aggregate

adjective
ag·​gre·​gate | \ ˈa-gri-gət How to pronounce aggregate (audio) \

Definition of aggregate

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: formed by the collection of units or particles into a body, mass, or amount : collective: such as
a(1) : clustered in a dense mass or head an aggregate flower
(2) : formed from several separate ovaries of a single flower aggregate fruit
b : composed of mineral crystals of one or more kinds or of mineral rock fragments
c : taking all units as a whole aggregate sales

aggregate

verb
ag·​gre·​gate | \ ˈa-gri-ˌgāt How to pronounce aggregate (audio) \
aggregated; aggregating

Definition of aggregate (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to collect or gather into a mass or whole The census data were aggregated by gender.
2 : to amount to (a whole sum or total) : total audiences aggregating several million people

aggregate

noun
ag·​gre·​gate | \ ˈa-gri-gət How to pronounce aggregate (audio) \

Definition of aggregate (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : a mass or body of units or parts somewhat loosely associated with one another Froth is an aggregate of tiny bubbles.
2 : the whole sum or amount : sum total spent an aggregate of 10 million dollars in advertising during the past three years
3a : a rock composed of mineral crystals of one or more kinds or of mineral rock fragments : an aggregate rock
b : any of several hard inert materials (such as sand, gravel, or slag) used for mixing with a cementing material to form concrete, mortar, or plaster
c : a clustered mass of individual soil particles varied in shape, ranging in size from a microscopic granule to a small crumb, and considered the basic structural unit of soil
in the aggregate
: considered as a whole : collectively Dividends for the year amounted in the aggregate to 25 million dollars.

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Other Words from aggregate

Adjective

aggregately adverb
aggregateness noun

Did You Know?

Noun

We added "aggregate" to our flock of Latin borrowings in the 15th century. It descends from "aggregare" ("to add to"), a Latin verb made up of the prefix ad- (which means "to," and which usually changes to "ag-" before a "g") and "greg-" or "grex" (meaning "flock"). "Greg-" also gave us "congregate," "gregarious," and "segregate." "Aggregate" is commonly employed in the phrase "in the aggregate," which means "considered as a whole" (as in the sentence "In the aggregate, the student's various achievements were sufficiently impressive to merit a scholarship"). "Aggregate" also has some specialized senses. For example, it is used for a mass of minerals formed into a rock and for a material, such as sand or gravel, used to form concrete, mortar, or plaster.

