aggregate

adjective
ag·​gre·​gate | \ ˈa-gri-gət How to pronounce aggregate (audio) \

Definition of aggregate

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: formed by the collection of units or particles into a body, mass, or amount : collective: such as
a(1) : clustered in a dense mass or head an aggregate flower
(2) : formed from several separate ovaries of a single flower aggregate fruit
b : composed of mineral crystals of one or more kinds or of mineral rock fragments
c : taking all units as a whole aggregate sales

aggregate

verb
ag·​gre·​gate | \ ˈa-gri-ˌgāt How to pronounce aggregate (audio) \
aggregated; aggregating

Definition of aggregate (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to collect or gather into a mass or whole The census data were aggregated by gender.
2 : to amount to (a whole sum or total) : total audiences aggregating several million people

aggregate

noun
ag·​gre·​gate | \ ˈa-gri-gət How to pronounce aggregate (audio) \

Definition of aggregate (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : a mass or body of units or parts somewhat loosely associated with one another Froth is an aggregate of tiny bubbles.
2 : the whole sum or amount : sum total spent an aggregate of 10 million dollars in advertising during the past three years
3a : a rock composed of mineral crystals of one or more kinds or of mineral rock fragments : an aggregate rock
b : any of several hard inert materials (such as sand, gravel, or slag) used for mixing with a cementing material to form concrete, mortar, or plaster
c : a clustered mass of individual soil particles varied in shape, ranging in size from a microscopic granule to a small crumb, and considered the basic structural unit of soil
in the aggregate
: considered as a whole : collectively Dividends for the year amounted in the aggregate to 25 million dollars.

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Other Words from aggregate

Adjective

aggregately adverb
aggregateness noun

Did You Know?

Noun

We added "aggregate" to our flock of Latin borrowings in the 15th century. It descends from "aggregare" ("to add to"), a Latin verb made up of the prefix ad- (which means "to," and which usually changes to "ag-" before a "g") and "greg-" or "grex" (meaning "flock"). "Greg-" also gave us "congregate," "gregarious," and "segregate." "Aggregate" is commonly employed in the phrase "in the aggregate," which means "considered as a whole" (as in the sentence "In the aggregate, the student's various achievements were sufficiently impressive to merit a scholarship"). "Aggregate" also has some specialized senses. For example, it is used for a mass of minerals formed into a rock and for a material, such as sand or gravel, used to form concrete, mortar, or plaster.

