redress

verb
re·​dress | \ ri-ˈdres How to pronounce redress (audio) \
redressed; redressing; redresses

Definition of redress

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a(1) : to set right : remedy looked to charity, not to legislation, to redress social wrongs— W. R. Inge
(2) : to make up for : compensate
b : to remove the cause of (a grievance or complaint)
c : to exact reparation for : avenge
2 archaic
a : to requite (a person) for a wrong or loss
b : heal

redress

noun
re·​dress | \ ri-ˈdres How to pronounce redress (audio) , ˈrē-ˌdres \

Definition of redress (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : relief from distress
b : means or possibility of seeking a remedy without redress
2 : compensation for wrong or loss : reparation
3a : an act or instance of redressing

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from redress

Verb

redresser noun

Choose the Right Synonym for redress

Verb

correct, rectify, emend, remedy, redress, amend, reform, revise mean to make right what is wrong. correct implies taking action to remove errors, faults, deviations, defects. correct your spelling rectify implies a more essential changing to make something right, just, or properly controlled or directed. rectify a misguided policy emend specifically implies correction of a text or manuscript. emend a text remedy implies removing or making harmless a cause of trouble, harm, or evil. set out to remedy the evils of the world redress implies making compensation or reparation for an unfairness, injustice, or imbalance. redress past social injustices amend, reform, revise imply an improving by making corrective changes, amend usually suggesting slight changes amend a law , reform implying drastic change plans to reform the court system , and revise suggesting a careful examination of something and the making of necessary changes. revise the schedule

Examples of redress in a Sentence

Verb It is time to redress the injustices of the past. the belief that redressing a murder with another murder, even if carried out by the state, is not morally justified Noun the new skis were certainly an adequate redress for the lost snowboard
See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Doing so would both help redress a fundamental global inequity and also push against the soft-power inroads of Russia and China, countries whose own cheaper vaccines are being taken up across the developing world. Washington Post, "The pandemic leads to new forms of inequality," 19 Feb. 2021 To redress the resulting imbalance of power between the executive and legislative branches of government, President Biden should push for the repeal of the existing AUMFs and reaffirm Congress’s constitutional war powers. Erik Edstrom, The New Republic, "How Biden Can Transform America’s Foreign Policy," 16 Mar. 2021 This feeling is based on their desire to redress their past humiliations and to regain the past glories by becoming a world power. Manyin Li, National Review, "What China Really Wants: A New World Order," 7 Mar. 2021 According to the researchers, to redress the problem companies must create programs that identify promising Black workers and place them on a management track. Khristopher J. Brooks, CBS News, "It could take 100 years for Black employees to catch up in corporate America, study finds," 3 Mar. 2021 The most rigorous inquisition too is requisite to watch every inequality on its first appearance; and the most severe jurisdiction, to punish and redress it. WSJ, "Equality Goes With Freedom, Equity Doesn’t," 11 Mar. 2021 The Minnesota Department of Human Rights announced the settlement Monday in which Villaume also committed to take sweeping steps to redress past hiring practices and create an inclusive and welcoming workplace. Jackie Crosby, Star Tribune, "Eagan-based Villaume Industries to pay $90,000 fine over 'blatant gender discrimination'," 1 Mar. 2021 The government of West Germany paid reparations to the state of Israel to compensate for the Holocaust—and this has generally been considered a good-faith effort at least to acknowledge a harm that no amount of money could ever fully redress. Bruce Bartlett, The New Republic, "The Incalculable Debt That America Owes Black People," 26 Feb. 2021 The commission focused on policies to redress historic inequities and racial injustice caused by marijuana criminalization. John Bacon, USA TODAY, "Virginia becomes first Southern state to vote to legalize recreational marijuana use in nod to racial justice," 28 Feb. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Without some kind of restrictive legal covenant covering his giving, Huntsman seems to have little redress in clawing the money back. The Salt Lake Tribune, "James Huntsman isn’t the first to sue the LDS Church for a tithing refund. Do any of them stand a chance?," 4 Apr. 2021 It’s a First Amendment right to petition your government for redress of grievances. al, "Mo Brooks calls U.S. Capitol rioters ‘fools’; says sedition charges up to Justice Department," 27 Mar. 2021 This plan, however, is far from the direct payments that have come to characterize reparations — redress for slavery and the subsequent racial discrimination in the United States. NBC News, "Evanston is the first U.S. city to issue slavery reparations. Experts say it's a noble start.," 26 Mar. 2021 This would be significant for offering some redress for the rampant antiblackness that still exists among the Five Tribes and throughout Indian Country. Lisa Deaderick, San Diego Union-Tribune, "Descendants of enslaved Black people have right to Indigenous citizenship," 14 Mar. 2021 Shannon Liss-Riordan, a Boston attorney who has filed misclassification cases on behalf of gig workers and janitors said the decision should help California workers seeking redress over wage violations that occurred before April 2018. Carolyn Said, SFChronicle.com, "California high court: ‘ABC test’ for gig workers is retroactive, in blow to Uber, Lyft," 14 Jan. 2021 The bank would have faced a £37.2 million penalty if the FCA hadn’t taken into account its redress program. Sabela Ojea, WSJ, "U.K. Watchdog Fines Barclays Units $34.7 Million Over Treatment of Customers in Arrears," 15 Dec. 2020 The plaintiffs in the German case are seeking redress in U.S. courts because the German Advisory Commission on the return of cultural property seized as a result of Nazi persecution has ruled that the sales were not coerced. Ron Kampeas, sun-sentinel.com, "Trump administration calling for Holocaust restitution cases outside U.S. meets with skepticism," 9 Dec. 2020 The law sat dormant for nearly 200 years, but in recent decades has resurfaced as a tool of human rights activists seeking redress for victims abroad. Kristen Leigh Painter, Star Tribune, "Cargill argues in front of Supreme Court in child labor case," 1 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'redress.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of redress

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a(1)

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for redress

Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French redresser to set upright, restore, redress, from re- + dresser to set straight — more at dress

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about redress

Time Traveler for redress

Time Traveler

The first known use of redress was in the 14th century

See more words from the same century

Statistics for redress

Last Updated

7 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Redress.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/redress. Accessed 12 Apr. 2021.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for redress

redress

verb

English Language Learners Definition of redress

 (Entry 1 of 2)

formal : to correct (something that is unfair or wrong)

redress

noun

English Language Learners Definition of redress (Entry 2 of 2)

formal : something (such as money) that is given to someone to make up for damage, trouble, etc.

redress

verb
re·​dress | \ ri-ˈdres How to pronounce redress (audio) \
redressed; redressing

Kids Definition of redress

: to set right : remedy The court will redress an injustice.

redress

noun
re·​dress | \ ri-ˈdres, ˈrē-ˌdres How to pronounce redress (audio) \

Legal Definition of redress

1a : relief from distress
b : a means of obtaining a remedy
2 : compensation (as damages) for wrong or loss

Other Words from redress

redress \ ri-​ˈdres How to pronounce redress (audio) \ transitive verb

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on redress

What made you want to look up redress? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

The Exceptions Quiz III

  • one green toy robot amidst many red toy robots
  • Which of these words does not mean "nonsense"?
Name That Thing

Test your visual vocabulary with our 10-question challenge!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Typeshift

Anagram puzzles meet word search.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!