Examples of aggregate in a Sentence

Adjective There were to be thirty-seven playgrounds, twenty schools. There were to be a hundred and thirty-three miles of street, paved with an inch and a half of No. 2 macadam on an aggregate base. — Joan Didion, New Yorker, 26 July 1993 Their success at opening up new sources of supply, generating and servicing demand, and connecting new markets with the processing industries of the Amsterdam entrepôt seemed … to belie the axiom of an inelastic aggregate volume of world trade—a zero-sum competition. — Simon Schama, The Embarrassment of Riches, 1988 The mulberry looks a bit like a raspberry. But the raspberry (along with the other brambles, members of the genus Rubus, such as the blackberry) is an aggregate fruit generated by a single, if complex, flower. — Raymond Sokolov, Natural History, October 1986 With Keynes, standard theory conceded that disequilibria might intrude upon the economy as a whole, but it held that these could be remedied by judicious stabilization of aggregate demand—that is, combined government and consumer purchasing power. — Robert Kuttner, Atlantic, February 1985 The university receives more than half its aggregate income from government sources. The team with the highest aggregate score wins. Verb The problem, in this case, is that the synergy creates incentives for segregation. Ethnic advertisers scour the TV schedule for shows and channels that "aggregate" viewers of the type the client wants to reach … — Tamar Jacoby, New Republic, 24 Jan. 2000 "We are good at aggregating eyeballs and delivering services," says Barry Schuler, the president of AOL Interactive Services, "and the Time Warner deal is a natural extension of that." — Barry Schuler, Fortune, 7 Feb. 2000 Pollsters, for the most part, know perfectly well what they are doing. One thing they are doing is aggregating and averaging ephemeral spasms of "mood" that may have commercial or political value. — Christopher Hitchens, Harper's, April 1992 … covered only if each of the corporations involved has capital, surplus and undivided profits aggregating more than $10 million … — Joe Sims et al., National Law Journal, 28 Jan. 1991 The Web site aggregates content from many other sites. over time, her petty thefts aggregated a significant shortfall in the company's books Noun In particular, a core of popular politically minded blogs known in the aggregate as the Blogosphere has been a beehive of furious activity. Or should I say a wasp's nest? — Steven Levy, Newsweek, 4 Oct. 2004 It's true that our lives are the aggregate of a lot of little things, that's precisely why, at least once a year, we need to ride the wave of something bigger and bolder than our own little humdrum existence. — Will Manley, Booklist, 1 Sept. 2002 Smallness of enterprises, as in the Japanese bicycle-manufacturing development, is an asset because smallness cuts down administrative and other overhead costs both in individual enterprises and in the aggregate, in comparison with the overhead costs of large operations. — Jane Jacobs, Cities and the Wealth of Nations, (1984) 1985 numerous episodes of pilferage, taken in the aggregate, can really add up to a significant sum
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective In 10% of cases, IMF found the aggregate market effect of a disaster was greater than 14%, but the market effect doesn’t necessarily match up with overall monetary damages. Josh Siegel, Washington Examiner, "Daily on Energy: Developers seek IRS fix for carbon capture rules," 1 June 2020 When attorneys statewide were asked to rate the eight applicants’ performance, Roetman received the lowest aggregate score, a 3.4 on a 5-point scale. James Brooks, Anchorage Daily News, "Alaska Judicial Council picks 4 finalists for Supreme Court vacancy," 20 May 2020 Those at the lower end of the wage scale who, in aggregate terms, can benefit most from a boom are the hardest hit in the slump. David Blanchflower, The New York Review of Books, "The Pandemic Jobless Youthquake," 8 May 2020 But the share of small businesses operating and the hours worked in them budged little through the following week, according to data from companies that help firms manage business and track payrolls, or that aggregate credit card transactions. Alicia Parlapiano, New York Times, "Government Orders Alone Didn’t Close the Economy. They Probably Can’t Reopen It.," 7 May 2020 The Athletic compiled an aggregate list of the top 300 NFL Draft prospects from various sources. Eric Hansen, Indianapolis Star, "ESPN's Kirk Herbstreit talks Notre Dame draft, the college football season," 20 Apr. 2020 Climate stress tests of the French financial sector will be published in aggregate and anonymously, the country’s central bank said Tuesday, echoing a design the Bank of England has suggested. William Horobin, Bloomberg.com, "French Climate Stress Tests for Financiers to Be Anonymous," 12 May 2020 Of course this is not perfect, but in aggregate and at scale, SafeGraph’s at-home numbers track with other data sources, including location-data research published by other companies and public polling. Washington Post, "Here’s where people are going," 6 May 2020 Here's a symptom tracking map that Facebook has put together with the aggregate data: Just as bluetooth contact tracing apps require scale to work, CMU's models will only become more accurate as more people take these surveys. Courtney Linder, Popular Mechanics, "We're Flattening the Curve. So When Will This All Be Over?," 23 Apr. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The data that’s collected by a third party is anonymized and results are aggregated at the population level. Sandrine Rastello, Bloomberg.com, "A Software Company Touted by Trudeau Uses Phone Data to Map Outbreak," 10 May 2020 Shopify said aggregated online sales of its merchant customer base grew 46 percent in the first quarter and accelerated further in April. Washington Post, "The Technology 202: Former Google CEO Eric Schmidt takes on new role in coronavirus response," 9 May 2020 The trick here is, those writes also remain in memory, being aggregated along with normal asynchronous write requests, to later be flushed out to storage as perfectly normal TXGs (Transaction Groups). Jim Salter, Ars Technica, "ZFS 101—Understanding ZFS storage and performance," 8 May 2020 They are compiled by CDC experts under a national vital statistics program that aggregates deaths reported by local and state health authorities. Matt Stiles, Los Angeles Times, "Coronavirus death toll higher in California than previously known, new data suggest," 29 Apr. 2020 Showfields, Bulletin, Story, and Neighborhood Goods are all variations on the same theme, curating and aggregating DTC concepts under one roof without requiring long-term lease commitments and expensive build-outs. Adam Lashinsky, Fortune, "Google’s coronavirus aid for small businesses is too little, too slow," 3 Apr. 2020 Through Tuesday, nearly 4,600 Oregonians and 345,000 Americans had received coronavirus results, according to state numbers and data collected by the COVID Tracking Project, a website aggregating state and national testing totals. oregonlive, "Tested for coronavirus, some Oregonians wait nearly two weeks to learn results," 26 Mar. 2020 Xandr builds similar audience groups based on customer data from AT&T’s wireless and broadband businesses, DirecTV and AT&T U-Verse, anonymously aggregated into segments such as homeowners or those in the market for a new car. Sahil Patel, WSJ, "AT&T’s Xandr Ad Unit Cuts TV Deals With Disney and AMC," 11 Mar. 2020 This is in direct contrast to traditional data science methods, which require aggregating increasingly large amounts and types of data into a central location. Robert C. Miller, STAT, "Federated learning: collaboration without compromise for health care research," 13 Feb. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun In the end, even though the snapshot calculations are different, the public testing numbers released each day and the weekly numbers provided to lawmakers add up to the same aggregate. oregonlive, "Inconsistencies emerge in state’s coronavirus test data to lawmakers," 28 Apr. 2020 But a statistics of death was also a way of making every individual meaningful, even as that meaning was determined by the aggregate. Shannon Pufahl, The New York Review of Books, "Numbering the Dead," 21 Apr. 2020 This is plausible in the aggregate at certain income levels. Simon Johnson, WSJ, "Warren, Unlike Sanders, Makes the Medicare Math Add Up," 2 Mar. 2020 Just an impressive Pacific Rossby wave train seen in the upcoming 15-day aggregate with Greenland Blocking. Chris Bianchi, The Denver Post, "Welcome to Octobuary in Denver: More snow and cold in the forecast," 24 Oct. 2019 For them, the COVID-19 pandemic has triggered intertwined crises of personal health and personal finance, threatening disaster for them individually and, in the aggregate, for the country. Geoff Colvin, Fortune, "How the American economy can recover from the coronavirus pandemic," 20 Apr. 2020 But Hofmann makes many choices that, in the aggregate, give us a sharper and more stylish book. Christine Smallwood, Harper's Magazine, "Through Clenched Teeth," 30 Mar. 2020 In the aggregate, these disparities mean that children from wealthy families across the country begin life with greater educational opportunities, and a better chance at success later on. Adam Cohen, Time, "How the Supreme Court Favors the Rich and Powerful," 3 Mar. 2020 In aggregate, women’s work is less volatile in normal times than men’s, and less prone to big cyclical changes. Cassie Werber, Quartz at Work, "The Covid-19 recession will hurt women more, but it might nudge them toward equality," 15 Apr. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'aggregate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of aggregate

