arise

verb
\ ə-ˈrīz How to pronounce arise (audio) \
arose\ ə-​ˈrōz How to pronounce arise (audio) \; arisen\ ə-​ˈri-​zᵊn How to pronounce arise (audio) \; arising\ ə-​ˈrī-​ziŋ How to pronounce arise (audio) \

Definition of arise

intransitive verb

1a : to begin to occur or to exist : to come into being or to attention Problems arise when people try to avoid responsibility. A conflict arose because of a misunderstanding. Questions have arisen concerning the company's financial records. He can defend himself should the need arise. [=if it becomes necessary to do so]
b : to originate from a source arteries that arise from the aorta a river that arises from two main sources
2 : to get up or stand up : rise He arose from his chair. especially : to get up from sleep or after lying down He arose (from bed) refreshed after a good night's sleep.
3 : to move upward : ascend A mist arose from the valley.

Synonyms & Antonyms for arise

Synonyms

Antonyms

Visit the Thesaurus for More 

Choose the Right Synonym for arise

spring, arise, rise, originate, derive, flow, issue, emanate, proceed, stem mean to come up or out of something into existence. spring implies rapid or sudden emerging. an idea that springs to mind arise and rise may both convey the fact of coming into existence or notice but rise often stresses gradual growth or ascent. new questions have arisen slowly rose to prominence originate implies a definite source or starting point. the fire originated in the basement derive implies a prior existence in another form. the holiday derives from an ancient Roman feast flow adds to spring a suggestion of abundance or ease of inception. words flowed easily from her pen issue suggests emerging from confinement through an outlet. blood issued from the cut emanate applies to the coming of something immaterial (such as a thought) from a source. reports emanating from the capital proceed stresses place of origin, derivation, parentage, or logical cause. advice that proceeds from the best of intentions stem implies originating by dividing or branching off from something as an outgrowth or subordinate development. industries stemming from space research

Examples of arise in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web But the expectation that a VC will participate in a round or sign a term sheet shouldn’t arise until the formal process kicks off. Mike Ghaffary, Fortune, 15 June 2022 But several problems arise when litigation is the only focus of a D&I program. Mohammad Anwar, Forbes, 5 May 2022 Quasars arise at the center of a galaxy where gravity is pulling matter into a black hole, but some particles escape and are jettisoned away at almost the speed of light. Mike Snider, USA TODAY, 5 Mar. 2022 Sometimes, this quality can arise when a wine is made in airtight conditions, but this wine was fermented in concrete and aged in old barrels, both of which permit a small degree of oxygenation, so that would not have been the cause. New York Times, 17 Feb. 2022 But as Brown’s film suggests, many more questions still arise. Essence, 8 Feb. 2022 Tensions quickly arise, but there’s no amount of family drama that the magic of Christmas can’t cure (onscreen, that is). Lilah Ramzi, Vogue, 27 Nov. 2021 These kinds of mood and psychiatric symptoms typically arise during adolescence or early adulthood, but the COVID-19 patients who developed them were significantly older. Karen Kaplan Science And Medicine Editor, Los Angeles Times, 9 Nov. 2021 But in an expanded online world, many more thorny issues will arise—probably more than a 20-person board can handle. Camille Squires, Quartz, 29 Oct. 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'arise.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of arise

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for arise

Middle English, from Old English ārīsan, from ā-, perfective prefix + rīsan to rise — more at abide

Learn More About arise

Time Traveler for arise

Time Traveler

The first known use of arise was before the 12th century

See more words from the same century

Dictionary Entries Near arise

Arisaka

arise

arisings

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for arise

Last Updated

23 Jun 2022

Cite this Entry

“Arise.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/arise. Accessed 30 Jun. 2022.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

More Definitions for arise

arise

verb
\ ə-ˈrīz How to pronounce arise (audio) \
arose\ -​ˈrōz \; arisen\ -​ˈri-​zᵊn \; arising\ -​ˈrī-​ziŋ \

Kids Definition of arise

1 : to move upward Mist arose from the valley.
2 : to get up from sleep or after lying down
3 : to come into existence A dispute arose.

More from Merriam-Webster on arise

Nglish: Translation of arise for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of arise for Arabic Speakers

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Words Named After People

  • name tags
  • Namesake of the leotard, Jules Léotard had what profession?
Name That Thing

Test your visual vocabulary with our 10-question challenge!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Universal Daily Crossword

A daily challenge for crossword fanatics.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!