seed

noun
\ ˈsēd How to pronounce seed (audio) \
plural seed or seeds

Definition of seed

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a(1) : the grains or ripened ovules of plants used for sowing
(2) : the fertilized ripened ovule of a flowering plant containing an embryo and capable normally of germination to produce a new plant broadly : a propagative plant structure (such as a spore or small dry fruit)
b : a propagative animal structure:
(1) : milt, semen
(2) : a small egg (as of an insect)
(3) : a developmental form of a lower animal suitable for transplanting specifically : spat
c : the condition or stage of bearing seed in seed
2 : progeny
3 : a source of development or growth : germ sowed the seeds of discord
4 : something (such as a tiny particle or a bubble in glass) that resembles a seed in shape or size
5 : a competitor who has been seeded in a tournament the top seed
go to seed or run to seed
1 : to develop seed

seed

verb
seeded; seeding; seeds

Definition of seed (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to bear or shed seed
2 : to sow seed : plant

transitive verb

1a : to plant seeds in : sow seed a lawn with grass
b : to furnish with something that causes or stimulates growth or development
c : inoculate
d : to supply with nuclei (as of crystallization or condensation) especially : to treat (a cloud) with solid particles to convert water droplets into ice crystals in an attempt to produce precipitation
e : to cover or permeate by or as if by scattering something seeded [the] sea-lanes with thousands of magnetic mines— Otto Friedrich
3 : to extract the seeds from (fruit)
4a : to schedule (tournament players or teams) so that superior ones will not meet in early rounds
b : to rank (a contestant) relative to others in a tournament on the basis of previous record the top-seeded tennis star

Other Words from seed

Noun

seed adjective
seeded \ ˈsē-​dəd How to pronounce seed (audio) \ adjective
seedless \ ˈsēd-​ləs How to pronounce seed (audio) \ adjective
seedlike \ ˈsēd-​ˌlīk How to pronounce seed (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms for seed

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

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Do you cede or seed control?

Verb

Cede means "to yield or grant typically by treaty." Most of the verb senses of seed are concerned with planting seeds (either literal, as of plants, or figuratively, as of ideas). However, the word may also be used to mean "to schedule (tournament players or teams) so that superior ones will not meet in early rounds." If you relinquish or yield something you are ceding it, and if you are organizing the participants in a tournament you are seeding them.

Examples of seed in a Sentence

Noun a packet of sunflower seeds He planted the seeds three inches apart. She raked the grass seed into the soil. The top seed won the tournament. Our team is the number one seed. She is ranked as the third seed. Verb We seeded the field with corn. These plants will seed late in the fall. After you wash and seed the peppers you can chop them.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun So are the Colts and Titans, who can secure the AFC’s No. 1 seed with a win at Houston. Jay Ginsbach, Forbes, 5 Jan. 2022 The Bengals are currently the No. 3 seed in the AFC. Kelsey Conway, The Enquirer, 3 Jan. 2022 Kansas City can still secure the AFC's top seed with a victory and a loss by Tennessee, which plays at Houston. Mitch Stacy, orlandosentinel.com, 2 Jan. 2022 The Colts are currently the seventh seed and would play at Kansas City in the first round of the playoffs. Nat Newell, The Indianapolis Star, 2 Jan. 2022 In 2 1/2 weeks, the Chargers went from playing for first place in the AFC West to praying for a chance to be the conference’s No. 7 seed. Jeff Miller, Los Angeles Times, 1 Jan. 2022 The team, which currently holds a 23-9 record and is the top seed in the Eastern Conference, ultimately believed having Irving back, even if just for away games, was the right decision. Jason Duaine Hahn, PEOPLE.com, 29 Dec. 2021 Fournette wasn't the only key Bucs player to suffer a concerning injury with the team trying to secure a top playoff seed in the NFC and attempting to defend its Super Bowl title. Jim Reineking, USA TODAY, 21 Dec. 2021 Win, and Alabama would likely secure the No. 1 seed in the College Football Playoff for the second year in a row. Mike Rodak | Mrodak@al.com, al, 3 Dec. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb You often can get started with a few hundred dollars or less, or alternatively, seed a fund with tens of thousands of dollars. Russ Wiles, The Arizona Republic, 16 Dec. 2021 Given the irregular path that landed them on the court, there was skepticism that the appointments would do much if anything to chip away at longstanding institutional discrimination against women in Egypt and seed any meaningful change. New York Times, 20 Oct. 2021 But today’s announcement of The Accelerator seems to be an acknowledgement that there won’t be a ready market for its 1,000 qubit machines in 2023 unless IBM actively tries to seed it now by getting more customers ready to deploy the technology. Jeremy Kahn, Fortune, 22 Sep. 2021 The Dragon is the lowest-cost space vehicle for carrying humans ever developed, and is intended to seed future commerce in orbit with missions like this one. Tim Fernholz, Quartz, 14 Sep. 2021 Instead, the ever-accelerating goal of office tech and design has been to clear space in someone’s life, then immediately seed it with the potential for more productivity. Anne Helen Petersen, Wired, 9 Dec. 2021 Grasses that are locally common – mostly non-native – will seed into it over time, too. oregonlive, 31 Oct. 2021 His motion proposed that the city use $500,000 from this year's carryover budget, which gets allocated in the fall, to seed the fund. Cameron Knight, The Enquirer, 2 Aug. 2021 The WIAA Board of Control Wednesday unanimously voted to seed the tournament beginning next season. Mark Stewart, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 25 June 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'seed.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of seed