Examples of aggregate in a Sentence

Adjective There were to be thirty-seven playgrounds, twenty schools. There were to be a hundred and thirty-three miles of street, paved with an inch and a half of No. 2 macadam on an aggregate base. — Joan Didion, New Yorker, 26 July 1993 Their success at opening up new sources of supply, generating and servicing demand, and connecting new markets with the processing industries of the Amsterdam entrepôt seemed … to belie the axiom of an inelastic aggregate volume of world trade—a zero-sum competition. — Simon Schama, The Embarrassment of Riches, 1988 The mulberry looks a bit like a raspberry. But the raspberry (along with the other brambles, members of the genus Rubus, such as the blackberry) is an aggregate fruit generated by a single, if complex, flower. — Raymond Sokolov, Natural History, October 1986 With Keynes, standard theory conceded that disequilibria might intrude upon the economy as a whole, but it held that these could be remedied by judicious stabilization of aggregate demand—that is, combined government and consumer purchasing power. — Robert Kuttner, Atlantic, February 1985 The university receives more than half its aggregate income from government sources. The team with the highest aggregate score wins. Verb The problem, in this case, is that the synergy creates incentives for segregation. Ethnic advertisers scour the TV schedule for shows and channels that "aggregate" viewers of the type the client wants to reach … — Tamar Jacoby, New Republic, 24 Jan. 2000 "We are good at aggregating eyeballs and delivering services," says Barry Schuler, the president of AOL Interactive Services, "and the Time Warner deal is a natural extension of that." — Barry Schuler, Fortune, 7 Feb. 2000 Pollsters, for the most part, know perfectly well what they are doing. One thing they are doing is aggregating and averaging ephemeral spasms of "mood" that may have commercial or political value. — Christopher Hitchens, Harper's, April 1992 … covered only if each of the corporations involved has capital, surplus and undivided profits aggregating more than $10 million … — Joe Sims et al., National Law Journal, 28 Jan. 1991 The Web site aggregates content from many other sites. over time, her petty thefts aggregated a significant shortfall in the company's books Noun In particular, a core of popular politically minded blogs known in the aggregate as the Blogosphere has been a beehive of furious activity. Or should I say a wasp's nest? — Steven Levy, Newsweek, 4 Oct. 2004 It's true that our lives are the aggregate of a lot of little things, that's precisely why, at least once a year, we need to ride the wave of something bigger and bolder than our own little humdrum existence. — Will Manley, Booklist, 1 Sept. 2002 Smallness of enterprises, as in the Japanese bicycle-manufacturing development, is an asset because smallness cuts down administrative and other overhead costs both in individual enterprises and in the aggregate, in comparison with the overhead costs of large operations. — Jane Jacobs, Cities and the Wealth of Nations, (1984) 1985 numerous episodes of pilferage, taken in the aggregate, can really add up to a significant sum
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Agency staff relied on aggregate usage numbers provided by Uber to justify continuing the service but discovered a programming glitch had inflated ridership for months. Steven Higashide, The New Republic, "Uber and Lyft Are Charging Through Washington’s Revolving Door," 25 Sep. 2020 The free app will display aggregate data without identifying any mask scofflaws or maskless corners, just neighborhoods where mask wearing is more or less prevalent. Shari Rudavsky, The Indianapolis Star, "This app wants you to report where people are and are not wearing a mask. Here's why.," 30 Sep. 2020 These are aggregate numbers—important, certainly, as a measure of the health of a representative democracy. Sue Halpern, The New Yorker, "How Democrats Are Registering New Voters During the Pandemic," 27 Sep. 2020 For every person kept out of work by benefits, that is less aggregate spending that is not made up elsewhere in the economy. Andrew Stuttaford, National Review, "The Capital Letter: Week of September 21," 25 Sep. 2020 Thus government was the only entity capable of increasing aggregate spending. Bruce Bartlett, The New Republic, "The Libertarian Ideas That Wrecked the Fed," 21 Sep. 2020 Remington Outdoor Company, which declared bankruptcy in July, has agreed to sell parts of its company to four bidders for an aggregate cost of about $159 million. Paul Gattis | Pgattis@al.com, al, "Remington sell-off begins; machinery taken from Huntsville plant," 29 Sep. 2020 Bullard suggested that the United States could reach the average level of aggregate national income of 2019 by the end of 2020. Nihal Krishan, Washington Examiner, "Full economic recovery possible by end of year, St. Louis Fed president says," 24 Sep. 2020 Comparing American history not with utopia but with the aggregate experience of mankind in this way engenders the greatest of all conservative virtues: gratitude. Cameron Hilditch, National Review, "Patriotic History Is Comparative History," 22 Sep. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The map available at healthweather.us uses aggregate data to identify when illness is high in an area and accurately predicts its spread. Mike Masterson, Arkansas Online, "OPINION | MASTERSON ONLINE: Mapping it out," 18 Oct. 2020 Instead of recruiting new participants, researchers planned to aggregate and analyze the data, resources, and bio-specimens of 18 previous studies, for a total study population of 20,000 Black women with breast cancer. Tonya Russell, Allure, "How Black Women With Breast Cancer Navigate a Biased System," 16 Oct. 2020 Companies that aggregate data generated by mobile apps and connected devices are also targets. Leigh Kamping-carder, WSJ, "Hackers Eye Their Next Targets, From Schools to Cars," 8 Oct. 2020 Clearly, our ability as a nation to aggregate correct data amid COVID-19 has led to confusion among lawmakers and citizens alike. Chris Krug, Washington Examiner, "Data sheds new light on Michigan governor’s handling of nursing home illnesses amid coronavirus," 5 Oct. 2020 Alongside that clue, Ms. Hart announced a new website meant to aggregate public police information about the case and encourage tips from the community. Robert Kolker, New York Times, "The Gilgo Beach Murders Were a Cold Case. Then a New Police Chief Arrived.," 25 Sep. 2020 The database is searchable by district and school name, but does not aggregate information, like how many cases are in districts statewide. Emily Bamforth, cleveland, "See Ohio K-12 school coronavirus data for public, private and community schools," 17 Sep. 2020 The standard economic literature that immigration increases aggregate wealth, and has minimal impact on low-wage workers, is presented as uncontroversial and unchallenged, despite a nominal nod to restrictionists such as George Borjas. Razib Khan, National Review, "One Billion Americans: A Contrarian Liberal Argues for Mass Immigration," 12 Sep. 2020 More than 380,000 had no power in Louisiana and over 90,000 in Texas as of 6:30 a.m. (7:30 a.m. ET), according to PowerOutage.us, a project created to track, record, and aggregate power outages across the U.S. NBC news, "Storm surge doesn’t appear to be as high as forecast," 27 Aug. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The institute then awarded UConn a grant to conduct research on the effects of the mineral pyrrhotite on concrete aggregate. Steven Goode, courant.com, "Funding for crumbling foundations study already paying dividends for condo owners," 26 Oct. 2020 It’s part of an attempt to replace the fair in aggregate. Henry Gass, The Christian Science Monitor, "Drive-thru Texas state fair: fried Oreos, yes. Baby animals, no.," 15 Oct. 2020 Homegrown Players on the Supplemental Roster may earn in aggregate each year up to $125,000 above the Reserve Minimum Salary ($63,547 in 2020) or the Senior Minimum Salary ($81,375 in 2020). Pat Brennan, The Enquirer, "FC Cincinnati announces GK Beckham Sunderland as first-ever academy signing," 14 Oct. 2020 On Saturday, the Quakes lost 6-1 to the Portland Timbers, an 11-1 aggregate over the past two games. Chronicle News Services, SFChronicle.com, "Quakes, sinking fast, are blown out again, this time at Colorado," 23 Sep. 2020 The announcement was made Thursday, and included a statewide aggregate. Shelby Stewart, Houston Chronicle, "Thousands of Texas students and staff have tested positive for COVID since school started," 18 Sep. 2020 Thursday’s announcement, which only included a statewide aggregate, is the first attempt to track novel coronavirus cases in Texas schools; a district-level breakdown will be available next week, according to TEA spokesperson Jake Kobersky. Corbett Smith, Dallas News, "More than 4,500 students and staff in Texas schools have tested positive for COVID-19 since the start of the school year," 17 Sep. 2020 According to an aggregate of polls from RealClearPolitics, President Trump is leading Democratic rival Joe Biden by more than 3 percentage points in Texas. Megan Henney, Fox News, "Texas governor faces third lawsuit over limit on mail ballot drop-off sites," 7 Oct. 2020 As of Friday, the former vice president led Mr. Trump by 6.5 percentage points in the aggregate of polls, compared with Mrs. Clinton’s 3-point lead at the same point four years ago. Aaron Zitner, WSJ, "Biden Holds Bigger September Poll Lead Than Clinton Did," 26 Sep. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'aggregate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of aggregate

