mob

noun
\ ˈmäb How to pronounce mob (audio) \

Definition of mob

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a large and disorderly crowd of people especially : one bent on riotous or destructive action
2 informal : a large number of people a mob of shoppers clogged the aisles a team greeted by mobs of fans
3 : a criminal set : gang especially, often capitalized : mafia sense 1 a member of the Mob a mob informant
4 old-fashioned : the common people : masses
5 chiefly Australia : a flock, drove, or herd of animals

mob

verb
mobbed; mobbing

Definition of mob (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to crowd about and attack or annoy mobbed by autograph hunters a crow mobbed by songbirds
2 : to crowd into or around customers mob the stores on sale days

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Other Words from mob

Noun

mobbish \ ˈmä-​bish How to pronounce mobbish (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms for mob

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

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Choose the Right Synonym for mob

Noun

crowd, throng, horde, crush, mob mean an assembled multitude. crowd implies a close gathering and pressing together. a crowd gathered throng and horde suggest movement and pushing. a throng of reporters a horde of shoppers crush emphasizes the compactness of the group, the difficulty of individual movement, and the attendant discomfort. a crush of fans mob implies a disorderly crowd with the potential for violence. an angry mob

Examples of mob in a Sentence

Noun The angry mob smashed store windows and attacked people on the streets. The police had to be called in to handle the growing mob. He was jailed for his dealings with the Mob. Verb The actor's fans mobbed him wherever he went. Shoppers mobbed the stores during the holidays.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Chris Rock stars as Loy Cannon, a mob boss battling the Italians – led by Josto Fadda (Jason Schwartzman) – who, over three decades (as seen in an extended prologue), muscled out the Irish and Jews. Gary Levin, USA TODAY, "'Fargo' Season 4: Chris Rock on 'playing my grandfather' as a Kansas City mob boss," 24 Sep. 2020 Donald Trump likes to present himself as a law-and-order president standing athwart an angry mob. Monica Hesse, Washington Post, "This crowd of RBG fans showed Trump what law and order really sounds like," 25 Sep. 2020 Brad was onscreen looking the same but a touch older, as a braying mob of hornies salivated at the door, ready to succumb to his pure Brad Pitt-ness. Raven Smith, Vogue, "The Curious Case of Brad Pitt," 24 Sep. 2020 For many militia members, mob rule in the streets comprises the real threat to democracy. Noah Robertson, The Christian Science Monitor, "Armed protesters in America create stress test for police," 22 Sep. 2020 The show also sheds light on the Tulsa massacre, a tragic incident that took place in 1921 when a mob of white residents attacked Black residents and businesses in the Greenwood District of Tulsa, Oklahoma. Sarah Midkiff, refinery29.com, "Regina King Changed Her Emmys Outfit To Make An Important Statement," 21 Sep. 2020 The proclamation, that is, of the reign of the goddess Reason, that is, mob rule. David Mamet, National Review, "Hamlet and Oedipus Meet the Zombies," 17 Sep. 2020 Would the writer advocate allowing an angry mob of people to burn down her house so as to not make matters worse? Star Tribune, "Readers Write: Civil unrest, Trump's comments on veterans," 8 Sep. 2020 President Trump declined to condemn the actions of a teenager accused of killing two people during a protest of police brutality last week, saying instead that Kyle Rittenhouse could have been killed by an angry mob. Rob Crilly, Washington Examiner, "Trump says Kyle Rittenhouse could have been killed by angry protesters," 31 Aug. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb There are, of course, alternatives to mob action or meekly following unjust laws and practices. Star Tribune, "Readers Write: Minneapolis City Council President Lisa Bender, civil unrest, Bottineau Corridor light rail, strugging Chambers of Commerce, State Fair," 4 Sep. 2020 The Seawolves at game’s end poured off their bench to mob their goaltender, Chris King, an East High kid. Doyle Woody, Anchorage Daily News, "Once the toast of the town, UAA hockey is toast, and it’s sad but not surprising," 26 Aug. 2020 Rome’s Piazza Navona and Trevi Fountain, usually mobbed in early May with visitors speaking all kinds of languages, are nearly vacant. Alex Scimecca, Fortune, "Photo essay: Italy reopens museums and churches," 21 May 2020 In March 1960, Elvis Presley, then wrapping up his military service, stopped at the airport for a few hours and was mobbed by his fans. David D. Kirkpatrick, New York Times, "Inside the Military’s 5-Star Layovers at a Trump Resort in Scotland," 12 Sep. 2019 Had this been a normal race, his win would have launched a celebration with confetti and mobbing fans. Roberto Baldwin, Car and Driver, "Is This Real Life? E-Racing Takes the Wheel," 16 May 2020 The entire North Shore team rushed to mob Carter in the end zone, but then both teams had to wait to see which team won the state championship because the play went under video review. Dallas News, "SportsDay staffers pick the best games they’ve ever covered: Seven overtimes, #txhsfb drama and upsets for the ages," 20 Apr. 2020 Tourism is a surprisingly small part of the economy, even if Paris seems to be perpetually mobbed by people wielding selfie sticks. Jack Ewing, New York Times, "Some Countries Are Better Armored for Epidemics Than Others," 19 Mar. 2020 In Europe, one viral video that was shared on WhatsApp claimed to show shoppers mobbing a store in the Netherlands. Craig Timberg, Washington Post, "In fast-moving pandemic, sources of falsehoods spread by text, email, WhatsApp, and TikTok elude authorities," 16 Mar. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'mob.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of mob

Noun

1688, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1696, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for mob

Noun

Latin mobile vulgus vacillating crowd

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Learn More about mob

Statistics for mob

Last Updated

16 Oct 2020

Cite this Entry

“Mob.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mob. Accessed 23 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for mob

mob

noun
How to pronounce mob (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of mob

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a large group or crowd of people who are angry or violent or difficult to control
informal : a large number of people
informal : a secret organized group of criminals

mob

verb

English Language Learners Definition of mob (Entry 2 of 2)

of a group of people : to move close to (someone) in an excited way : to crowd around (someone) in an aggressive, excited, or annoying way
: to come together in (a place) with many other people

mob

noun
\ ˈmäb How to pronounce mob (audio) \

Kids Definition of mob

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a rowdy excited crowd
2 : the people of a society who are poor and uneducated

mob

verb
mobbed; mobbing

Kids Definition of mob (Entry 2 of 2)

: to crowd about in an aggressive, excited, or annoying way The star was mobbed by fans.

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Comments on mob

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