move

verb
\ ˈmüv How to pronounce move (audio) \
moved; moving

Definition of move

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1a(1) : to go or pass to another place or in a certain direction with a continuous motion moved into the shade
(2) : to proceed toward a certain state or condition moving up the executive ladder
(3) : to become transferred during play checkers move along diagonally adjacent squares
(4) : to keep pace moving with the times
b : to start away from some point or place : depart It was getting late and I thought it was time to be moving.
c : to change one's residence or location decided to move to the city
2 : to carry on one's life or activities in a specified environment moves in the best circles
3 : to change position or posture : stir ordered him not to move
4 : to take action : act The time has come to make up your mind and move.
5a : to begin operating or functioning or working in a usual way pushed a button and the machine began moving
b : to show marked activity after a lull things really began to move
c : to move a piece (as in chess or checkers) during one's turn
6 : to make a formal request, application, or appeal moved that the meeting adjourn
7 : to change hands by being sold or rented goods that moved slowly
8 of the bowels : evacuate

transitive verb

1a(1) : to change the place or position of moved the chair to a different part of the room
(2) : to dislodge or displace from a fixed position : budge The knife had sunk deeply into the wood and couldn't be moved.
b : to transfer (something, such as a piece in chess) from one position to another moved the bishop to take the knight
2a(1) : to cause to go or pass from one place to another with a continuous motion move the flag slowly up and down
(2) : to cause to advance moved the troops closer to the enemy
b : to cause to operate or function : actuate this button moves the whole machine
c : to put into activity or rouse up from inactivity news that moved them from their torpor
3 : to cause to change position or posture moved his lips but not a sound was heard
4 : to prompt or rouse to the doing of something : persuade the report moved us to take action
5a : to stir the emotions, feelings, or passions of deeply moved by such kindness
b : to affect in such a way as to lead to an indicated show of emotion the story moved her to tears
6a obsolete : beg
b : to make a formal application to
7 : to propose formally in a deliberative assembly moved the adjournment motion
8 : to cause (the bowels) to void
9 : to cause to change hands through sale or rent The salesman moved three cars today.
move house
British : to change one's residence

move

noun

Definition of move (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : the act of moving a piece (as in chess)
b : the turn of a player to move
2a : a step taken especially to gain an objective : maneuver a move to end the dispute retiring early was a smart move
b : the action of moving from a motionless position
c : one of a pattern of dance steps
d : a change of residence or location
e : an agile or deceptive action especially in sports
on the move
1 : in a state of moving about from place to place
2 : in a state of moving ahead or making progress said that civilization is always on the move

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Choose the Right Synonym for move

Verb

move, actuate, drive, impel mean to set or keep in motion. move is very general and implies no more than the fact of changing position. moved the furniture actuate stresses transmission of power so as to work or set in motion. turbines actuated by waterpower drive implies imparting forward and continuous motion and often stresses the effect rather than the impetus. a ship driven aground by hurricane winds impel is usually figurative and suggests a great motivating impetus. a candidate impelled by ambition

Examples of move in a Sentence

Verb

He moved the chair closer to the table. It may be necessary to move the patient to intensive care. The breeze moved the branches of the trees. The branches moved gently in the breeze. She was unable to move her legs. She was so frightened that she could hardly move. I moved over so that she could sit next to me. We moved into the shade. The police were moving through the crowd telling people to move toward the exit. We could hear someone moving around upstairs.