Adjective

15th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for aggregate

Adjective

Middle English aggregat, borrowed from Latin aggregātus, past participle of aggregāre "to cause to flock together, join, include, lump together," from ad- ad- + -gregāre, verbal derivative of greg-, grex "flock, herd, group" — more at gregarious

Verb

Middle English aggregaten, borrowed from Latin aggregātus, past participle of aggregāre "to cause to flock together, join" — more at aggregate entry 1

Noun

Middle English aggregat, borrowed from Medieval Latin aggregātus, noun derivative of Latin aggregātus, past participle of aggregāre "to cause to flock together, join" — more at aggregate entry 1

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Time Traveler for aggregate

Time Traveler

The first known use of aggregate was in the 15th century

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Statistics for aggregate

Last Updated

27 Oct 2020

Cite this Entry

“Aggregate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/aggregate. Accessed 30 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for aggregate

aggregate

adjective
How to pronounce aggregate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of aggregate

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: formed by adding together two or more amounts

aggregate

verb
How to pronounce aggregate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of aggregate (Entry 2 of 3)

formal
: to join or combine into a single group
: to equal a specified number or amount

aggregate

noun
How to pronounce aggregate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of aggregate (Entry 3 of 3)

formal : a total amount

aggregate

verb
ag·​gre·​gate | \ ˈa-gri-ˌgāt How to pronounce aggregate (audio) \
aggregated; aggregating

Kids Definition of aggregate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to collect or gather into a mass or whole The particles of sand aggregated into giant dunes.

aggregate

noun
ag·​gre·​gate | \ ˈa-gri-gət How to pronounce aggregate (audio) \

Kids Definition of aggregate (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a mass or body of units or parts The rock is an aggregate of several minerals.
2 : the whole sum or amount They won by an aggregate of 30 points.

aggregate

adjective
ag·​gre·​gate | \ ˈag-ri-gət How to pronounce aggregate (audio) \

Medical Definition of aggregate

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: formed by the collection of units or particles into a body, mass, or amount

Other Words from aggregate

aggregation \ ˌag-​ri-​ˈgā-​shən How to pronounce aggregation (audio) \ noun
It is now known that these calcifications represent focal aggregations of calcium hydroxyapatite … Medical Radiography & Photography, 1982

aggregate

transitive verb
ag·​gre·​gate | \ -ˌgāt How to pronounce aggregate (audio) \
aggregated; aggregating

Medical Definition of aggregate (Entry 2 of 3)

: to collect or gather into a mass or whole aggregated human albumin

aggregate

noun
ag·​gre·​gate | \ -gət How to pronounce aggregate (audio) \

Medical Definition of aggregate (Entry 3 of 3)

: a mass or body of units or parts somewhat loosely associated with one another

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aggregate

adjective
ag·​gre·​gate | \ ˈa-grə-gət How to pronounce aggregate (audio) \

Legal Definition of aggregate

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: taken as a total aggregate liability

aggregate

verb
ag·​gre·​gate | \ ˈa-grə-ˌgāt How to pronounce aggregate (audio) \
aggregated; aggregating

Legal Definition of aggregate (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to combine or gather into a whole class members may aggregate their individual claims — compare join
2 : to amount to an award aggregating $100,000

intransitive verb

: to form an aggregate they may not aggregate if their claims are regarded as “separate and distinct”— J. M. Landers et al.

aggregate

noun
ag·​gre·​gate | \ ˈa-grə-gət How to pronounce aggregate (audio) \

Legal Definition of aggregate (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : total amount may sue in federal court if the aggregate of the claims exceeds $75,000
2 : a whole made up of individual units the aggregate of operative facts

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