aggregate

adjective
ag·​gre·​gate | \ˈa-gri-gət \

Definition of aggregate 

(Entry 1 of 3)

: formed by the collection of units or particles into a body, mass, or amount : collective: such as

a(1) : clustered in a dense mass or head an aggregate flower

(2) : formed from several separate ovaries of a single flower aggregate fruit

b : composed of mineral crystals of one or more kinds or of mineral rock fragments

c : taking all units as a whole aggregate sales

aggregate

verb
ag·​gre·​gate | \ˈa-gri-ˌgāt \
aggregated; aggregating

Definition of aggregate (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to collect or gather into a mass or whole The census data were aggregated by gender.

2 : to amount to (a whole sum or total) : total audiences aggregating several million people

aggregate

noun
ag·​gre·​gate | \ˈa-gri-gət \

Definition of aggregate (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : a mass or body of units or parts somewhat loosely associated with one another Froth is an aggregate of tiny bubbles.

2 : the whole sum or amount : sum total spent an aggregate of 10 million dollars in advertising during the past three years

3a : a rock composed of mineral crystals of one or more kinds or of mineral rock fragments : an aggregate rock

b : any of several hard inert materials (such as sand, gravel, or slag) used for mixing with a cementing material to form concrete, mortar, or plaster

c : a clustered mass of individual soil particles varied in shape, ranging in size from a microscopic granule to a small crumb, and considered the basic structural unit of soil

in the aggregate

: considered as a whole : collectively Dividends for the year amounted in the aggregate to 25 million dollars.

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Other Words from aggregate

Adjective

aggregately adverb
aggregateness noun

Did You Know?

Noun

We added "aggregate" to our flock of Latin borrowings in the 15th century. It descends from "aggregare" ("to add to"), a Latin verb made up of the prefix ad- (which means "to," and which usually changes to "ag-" before a "g") and "greg-" or "grex" (meaning "flock"). "Greg-" also gave us "congregate," "gregarious," and "segregate." "Aggregate" is commonly employed in the phrase "in the aggregate," which means "considered as a whole" (as in the sentence "In the aggregate, the student's various achievements were sufficiently impressive to merit a scholarship"). "Aggregate" also has some specialized senses. For example, it is used for a mass of minerals formed into a rock and for a material, such as sand or gravel, used to form concrete, mortar, or plaster.

Examples of aggregate in a Sentence

Adjective

There were to be thirty-seven playgrounds, twenty schools. There were to be a hundred and thirty-three miles of street, paved with an inch and a half of No. 2 macadam on an aggregate base. — Joan Didion, New Yorker, 26 July 1993 Their success at opening up new sources of supply, generating and servicing demand, and connecting new markets with the processing industries of the Amsterdam entrepôt seemed … to belie the axiom of an inelastic aggregate volume of world trade—a zero-sum competition. — Simon Schama, The Embarrassment of Riches, 1988 The mulberry looks a bit like a raspberry. But the raspberry (along with the other brambles, members of the genus Rubus, such as the blackberry) is an aggregate fruit generated by a single, if complex, flower. — Raymond Sokolov, Natural History, October 1986 With Keynes, standard theory conceded that disequilibria might intrude upon the economy as a whole, but it held that these could be remedied by judicious stabilization of aggregate demand—that is, combined government and consumer purchasing power. — Robert Kuttner, Atlantic, February 1985 The university receives more than half its aggregate income from government sources. The team with the highest aggregate score wins.

Verb

The problem, in this case, is that the synergy creates incentives for segregation. Ethnic advertisers scour the TV schedule for shows and channels that "aggregate" viewers of the type the client wants to reach … — Tamar Jacoby, New Republic, 24 Jan. 2000 "We are good at aggregating eyeballs and delivering services," says Barry Schuler, the president of AOL Interactive Services, "and the Time Warner deal is a natural extension of that." — Barry Schuler, Fortune, 7 Feb. 2000 Pollsters, for the most part, know perfectly well what they are doing. One thing they are doing is aggregating and averaging ephemeral spasms of "mood" that may have commercial or political value. — Christopher Hitchens, Harper's, April 1992 … covered only if each of the corporations involved has capital, surplus and undivided profits aggregating more than $10 million … — Joe Sims et al., National Law Journal, 28 Jan. 1991 The Web site aggregates content from many other sites. over time, her petty thefts aggregated a significant shortfall in the company's books

