redress

verb
re·​dress | \ ri-ˈdres How to pronounce redress (audio) \
redressed; redressing; redresses

Definition of redress

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a(1) : to set right : remedy looked to charity, not to legislation, to redress social wrongs— W. R. Inge
(2) : to make up for : compensate
b : to remove the cause of (a grievance or complaint)
c : to exact reparation for : avenge
2 archaic
a : to requite (a person) for a wrong or loss
b : heal

redress

noun
re·​dress | \ ri-ˈdres How to pronounce redress (audio) , ˈrē-ˌdres \

Definition of redress (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : relief from distress
b : means or possibility of seeking a remedy without redress
2 : compensation for wrong or loss : reparation
3a : an act or instance of redressing

Other Words from redress

Verb

redresser noun

Choose the Right Synonym for redress

Verb

correct, rectify, emend, remedy, redress, amend, reform, revise mean to make right what is wrong. correct implies taking action to remove errors, faults, deviations, defects. correct your spelling rectify implies a more essential changing to make something right, just, or properly controlled or directed. rectify a misguided policy emend specifically implies correction of a text or manuscript. emend a text remedy implies removing or making harmless a cause of trouble, harm, or evil. set out to remedy the evils of the world redress implies making compensation or reparation for an unfairness, injustice, or imbalance. redress past social injustices amend, reform, revise imply an improving by making corrective changes, amend usually suggesting slight changes amend a law , reform implying drastic change plans to reform the court system , and revise suggesting a careful examination of something and the making of necessary changes. revise the schedule

Examples of redress in a Sentence

Verb It is time to redress the injustices of the past. the belief that redressing a murder with another murder, even if carried out by the state, is not morally justified Noun the new skis were certainly an adequate redress for the lost snowboard
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Buyers of Russian weapons have noticed how U.S.-made Himars missiles hit Russian targets with impunity nearly daily and how Moscow has turned to Iran for armed drones to try to redress its vulnerabilities on the battlefield. Yaroslav Trofimov, WSJ, 16 Sep. 2022 Harvard University President Lawrence Bacow said Tuesday that the prestigious school will set aside $100 million to study and redress its historic ties to slavery following the release of a committee report on the topic. Grayson Quay, The Week, 28 Apr. 2022 Harvard is setting up a $100 million endowment fund to redress the university's ties to slavery. Danielle Wallace, Fox News, 26 Apr. 2022 Harvard University has pledged $100 million to redress its historical ties to slavery. Camille Furst, WSJ, 26 Apr. 2022 Efforts to redress grievances as old as those in Shasta County should be considered on their merits, not dismissed out of hand. Kent Russell, Harper’s Magazine , 25 May 2022 Despite efforts by the state to redress inequity, California continues to have an outsized achievement gap separating poor children and English learners from more privileged students. Laura Newberry, Los Angeles Times, 22 Nov. 2021 During the past four decades, with Spain’s governments alternating between center-left and conservative Prime Ministers, efforts to redress some of the country’s more perverse Franco-era legacies have been fitful. Jon Lee Anderson, The New Yorker, 2 Nov. 2021 Then there is the drive to use that context to bring to light fashion stories and designers that have been overlooked, largely because of race or gender, and to redress those wrongs. New York Times, 6 May 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Defrauding investors is the financial crime for which the SEC can pursue redress and, upon a successful enforcement action, restitution. Ian Bogost, The Atlantic, 25 Aug. 2022 In a survey of people in 18 countries, over the last 12 months less than 50% of people living with HIV whose rights were abused sought legal redress. Mandeep Dhaliwal, STAT, 12 Aug. 2022 The agency ordered Digit to pay a $2.7 million penalty plus $68,145 in redress to customers who were denied reimbursement requests for overdraft fees. Emily Mason, Forbes, 11 Aug. 2022 First, the plaintiffs gave up the right to sue or seek legal redress against the Church of Scientology in perpetuity. Matt Ford, The New Republic, 27 July 2022 Through centuries of litigation, common carriage's core ideas — revolving around product consistency, equal access and consumer redress — were formalized and extended to other industries. Brian Fung, CNN, 8 June 2022 The bike rider might seek legal redress by pursuing the automaker of the autonomous vehicle. Lance Eliot, Forbes, 10 Aug. 2022 Victims of wrongful convictions who have their cases overturned often sue for redress, with payments varying from several thousand dollars to tens of millions. New York Times, 14 July 2022 The two movies are animated by revulsion at the prevalent American ethos and an absolute existential despair over the possibility of any corrective or practical redress. Richard Brod, The New Yorker, 13 Sep. 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'redress.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of redress

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a(1)

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for redress

Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French redresser to set upright, restore, redress, from re- + dresser to set straight — more at dress

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Time Traveler for redress

Time Traveler

The first known use of redress was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near redress

red republican

redress

redressment

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Statistics for redress

Last Updated

22 Sep 2022

Cite this Entry

“Redress.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/redress. Accessed 30 Sep. 2022.

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More Definitions for redress

redress

verb
re·​dress | \ ri-ˈdres How to pronounce redress (audio) \
redressed; redressing

Kids Definition of redress

: to set right : remedy The court will redress an injustice.

redress

noun
re·​dress | \ ri-ˈdres, ˈrē-ˌdres How to pronounce redress (audio) \

Legal Definition of redress

1a : relief from distress
b : a means of obtaining a remedy
2 : compensation (as damages) for wrong or loss

Other Words from redress

redress \ ri-​ˈdres How to pronounce redress (audio) \ transitive verb

More from Merriam-Webster on redress

Nglish: Translation of redress for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of redress for Arabic Speakers

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