seed

noun
\ ˈsēd How to pronounce seed (audio) \
plural seed or seeds

Definition of seed

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a(1) : the grains or ripened ovules of plants used for sowing
(2) : the fertilized ripened ovule of a flowering plant containing an embryo and capable normally of germination to produce a new plant broadly : a propagative plant structure (such as a spore or small dry fruit)
b : a propagative animal structure:
(1) : milt, semen
(2) : a small egg (as of an insect)
(3) : a developmental form of a lower animal suitable for transplanting specifically : spat
c : the condition or stage of bearing seed in seed
2 : progeny
3 : a source of development or growth : germ sowed the seeds of discord
4 : something (such as a tiny particle or a bubble in glass) that resembles a seed in shape or size
5 : a competitor who has been seeded in a tournament the top seed
go to seed or run to seed
1 : to develop seed

seed

verb
seeded; seeding; seeds

Definition of seed (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to bear or shed seed
2 : to sow seed : plant

transitive verb

1a : to plant seeds in : sow seed a lawn with grass
b : to furnish with something that causes or stimulates growth or development
c : inoculate
d : to supply with nuclei (as of crystallization or condensation) especially : to treat (a cloud) with solid particles to convert water droplets into ice crystals in an attempt to produce precipitation
e : to cover or permeate by or as if by scattering something seeded [the] sea-lanes with thousands of magnetic mines— Otto Friedrich
3 : to extract the seeds from (fruit)
4a : to schedule (tournament players or teams) so that superior ones will not meet in early rounds
b : to rank (a contestant) relative to others in a tournament on the basis of previous record the top-seeded tennis star

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Other Words from seed

Noun

seed adjective
seeded \ ˈsē-​dəd How to pronounce seed (audio) \ adjective
seedless \ ˈsēd-​ləs How to pronounce seed (audio) \ adjective
seedlike \ ˈsēd-​ˌlīk How to pronounce seed (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms for seed

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

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Do you cede or seed control?

Verb

Cede means "to yield or grant typically by treaty." Most of the verb senses of seed are concerned with planting seeds (either literal, as of plants, or figuratively, as of ideas). However, the word may also be used to mean "to schedule (tournament players or teams) so that superior ones will not meet in early rounds." If you relinquish or yield something you are ceding it, and if you are organizing the participants in a tournament you are seeding them.

Examples of seed in a Sentence

Noun a packet of sunflower seeds He planted the seeds three inches apart. She raked the grass seed into the soil. The top seed won the tournament. Our team is the number one seed. She is ranked as the third seed. Verb We seeded the field with corn. These plants will seed late in the fall. After you wash and seed the peppers you can chop them.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The machine automated the separation of cotton lint from seed, replacing the slow and painstaking manual process of spinning cotton into fabric. Mariana Rivas, Dallas News, 4 June 2021 They're grown from seed and produce a profusion of blooms wherever they're planted. Southern Living, 4 June 2021 Crafting a tree from a seed or cutting can take 10 to 15 years or more. Richard A. Marini, San Antonio Express-News, 21 May 2021 The Bucks stole one game from the top seed when Michael Redd scored 40 points in a resounding win at the Bradley Center. Jr Radcliffe, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 21 May 2021 The Hornets lost their final five games, sliding from the No. 8 seed to No. 10 and forcing them to win road games rather than qualifying with just one win. Mark Heim | Mheim@al.com, al, 18 May 2021 The Jazz went from the sixth seed in the West, with a .611 winning percentage, to the top spot and a .722 winning percentage. Chris Fedor, cleveland, 18 May 2021 The Lakers have to play their way to a title from the No. 7 seed, but nobody will rule that out with James and Anthony Davis now healthy. Brian Mahoney, Star Tribune, 17 May 2021 Someone posted pictures of necklaces her mother had made from the seed’s years ago. Janet Carson, Arkansas Online, 16 May 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The San Diego Section uses MaxPreps’ rankings to seed its teams. John Maffei, San Diego Union-Tribune, 31 May 2021 The test places new limits on their ability to survive impacts in space—and potentially seed life on other planets. Jonathan O'callaghan, Science | AAAS, 18 May 2021 This column is the one that tells you when to seed or put transplants outside. oregonlive, 1 May 2021 Our students study together, share ideas and seed new opportunities for future collaboration. Chelsey Cox, USA TODAY, 22 May 2021 The money comes from $150 million that state lawmakers allocated in December to seed the program, which partially reimburses landlords when tenants fall behind due to the coronavirus pandemic. Jamie Goldberg, oregonlive, 29 Apr. 2021 The larvae produced in this annual spawning would eventually settle and start dividing to seed new polyps. Alla Katsnelson, Smithsonian Magazine, 6 Apr. 2021 Providing more relief aid to businesses opened in the last year would help seed economic growth later this year and beyond, in Reese's view. Aimee Picchi, CBS News, 31 Mar. 2021 The museum and the artists are also donating $5,000 to seed a scholarship for Black students from Portland who want to become educators. Ayana Archie, The Courier-Journal, 19 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'seed.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of seed

