throng

noun
\ ˈthrȯŋ \

Definition of throng 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a multitude of assembled persons

b : a large number : host

2a : a crowding together of many persons

b : a pressing increase of activity this throng of business —S. R. Crockett

throng

verb
thronged; thronging\ˈthrȯŋ-iŋ \

Definition of throng (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to crowd upon : press a celebrity thronged by fans

2 : to crowd into : pack shoppers thronging the streets

intransitive verb

: to crowd together in great numbers

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Synonyms for throng

Synonyms: Noun

army, crowd, crush, drove, flock, herd, horde, host, legion, mass, mob, multitude, press, rout, swarm

Synonyms: Verb

crowd, flock, mob, swarm

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Choose the Right Synonym for throng

Noun

crowd, throng, horde, crush, mob mean an assembled multitude. crowd implies a close gathering and pressing together. a crowd gathered throng and horde suggest movement and pushing. a throng of reporters a horde of shoppers crush emphasizes the compactness of the group, the difficulty of individual movement, and the attendant discomfort. a crush of fans mob implies a disorderly crowd with the potential for violence. an angry mob

Examples of throng in a Sentence

Noun

grabbed a megaphone and addressed the vast throng

Verb

Shoppers thronged the mall for the sales. fans thronged the field to celebrate the win
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Among the throng of people was Kyaw Soe Oo’s young daughter who waited hopefully for her father to arrive. Oliver Slow / Yangon, Time, "Judge Rules That Two Reuters Journalists Detained in Myanmar Will Stand Trial," 9 July 2018 As anger rose among the throngs of men, police struggled to disperse the growing crowds, firing rubber bullets and trying to corral rioters into certain sections of the city. Timothy Mclaughlin, WIRED, "How Facebook’s Rise Fueled Chaos and Confusion in Myanmar," 6 July 2018 But even among this throng of flashy ailments, Detroit’s car-insurance problem looks egregious. The Economist, "Why Detroit is the most expensive city in America to buy car insurance," 5 July 2018 By then, Thai officials had moved the relatives indoors to a private area, and the throng of journalists covering the search have mostly been kept from speaking to them. New York Times, "Thailand Cave Rescue Turns to How to Extract Trapped Soccer Team," 3 July 2018 The charges include one hate crime act that led to the death of Heather Heyer, a counterprotester who was run over when Fields allegedly drove his car into a throng of anti-racist marchers. Joe Heim, Washington Post, "Man accused of driving into crowd at ‘Unite the Right’ rally charged with federal hate crimes," 27 June 2018 Your information will be used as described in our Privacy Policy KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Evan Gattis arrived and smashed his left foot upon home plate, the throng of baserunners his latest blast brought in eagerly awaiting his arrival. Chandler Rome, Houston Chronicle, "Evan Gattis' grand slam lifts Astros over Royals," 15 June 2018 The larger of two images is a black-and-white, overhead shot of a throng of raucous, happy, young black people, probably at a Michael Jackson concert. Sharon Mizota, latimes.com, "Review: Photographer Todd Gray traces African roots," 9 July 2018 Both ride-hailing companies have joined the throng of a dozen firms vying to unleash electric scooters on the streets of San Francisco. Carolyn Said, SFChronicle.com, "How Uber and Lyft are scooting their way to global domination of transport," 23 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Outside the castle walls, tens of thousands of well-wishers thronged the streets, cheering, waving and whooping as the retinue passed, escorted by mounted members of the Royal Household Cavalry in full regalia. Christina Boyle, latimes.com, "Joyous crowds greet newlyweds Prince Harry and Meghan Markle after their marriage ceremony," 19 May 2018 Venezuelans thronged the banks to get rid of the notes, but the promised larger denominations never showed up. The Economist, "Venezuelan cash is almost worthless, but also scarce," 12 July 2018 Mass demonstrations against voter fraud in the December parliamentary elections thronged Russian cities and spooked the Kremlin. Daniel Beer, New York Times, "Does Vladimir Putin Speak for the Russian People?," 6 July 2018 Visitors thronged throughout the Del Mar Fairgrounds under spotless blue skies, which slowed foot traffic from the barns to the midway to the outlying rides to the ferris wheel. Gary Robbins, sandiegouniontribune.com, "Temperature could hit 117 degrees in San Diego County during weekend heat wave," 4 July 2018 Under the junta’s watch, GDP growth has risen to 4%, exports are at a seven-year high and a record 35 million tourists thronged Thailand’s beaches and temples in 2017. Time, "Thailand’s Leader Promised to Restore Democracy. Instead He's Tightening His Grip," 21 June 2018 According to the Los Angeles Times, between 300 and 500 people thronged Melrose Avenue near Spaulding, blocking traffic. NBC News, "As fans mourn rapper XXXTentacion's death, police search for his killer," 20 June 2018 Last week's road rage incident took place blocks away from where hundreds were thronging to Avid Cider's annual carnival. The Bulletin, OregonLive.com, "Road rage victim commits road rage herself, police say," 9 June 2018 Market Street was transformed into a wine walkabout Thursday evening, June 7, as hundreds of wine enthusiasts thronged the streets in search of the perfect sip of vino. Patricia Dillon, Houston Chronicle, "Wine & Food Week: Market Street transformed into wine walkabout," 9 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'throng.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of throng

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for throng

Noun

Middle English throng, thrang "mass, press," going back to Old English *thrang or gethrang (with ge-, collective prefix), going back to West Germanic *þrang- (whence Middle Dutch gedranc "crowd, press," dranc, drang "pressure," Old High German gidrang "crowd, mass"), noun ablaut derivative from the base of Germanic *þrengan-,*þrenhan- "to press" (whence Old Saxon thringan "to press, urge," Old High German dringan, thringan, Old Norse þryngva "to press, crowd," Gothic þreihan), going back to dialectal Indo-European *trenk- "press," whence also Lithuanian trenkiù, treñkti "to push roughly, fling"

Verb

Middle English thrangen, throngen, probably derivative of throng, thrang throng entry 1, replacing thringen, going back to Old English thringan

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Statistics for throng

Last Updated

10 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for throng

The first known use of throng was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for throng

throng

noun

English Language Learners Definition of throng

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a large group of people

throng

verb

English Language Learners Definition of throng (Entry 2 of 2)

: to go to (a place) in a large group or in large numbers

: to gather in a crowd or in great numbers

throng

noun
\ ˈthrȯŋ \

Kids Definition of throng

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a large group of people : crowd

throng

verb
thronged; thronging

Kids Definition of throng (Entry 2 of 2)

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Comments on throng

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