More Inclusive Growth," 9 Apr. 2021 Since then, former Limestone County Schools Superintendent Tom Sisk and Corkren have each announced an intent to change their plea to guilty. al, "Retired football coach to plead guilty in Alabama school fraud," 8 Apr. 2021 Now, thanks to Democrats' performance during the coronavirus pandemic, Grenell said, conservatives have a chance to change the state's trajectory. Tyler Olson, Fox News, "Grenell group seeks to reshape California politics beyond recall: Californians want 'permanent change'," 8 Apr. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The Providence City Council Ordinance Committee is holding a virtual public hearing at 5:30 p.m. on a zoning change for the former St Joseph’s Hospital, which is expected to be converted to a school. BostonGlobe.com, "It looks like URI has found its next president," 12 Apr. 2021 The question is how such videos shared on social media could lead to social change. Peter Suciu, Forbes, "Will Social Media Lead To Police Reform Following Recent High Profile Events?," 12 Apr. 2021 Plus, districts stressed that plans are still subject to change and will include precautions made with local health departments. Arika Herron, The Indianapolis Star, "Here’s a look at what Central Indiana high schools are planning for graduation this year," 12 Apr. 2021 In open session at 5:30 p.m., the council will discuss an application for a zoning change to mixed use for 8.3 acres at 650 Sycamore Ave. Laura Groch, San Diego Union-Tribune, "On the agenda, April 11," 11 Apr. 2021 All orchestra programs remain subject to change, and complete program details and potentially more guest artists will be unveiled at a later date. Zachary Lewis, cleveland, "Cleveland Orchestra to perform at least 11 concerts with live audiences this summer at Blossom Music Center," 11 Apr. 2021 The card, of course, in wrestling is always subject to change. Dan Gelston, Star Tribune, "Back in Business: WrestleMania ready to rumble with fans," 9 Apr. 2021 The president also wants to increase spending to combat climate change by $14 billion across agencies. Sarah Ewall-wice, CBS News, "Biden administration reveals first 2022 budget request: $1.5 trillion in discretionary funding," 9 Apr. 2021 Here is a schedule — with dates subject to change — of concerts at some of Utah’s larger venues, set through the end of September. Sean P. Means, The Salt Lake Tribune, "Utah’s large music venues are reopening gradually. Here’s who’s scheduled to perform so far.," 8 Apr. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'change.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of change

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 2

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for change

Verb and Noun

Middle English, from Anglo-French changer, from Latin cambiare to exchange, probably of Celtic origin; akin to Old Irish camm crooked

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Time Traveler for change

Time Traveler

The first known use of change was in the 13th century

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Statistics for change

Last Updated

14 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Change.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/change. Accessed 17 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for change

change

verb

English Language Learners Definition of change

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to become different
: to make (someone or something) different
: to become something else

change

noun

English Language Learners Definition of change (Entry 2 of 2)

: the act of becoming different or of causing someone or something to become different
: the act of replacing one thing with another
: the act of moving from one plane, train, etc., to another in order to continue a journey

change

verb
\ ˈchānj How to pronounce change (audio) \
changed; changing

Kids Definition of change

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to make or become different changing autumn leaves I like how you've changed this room.
2 : to give a different position, course, or direction to I changed my plans.
3 : to put one thing in the place of another : switch Our teacher made us change places.
4 : to give or receive an equal amount of money in usually smaller units of value or in the money of another country Can you change a ten-dollar bill?
5 : to put fresh clothes or covering on change a bed
6 : to put on different clothes We always change for dinner.
change hands
: to pass from one person's possession or ownership to another's The restaurant has changed hands.

change

noun

Kids Definition of change (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the act, process, or result of making or becoming different There's been a change in plans. a change of seasons
2 : something that is different from what is usual or expected The trip was a welcome change from our routine.
3 : a fresh set of clothes Pack several changes for your vacation.
4 : money in small units of value received in exchange for an equal amount in larger units Do you have change for a ten-dollar bill?
5 : money returned when a payment is more than the amount due Don't forget your change.
6 : money in coins I have two dollars in change.

Choose the Right Synonym for change

Verb

change, alter, and vary mean to make or become different. change may be used for making such a difference in a thing that it becomes something else. They've changed the house into a restaurant. Change may also be used for substituting one thing for another. We changed our seats for better ones. alter is used for making a small difference in something. He altered the picture by adding color. vary is used for making a difference in order to break away from a routine. The boss varied our tasks.

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Comments on change

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