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a(1)

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 2

History and Etymology for seed

Noun

Middle English, from Old English sǣd; akin to Old High German sāt seed, Old English sāwan to sow — more at sow

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Time Traveler for seed

Time Traveler

The first known use of seed was before the 12th century

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Dictionary Entries Near seed

Seechelt

seed

seedage

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Statistics for seed

Last Updated

8 Jan 2022

Cite this Entry

“Seed.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/seed. Accessed 17 Jan. 2022.

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More Definitions for seed

seed

noun

English Language Learners Definition of seed

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a small object produced by a plant from which a new plant can grow
: the beginning of something which continues to develop or grow
: a player or team that is ranked as one of the best in a competition (such as a tennis tournament) in order to be sure that the best players or teams do not play against each other in the early part of the competition

seed

verb

English Language Learners Definition of seed (Entry 2 of 2)

: to plant (an area of ground) with seeds
: to produce seeds
: to remove (seeds) from a fruit or vegetable

seed

noun
\ ˈsēd How to pronounce seed (audio) \

Kids Definition of seed

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a tiny developing plant that is enclosed in a protective coat usually along with a supply of food and that is able to develop under suitable conditions into a plant like the one that produced it
2 : a small structure (as a spore or a tiny dry fruit) other than a true seed by which a plant reproduces itself
3 : the descendants of one individual
4 : a source of development or growth : germ The comment planted a seed of doubt in my mind.

Other Words from seed

seeded \ ˈsē-​dəd \ adjective
seedless \ ˈsēd-​ləs \ adjective

seed

verb
seeded; seeding

Kids Definition of seed (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : sow entry 2 sense 2, plant Farmers seed the fields with wheat.
2 : to produce or shed seeds The plant seeds early.
3 : to take the seeds out of You have to wash and seed the peppers.

seed

noun
\ ˈsēd How to pronounce seed (audio) \
plural seed or seeds

Medical Definition of seed

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1a : the fertilized ripened ovule of a flowering plant containing an embryo and capable normally of germination to produce a new plant broadly : a propagative plant structure (as a spore or small dry fruit)
b : a propagative animal structure:
(1) : milt, semen
(2) : a small egg (as of an insect)
(3) : a developmental form of a lower animal — see seed tick
2 : a small usually glass and gold or platinum capsule used as a container for a radioactive substance (as radium or radon) to be applied usually interstitially in the treatment of cancer implantation of radon seeds for bladder cancer

seed

intransitive verb

Medical Definition of seed (Entry 2 of 3)

: to bear or shed seed

transitive verb

1 : to furnish with something that causes or stimulates growth or development
2 : inoculate
3 : to supply with nuclei (as of crystallization or condensation)

seed

adjective

Medical Definition of seed (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : selected or used to produce a new crop or stock seed virus
2 : left or saved for breeding a seed population

More from Merriam-Webster on seed

Nglish: Translation of seed for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of seed for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about seed

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