Noun

In particular, a core of popular politically minded blogs known in the aggregate as the Blogosphere has been a beehive of furious activity. Or should I say a wasp's nest? — Steven Levy, Newsweek, 4 Oct. 2004 It's true that our lives are the aggregate of a lot of little things, that's precisely why, at least once a year, we need to ride the wave of something bigger and bolder than our own little humdrum existence. — Will Manley, Booklist, 1 Sept. 2002 Smallness of enterprises, as in the Japanese bicycle-manufacturing development, is an asset because smallness cuts down administrative and other overhead costs both in individual enterprises and in the aggregate, in comparison with the overhead costs of large operations. — Jane Jacobs, Cities and the Wealth of Nations, (1984) 1985 numerous episodes of pilferage, taken in the aggregate, can really add up to a significant sum
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

The increased borrowing means Treasurys now amount to almost 40% of the value in the leading bond market investment benchmark—the Bloomberg Barclays U.S. aggregate index—which fund managers use to gauge their success. Daniel Kruger, WSJ, "Bond Indexes Bend Under Weight of Treasury Debt," 28 Nov. 2018 Away goals are the first tiebreaker in the aggregate series, meaning the Sounders could advance with a 1-0 victory. Geoff Baker, The Seattle Times, "Sounders hope to avoid becoming latest MLS second-round playoff upset victim," 7 Nov. 2018 Other general usage data, such as aggregate usage of apps, etc. Sam Blum, Popular Mechanics, "Facebook Admits Its New Gadget Might Use Your Data for Ads After All," 17 Oct. 2018 What about blogs or RSS feeds that aggregate headlines in much the same way Google News does? James Vincent, The Verge, "Everything you need to know about Europe’s new copyright directive," 13 Sep. 2018 Despite winning the Premier League with record numbers of goals, wins and points last season, City lost 5-1 on aggregate to eventual runners-up Liverpool in the quarter-finals of the Champions League. SI.com, "Riyad Mahrez Believes Pep Guardiola Can Lead Manchester City to UEFA Champions League Glory," 13 July 2018 With the teams 2-2 on aggregate, Leganes advanced on away goals after winning the first leg 1-0. USA TODAY, "Madrid advances in Copa despite 2-2 draw against Numancia," 10 Jan. 2018 But beyond this aggregate information, the OCC has published nothing—naming no banks, not saying whether any were penalised financially, nor whether malpractice was concentrated among a few or was widespread. The Economist, "Other American banks may have misbehaved as Wells Fargo did. Which ones?," 14 June 2018 Similarly, the report gives aggregate information about security incidents, but doesn't offer any granularity for minor blips versus major catastrophes. Lily Hay Newman, WIRED, "The Bleak State of Federal Government Cybersecurity," 30 May 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Only about 1 percent of plastic waste collects at the surface; most of it aggregates at the floor of the ocean, where deep-sea sediments behave as a sink for the microplastics. Radhika Viswanathan, Vox, "Why Starbucks, Disney, and the EU are all shunning plastic straws," 24 Oct. 2018 There are many options for ways to know who's on the ballot, and a lot of sites aggregating quotes that summarize a candidate's stance. Amanda Mitchell, Marie Claire, "Who to Vote for in the 2018 Midterms: A Complete Guide to Figuring It Out," 13 Sep. 2018 At the request of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, the leading ACE researchers at UW-Madison aggregated five years of statewide data, from 2011 through 2015, and broke out results for the four ZIP codes that cover the City of Racine. John Schmid, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Foxconn's promised jobs boom could miss neighboring city Racine," 6 Apr. 2018 Klein’s website also aggregates how much each cruise line spends on lobbying; from 1997 to 2015, Carnival has spent $4.7 million, Royal Caribbean has spent $10 million. Aditi Shrikant, Vox, "The case against cruises," 15 Nov. 2018 After that the data is aggregated to record the number of website hits and visitors. Ian Paul, PCWorld, "Mullvad 2018 review: A fantastic VPN has a great new look," 17 Oct. 2018 Number two is noone's done it in a combination that aggregates pay TV, free to air, digital, social in one place. Georg Szalai, The Hollywood Reporter, "Discovery Int'l Boss on the Benefits, and Challenges, of Airing the Olympics Across Europe," 7 Feb. 2018 The Navy and Marine Corps increasingly explains that modern missions require more split or dis-aggregated operations. Kris Osborn, Fox News, "Navy pushes for more amphibious assault ships," 13 July 2018 VirusTotal already aggregates what over 70 antivirus vendors consider malware, so devs can how compare their apps against that list for a little peace of mind. Brian Barrett, WIRED, "Security News This Week: Carriers Stop Selling Location Data in a Rare Privacy Win," 23 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The aggregate number probably doesn’t reflect the market’s gloomy sentiment—prices in some housing estates have fallen more than 10% in just the past month. Jacky Wong, WSJ, "The World’s Priciest Property Market Is Getting (a Bit) Cheaper," 26 Nov. 2018 The beauty of art is that everyone has different opinions about it — and flattening that into an aggregate number may not be the most helpful measure anyhow. Alissa Wilkinson, Vox, "CinemaScore, Rotten Tomatoes, and movie audience scores, explained," 13 Aug. 2018 The 2017 report showed that Seattle’s low-wage payroll, in the aggregate, shrank. The Editorial Board, WSJ, "Seattle’s Fake Free Lunch," 31 Oct. 2018 Evolutionary biologists still debate what drove simple aggregates of cells to become more and more complex, leading to the wondrous diversity of life today. Elizabeth Pennisi, Science | AAAS, "The momentous transition to multicellular life may not have been so hard after all," 28 June 2018 However, according to an aggregate of polls by RealClearPolitics, the president’s overall approval rating is near 43%. Mike Miller, PEOPLE.com, "Jim Carrey Says '40% of the US Doesn’t Care' if President Trump 'Kidnaps' Babies," 20 June 2018 This starts off as a thick gel, but then hardens into a solid matrix that binds the aggregates together. The Economist, "Making buildings, cars and planes from materials based on plant fibres," 14 June 2018 Hoops Hype, the statistics/salary database and NBA news website, compiles and updates an aggregate of mock drafts; its latest predicted that Bridges would go ninth overall. Mike Sielski, Philly.com, "Villanova's Mikal Bridges would be perfect fit for Sixers, if they can get him | Mike Sielski," 13 June 2018 When the majority of social-media users aren’t willing to pay anything to promote their content (even though Facebook ad revenue is soaring in aggregate), a $5 boost can go far. Daniel Gallant, WSJ, "How to Beat the Zuckerberg Casino," 8 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'aggregate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of aggregate