Noun

He made a sudden move that scared away the squirrel. an athlete who has some good moves The policeman warned him not to make any false moves. He was afraid to make a move. No one is sure what his next move will be. He's preparing for his move to California.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Official guidelines now spell out victims’ rights and bar moving predatory priests. Washington Post, "Ex-clergyman says US priest in Philippines a known pedophile," 10 Sep. 2019 Instead of spending heavily on one player - Rodri's £62.8m move this summer is their record transfer - City prefer to spend slightly less heavily on pretty much every position in their entire squad. SI.com, "The 10 Most Expensive Squads in the Premier League," 10 Sep. 2019 His competitor already has a hold of him and is pushing hard, but Junior doesn’t move. Jill Langlois, Los Angeles Times, "In Brazil, land of beaches and samba, a sumo wrestling academy thrives," 10 Sep. 2019 Hillwood’s Midwest leader, Don Schoenheider, confirmed a tenant has leased the entire warehouse and will move there in October, before the holiday e-commerce rush. Lauren Zumbach, chicagotribune.com, "Amazon adds Skokie warehouse to growing delivery network in Illinois," 9 Sep. 2019 Some of these tasks might include set-up, registration, moving supplies around, and making sure meal-packing volunteers are safe and comfortable. Patrick May, The Mercury News, "Remembering 9/11: Events in California to honor 18th anniversary of terror attacks," 9 Sep. 2019 The Conservative rebels have joined with the five opposition parties (one Scottish and two Northern Irish parties and the Labour and Liberal Democratic parties) to deny the government’s move to dissolve Parliament for new elections. Conrad Black, National Review, "The Roots of Brexit," 9 Sep. 2019 With a master’s degree in management, Bivin was later named as Powlus’ replacement when the latter moved into an associate athletic director’s role following four years in player development. Mike Berardino, Indianapolis Star, "His football career didn't pan out — but Hunter Bivin is determined to guide Notre Dame's next generation," 9 Sep. 2019 Dry, hot and windy conditions, especially on the east side of the state, are still anticipated moving into fall. Janelle Retka, The Seattle Times, "Wildfire season in Washington more manageable than previous years — but it’s not over yet," 9 Sep. 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports the move came last week. BostonGlobe.com, "The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports the move came last week.," 11 Sep. 2019 The move came after a punishing evening in which his government lost two parliamentary votes adding to his four losses from last week. Luke Mcgee, CNN, "Boris Johnson is out of Brexit ideas," 10 Sep. 2019 When McDonald's spent over $300 million on big data crunching startup Dynamic Yield earlier this year, the move came as something of a surprise. Wired, "McDonald's Doubles Down on Tech With Voice AI Acquisition," 10 Sep. 2019 The move comes after former city manager Dave Hansen resigned amid criticism for his response to a May mass shooting by a city employee. Washington Post, "Man, 19, fatally shot in Northeast Washington," 9 Sep. 2019 The unusual move comes amid a flurry of high-profile incidents in the SEAL teams, prompting attempts by Navy leadership to bring the elite commandos under control. Dave Philipps, New York Times, "Three SEAL Team Leaders Fired for Breakdowns in Discipline," 6 Sep. 2019 The move also comes amid a leadership exodus and other signs of turmoil at the NRA. Cnn.com Wire Service, The Mercury News, "NRA rips San Francisco Board of Supervisors after being labeled a ‘domestic terrorist organization," 5 Sep. 2019 The move comes just a few weeks after Rhoades and Harrell were named in a civil rights lawsuit filed by a former patrol captain who alleged the two were involved in a cheating and corruption scandal at the agency. USA TODAY, "Cat burglar, prison bats, USS Arizona Memorial: News from around our 50 states," 4 Sep. 2019 The move comes just days after The Los Angeles Times editorial board penned a scathing criticism of the bill. Bryn Elise Sandberg, The Hollywood Reporter, "California Assemblywoman Pauses Bill Aiming to Lure Film/TV Production From Georgia," 30 Aug. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'move.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of move

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1a(1)

Noun

1656, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for move

Verb and Noun

Middle English, from Anglo-French mover, moveir, from Latin movēre; probably akin to Sanskrit mīvati he moves, pushes

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Statistics for move

Last Updated

13 Sep 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for move

The first known use of move was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for move

move

verb

English Language Learners Definition of move

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to cause (something or someone) to go from one place or position to another
: to go from one place or position to another
: to cause (your body or a part of your body) to go from one position to another

move

noun

English Language Learners Definition of move (Entry 2 of 2)

: an act of moving your body or a part of your body
: an action
: the act of moving to a different place

move

verb
\ ˈmüv How to pronounce move (audio) \
moved; moving

Kids Definition of move

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to go from one place to another Let's move into the shade.
2 : to change the place or position of : shift Move your chair closer.
3 : to set in motion Come on, move your feet.
4 : to cause to act : persuade Your speech moved me to change my opinion.
5 : to affect the feelings of The sad story moved me to tears.
6 : to change position Stop moving until I finish cutting your hair.
7 : to change residence We moved to Illinois.
8 : to suggest according to the rules in a meeting I move to adjourn.

move

noun

Kids Definition of move (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the action of changing position, place, or residence a sudden move We're excited about our move to a new state.
2 : the act of moving a piece in a game
3 : the turn of a player to move It's your move.
4 : an action taken to accomplish something a career move

move

verb
\ ˈmüv How to pronounce move (audio) \
moved; moving

Medical Definition of move

intransitive verb

1 : to go or pass from one place to another
2 of the bowels : to eject fecal matter : evacuate

transitive verb

1 : to change the place or position of
2 : to cause (the bowels) to void

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move

verb
moved; moving

Legal Definition of move

intransitive verb

: to make a motion moved to seize the property

transitive verb

: to request (a court) by means of a motion moved the court to vacate the order

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More from Merriam-Webster on move

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with move

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for move

Spanish Central: Translation of move

Nglish: Translation of move for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of move for Arabic Speakers

Comments on move

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