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a(1)

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 2

History and Etymology for seed

Noun

Middle English, from Old English sǣd; akin to Old High German sāt seed, Old English sāwan to sow — more at sow

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Time Traveler for seed

Time Traveler

The first known use of seed was before the 12th century

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Statistics for seed

Last Updated

13 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Seed.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/seed. Accessed 15 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for seed

seed

noun

English Language Learners Definition of seed

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a small object produced by a plant from which a new plant can grow
: the beginning of something which continues to develop or grow
: a player or team that is ranked as one of the best in a competition (such as a tennis tournament) in order to be sure that the best players or teams do not play against each other in the early part of the competition

seed

verb

English Language Learners Definition of seed (Entry 2 of 2)

: to plant (an area of ground) with seeds
of a plant : to produce seeds
: to remove (seeds) from a fruit or vegetable

seed

noun
\ ˈsēd How to pronounce seed (audio) \

Kids Definition of seed

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a tiny developing plant that is enclosed in a protective coat usually along with a supply of food and that is able to develop under suitable conditions into a plant like the one that produced it
2 : a small structure (as a spore or a tiny dry fruit) other than a true seed by which a plant reproduces itself
3 : the descendants of one individual
4 : a source of development or growth : germ The comment planted a seed of doubt in my mind.

Other Words from seed

seeded \ ˈsē-​dəd \ adjective
seedless \ ˈsēd-​ləs \ adjective

seed

verb
seeded; seeding

Kids Definition of seed (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : sow entry 2 sense 2, plant Farmers seed the fields with wheat.
2 : to produce or shed seeds The plant seeds early.
3 : to take the seeds out of You have to wash and seed the peppers.

seed

noun
\ ˈsēd How to pronounce seed (audio) \
plural seed or seeds

Medical Definition of seed

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1a : the fertilized ripened ovule of a flowering plant containing an embryo and capable normally of germination to produce a new plant broadly : a propagative plant structure (as a spore or small dry fruit)
b : a propagative animal structure:
(1) : milt, semen
(2) : a small egg (as of an insect)
(3) : a developmental form of a lower animal — see seed tick
2 : a small usually glass and gold or platinum capsule used as a container for a radioactive substance (as radium or radon) to be applied usually interstitially in the treatment of cancer implantation of radon seeds for bladder cancer

Medical Definition of seed (Entry 2 of 3)

: to bear or shed seed

transitive verb

1 : to furnish with something that causes or stimulates growth or development
2 : inoculate
3 : to supply with nuclei (as of crystallization or condensation)

seed

adjective

Medical Definition of seed (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : selected or used to produce a new crop or stock seed virus
2 : left or saved for breeding a seed population

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