Adjective

15th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for aggregate

Adjective

Middle English aggregat, borrowed from Latin aggregātus, past participle of aggregāre "to cause to flock together, join, include, lump together," from ad- ad- + -gregāre, verbal derivative of greg-, grex "flock, herd, group" — more at gregarious

Verb

Middle English aggregaten, borrowed from Latin aggregātus, past participle of aggregāre "to cause to flock together, join" — more at aggregate entry 1

Noun

Middle English aggregat, borrowed from Medieval Latin aggregātus, noun derivative of Latin aggregātus, past participle of aggregāre "to cause to flock together, join" — more at aggregate entry 1

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Time Traveler for aggregate

Time Traveler

The first known use of aggregate was in the 15th century

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Statistics for aggregate

Last Updated

5 Jun 2020

Cite this Entry

“Aggregate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/aggregate. Accessed 5 Jun. 2020.

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More Definitions for aggregate

aggregate

adjective
How to pronounce aggregate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of aggregate

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: formed by adding together two or more amounts

aggregate

verb
How to pronounce aggregate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of aggregate (Entry 2 of 3)

formal
: to join or combine into a single group
: to equal a specified number or amount

aggregate

noun
How to pronounce aggregate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of aggregate (Entry 3 of 3)

formal : a total amount

aggregate

verb
ag·​gre·​gate | \ ˈa-gri-ˌgāt How to pronounce aggregate (audio) \
aggregated; aggregating

Kids Definition of aggregate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to collect or gather into a mass or whole The particles of sand aggregated into giant dunes.

aggregate

noun
ag·​gre·​gate | \ ˈa-gri-gət How to pronounce aggregate (audio) \

Kids Definition of aggregate (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a mass or body of units or parts The rock is an aggregate of several minerals.
2 : the whole sum or amount They won by an aggregate of 30 points.

aggregate

adjective
ag·​gre·​gate | \ ˈag-ri-gət How to pronounce aggregate (audio) \

Medical Definition of aggregate

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: formed by the collection of units or particles into a body, mass, or amount

Other Words from aggregate

aggregation \ ˌag-​ri-​ˈgā-​shən How to pronounce aggregation (audio) \ noun
It is now known that these calcifications represent focal aggregations of calcium hydroxyapatite … Medical Radiography & Photography, 1982

aggregate

transitive verb
ag·​gre·​gate | \ -ˌgāt How to pronounce aggregate (audio) \
aggregated; aggregating

Medical Definition of aggregate (Entry 2 of 3)

: to collect or gather into a mass or whole aggregated human albumin

aggregate

noun
ag·​gre·​gate | \ -gət How to pronounce aggregate (audio) \

Medical Definition of aggregate (Entry 3 of 3)

: a mass or body of units or parts somewhat loosely associated with one another

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aggregate

adjective
ag·​gre·​gate | \ ˈa-grə-gət How to pronounce aggregate (audio) \

Legal Definition of aggregate

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: taken as a total aggregate liability

aggregate

verb
ag·​gre·​gate | \ ˈa-grə-ˌgāt How to pronounce aggregate (audio) \
aggregated; aggregating

Legal Definition of aggregate (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to combine or gather into a whole class members may aggregate their individual claims — compare join
2 : to amount to an award aggregating $100,000

intransitive verb

: to form an aggregate they may not aggregate if their claims are regarded as “separate and distinct”— J. M. Landers et al.

aggregate

noun
ag·​gre·​gate | \ ˈa-grə-gət How to pronounce aggregate (audio) \

Legal Definition of aggregate (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : total amount may sue in federal court if the aggregate of the claims exceeds $75,000
2 : a whole made up of individual units the aggregate of operative facts

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Comments on aggregate

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