gregarious

adjective
gre·​gar·​i·​ous | \ gri-ˈger-ē-əs \

Definition of gregarious

1a : tending to associate with others of one's kind : social gregarious animals
b : marked by or indicating a liking for companionship : sociable is friendly, outgoing, and gregarious
c : of or relating to a social group
2a of a plant : growing in a cluster or a colony
b : living in contiguous nests but not forming a true colony used especially of wasps and bees

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from gregarious

gregariously adverb
gregariousness noun

Did You Know?

When you're one of the herd, it's tough to avoid being social. The etymology of gregarious reflects the social nature of the flock; in fact, the word grew out of the Latin noun grex, meaning "herd" or "flock." When it first began appearing in English texts in the 17th century, "gregarious" was applied mainly to animals, but by the 18th century it was being used for social human beings as well. By the way, "grex" gave English a whole flock of other words too, including "egregious," "aggregate," "congregate," and "segregate."

Examples of gregarious in a Sentence

[J.P.] Morgan was attracted to bright, self-possessed women who met him on his own ground, felt at home in society, and shared his gregarious instincts and sybaritic tastes. — Jean Strouse, New Yorker, 29 Mar. 1999 … the gregarious trade unionist whose back-slapping mateyness helped make him Australia's most popular politician. Time, 3 Apr. 1989 As it is a night of many parties, the more social, the more gregarious, the more invited of the guests are wondering whether to go to Harley Street first, or whether to arrive there later, after sampling other offerings. — Margaret Drabble, Harper's, July 1987 She is outgoing and gregarious. a gregarious child who ran up to every person on the playground and wanted to be their friend
See More

Recent Examples on the Web

These sober emissaries seem oddly matched, at first, with two gregarious, rumpled (and rather clownishly drawn) economics professors dispatched by Rabin. Misha Berson, The Seattle Times, "At ACT Theatre, ‘Oslo’ finds crackling drama in back-channel negotiations," 23 Oct. 2018 The three arrived in Talent a few days later to a warm welcome from Rodas’ gregarious 9- and 5-year-old daughters, Evelyn and Kailyn, and her year-old son, Liam, in Unit No. Miriam Jordan, The Seattle Times, "Separated for 51 days, a reunited migrant family starts a new life in Oregon," 10 Sep. 2018 Image Tireless and gregarious, Hosack was a part of that productive generation of the first years of the new Republic. Marta Mcdowell, New York Times, "Deep Below Rockefeller Center Lies a Legendary Botanical Garden," 25 June 2018 Bart was bigger than life even as a toddler: with an adorable head of curls, big brown eyes that didn't miss a trick and a gregarious personality. Hartford Courant, courant.com, "Barton W. Blau," 7 June 2018 Above all, there is the nearly uniform quality of the boys’ gregarious charm, which would have made them ideal camera subjects even under less emotionally fraught circumstances. Justin Chang, latimes.com, "'Three Identical Strangers' is a riveting account of identical triplets separated at birth," 28 June 2018 But while seemingly fearless, gregarious and quick with a joke, Ross wasn’t known to speak much about himself. Gary Warth, sandiegouniontribune.com, "Water Man Dave's personal hardship inspired life of caring," 10 Apr. 2018 Reilly was known for his gregarious personality, his Mardi Gras parties, and his ever-present golden retriever. James Sullivan, BostonGlobe.com, "In a sentimental mood at Ryles," 27 June 2018 Billy Sammeth, the gregarious personal manager who shepherded the careers of multiplatform superstars Cher and Joan Rivers while also working with the likes of Donny Osmond, Olivia Newton-John and K.C. and the Sunshine Band, died Monday. Deborah Wilker, The Hollywood Reporter, "Billy Sammeth, Longtime Manager of Cher and Joan Rivers, Dies at 66," 18 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'gregarious.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of gregarious

1668, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for gregarious

Latin gregarius of a flock or herd, from greg-, grex flock, herd

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about gregarious

Share gregarious

Listen to Our Podcast about gregarious

Statistics for gregarious

Last Updated

17 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for gregarious

The first known use of gregarious was in 1668

See more words from the same year

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for gregarious

gregarious

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of gregarious

: enjoying the company of other people

biology : tending to live in groups

gregarious

adjective
gre·​gar·​i·​ous | \ gri-ˈger-ē-əs \

Kids Definition of gregarious

1 : enjoying the company of other people
2 : tending to live in a flock, herd, or community rather than alone gregarious insects

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on gregarious

What made you want to look up gregarious? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

a complex dispute or argument

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Homophone Quiz

  • three-bears-two-of-them-look-like-theyre-whispering-to-a-third-bear-who-looks-chuffed-to-be-the-center-of-attention
  • In order to judge how people felt, the senator's office hired a firm to take a ______.
How Strong Is Your Vocabulary?

Test your vocabulary with our 10-question quiz!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Word Winder's CrossWinder

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ

Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!