Adjective

15th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for aggregate

Adjective

Middle English aggregat, borrowed from Latin aggregātus, past participle of aggregāre "to cause to flock together, join, include, lump together," from ad- ad- + -gregāre, verbal derivative of greg-, grex "flock, herd, group" — more at gregarious

Verb

Middle English aggregaten, borrowed from Latin aggregātus, past participle of aggregāre "to cause to flock together, join" — more at aggregate entry 1

Noun

Middle English aggregat, borrowed from Medieval Latin aggregātus, noun derivative of Latin aggregātus, past participle of aggregāre "to cause to flock together, join" — more at aggregate entry 1

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Last Updated

5 Dec 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for aggregate

The first known use of aggregate was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for aggregate

aggregate

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of aggregate

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: formed by adding together two or more amounts

aggregate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of aggregate (Entry 2 of 3)

: to join or combine into a single group

: to equal a specified number or amount

aggregate

noun

English Language Learners Definition of aggregate (Entry 3 of 3)

: a total amount

aggregate

verb
ag·​gre·​gate | \ˈa-gri-ˌgāt \
aggregated; aggregating

Kids Definition of aggregate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to collect or gather into a mass or whole The particles of sand aggregated into giant dunes.

aggregate

noun
ag·​gre·​gate | \ˈa-gri-gət \

Kids Definition of aggregate (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a mass or body of units or parts The rock is an aggregate of several minerals.

2 : the whole sum or amount They won by an aggregate of 30 points.

aggregate

adjective
ag·​gre·​gate | \ˈag-ri-gət \

Medical Definition of aggregate 

(Entry 1 of 3)

: formed by the collection of units or particles into a body, mass, or amount

Other Words from aggregate

aggregation \ˌag-​ri-​ˈgā-​shən \ noun
It is now known that these calcifications represent focal aggregations of calcium hydroxyapatite … Medical Radiography & Photography, 1982

aggregate

transitive verb
ag·​gre·​gate | \-ˌgāt \
aggregated; aggregating

Medical Definition of aggregate (Entry 2 of 3)

: to collect or gather into a mass or whole aggregated human albumin

aggregate

noun
ag·​gre·​gate | \-gət \

Medical Definition of aggregate (Entry 3 of 3)

: a mass or body of units or parts somewhat loosely associated with one another

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aggregate

adjective
ag·​gre·​gate | \ˈa-grə-gət \

Legal Definition of aggregate 

(Entry 1 of 3)

: taken as a total aggregate liability

aggregate

verb
ag·​gre·​gate | \ˈa-grə-ˌgāt \
aggregated; aggregating

Legal Definition of aggregate (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to combine or gather into a whole class members may aggregate their individual claims — compare join

2 : to amount to an award aggregating $100,000

intransitive verb

: to form an aggregate they may not aggregate if their claims are regarded as “separate and distinct”— J. M. Landers et al.

aggregate

noun
ag·​gre·​gate | \ˈa-grə-gət \

Legal Definition of aggregate (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : total amount may sue in federal court if the aggregate of the claims exceeds $75,000

2 : a whole made up of individual units the aggregate of operative facts

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