progeny

noun

prog·​e·​ny ˈprä-jə-nē How to pronounce progeny (audio)
plural progenies
1
b
: offspring of animals or plants
2
3
: a body of followers, disciples, or successors

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The Lineage of Progeny

Progeny is the progeny of the Latin verb prōgignere, meaning "to beget." That Latin word is itself an offspring of the prefix pro-, meaning "forth," and gignere, which can mean "to beget" or "to bring forth." Gignere has produced a large family of English descendants, including benign (meaning "mild" or "harmless"), congenital (meaning "inherent"), engine, genius, germ, indigenous, ingenuous, and malign. Gignere even paired up with pro- again to produce a close relative of progeny: the noun progenitor can mean "an ancestor in the direct line," "a biologically ancestral form," or "a precursor or originator."

Examples of progeny in a Sentence

Many Americans are the progeny of immigrants. The small plants are the progeny of an oak tree. Their work is the progeny of many earlier studies.
Recent Examples on the Web Their names, blandly, are Yellow Mountain Goddess, Green Mountain Goddess, and Red Mountain God, and their progeny as the book unfolds include Yellow Vengeance, Lady Virescent Illumination, Fiery Dedication, and, of course, the Radiant Tiger People. Stephen Kearse, Washington Post, 17 July 2024 These misfit progeny get a shot at redemption, far from their nefarious parents, and attend a straitlaced boarding school teeming with the children of Disney sweethearts. Ew Staff, EW.com, 1 July 2024 These elites invest heavily both in their progeny and in establishing political control. Branko Milanovic, Foreign Affairs, 10 Dec. 2019 His progeny supposedly also includes Ulysses S. Grant, Sarah Palin, and Taylor Swift. Paige Williams, The New Yorker, 17 June 2024 See all Example Sentences for progeny 

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'progeny.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English progenie, borrowed from Anglo-French, borrowed from Latin prōgeniēs, from prōgen-, variant stem of prōgignere "to produce as offspring, bring into being" + -iēs, deverbal and denominal noun suffix — more at progenitor

First Known Use

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Time Traveler
The first known use of progeny was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near progeny

Cite this Entry

“Progeny.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/progeny. Accessed 25 Jul. 2024.

Kids Definition

progeny

noun
prog·​e·​ny ˈpräj-(ə-)-nē How to pronounce progeny (audio)
plural progenies
1
: human descendants : children
2
: offspring of animals or plants

Medical Definition

progeny

noun
prog·​e·​ny ˈpräj-(ə-)nē How to pronounce progeny (audio)
plural progenies
: offspring of animals or plants

More from Merriam-Webster on progeny

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