rob

verb
\ ˈräb How to pronounce rob (audio) \
robbed; robbing

Definition of rob

transitive verb

1a(1) : to take something away from by force : steal from
(2) : to take personal property from by violence or threat
b(1) : to remove valuables without right from (a place)
(2) : to take the contents of (a receptacle)
c : to take away as loot : steal rob jewelry
2a : to deprive of something due, expected, or desired
b : to withhold unjustly or injuriously

intransitive verb

: to commit robbery

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Other Words from rob

robber noun

Can rob mean 'to steal'?: Usage Guide

Transitive sense 1c, in which the direct object is the thing stolen, is sometimes considered to be wrong, or perhaps archaic. The sense has been in use since the 13th century and is found in earlier literature. contrive to rob the honey and subvert the hive — John Dryden It is still in use though not as common as other senses. then robbed $100 after the clerk fled Springfield (Massachusetts) Morning Union

Examples of rob in a Sentence

Someone tried to rob me. The cashier was robbed at gunpoint.
Recent Examples on the Web Its farmers have rebelled, worried that losing any more water will rob them of a chance for a healthy harvest next year. Natalie Kitroeff, Star Tribune, "'This is a war': Cross-border fight over water erupts in Mexico," 17 Oct. 2020 Its farmers have rebelled, worried that losing any more water will rob them of a chance for a healthy harvest next year. Natalie Kitroeff, Star Tribune, "'This is a war': Cross-border fight over water erupts in Mexico," 17 Oct. 2020 But today, our repetitive patterns can rob us of our creative potential … and even our happiness. Josh Linkner, Detroit Free Press, "That sensible routine you follow might be wrecking your creativity, and happiness," 31 Oct. 2020 Its farmers have rebelled, worried that losing any more water will rob them of a chance for a healthy harvest next year. Natalie Kitroeff, Star Tribune, "'This is a war': Cross-border fight over water erupts in Mexico," 17 Oct. 2020 The lack of fans in Beaver Stadium will rob the Halloween night game at Penn State of its usual White Out intensity. Nathan Baird, cleveland, "Ohio State football stumbles early, finishes strong in 52-17 victory over Nebraska to open 2020 season," 24 Oct. 2020 Its farmers have rebelled, worried that losing any more water will rob them of a chance for a healthy harvest next year. Natalie Kitroeff, New York Times, "‘This Is a War’: Cross-Border Fight Over Water Erupts in Mexico," 14 Oct. 2020 Opponents argue that a lottery system will rob deserving children of spots at the prestigious school, which is often ranked the No. 1 public high school in the country. Washington Post, "Fairfax school board poised to eliminate admissions test at Thomas Jefferson High School," 8 Oct. 2020 But Trump's test result is likely to rob him the ability to focus the nation's on that fight, at least for now. John Fritze, USA TODAY, "President Donald Trump's coronavirus test result could alter his reelection campaign, undercut pandemic messaging," 2 Oct. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'rob.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of rob

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a(1)

History and Etymology for rob

Middle English robben, from Anglo-French rober, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German roubōn to rob — more at reave

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Time Traveler for rob

Time Traveler

The first known use of rob was in the 13th century

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Statistics for rob

Last Updated

7 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Rob.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/rob. Accessed 20 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for rob

rob

verb
How to pronounce rob (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of rob

: to take money or property from (a person or a place) illegally and sometimes by using force, violence, or threats
: to keep (someone) from getting something expected or wanted

rob

verb
\ ˈräb How to pronounce rob (audio) \
robbed; robbing

Kids Definition of rob

1 : to unlawfully take something away from a person or place in secrecy or by force, threat, or trickery
2 : to keep from getting something due, expected, or desired The noisy party robbed her of sleep.

Other Words from rob

robber noun

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More from Merriam-Webster on rob

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for rob

Nglish: Translation of rob for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of rob for Arabic Speakers

Comments on rob

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