load

noun
\ ˈlōd How to pronounce load (audio) \

Definition of load

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : the quantity that can be carried at one time by a specified means especially : a measured quantity of a commodity fixed for each type of carrier often used in combination a boatload of tourists
b : whatever is put on a person or pack animal to be carried : pack donkeys with heavy loads
c : whatever is put in a ship or vehicle or airplane for conveyance : cargo The ship was carrying a load of automobiles. especially : a quantity of material assembled or packed as a shipping unit
2a : a mass or weight supported by something branches bent low by their load of fruit
b : the forces to which a structure is subjected due to superposed weight or to wind pressure on the vertical surfaces broadly : the forces to which a given object is subjected Losing weight will lessen the load on your knees.
3a : something that weighs down the mind or spirits took a load off her mind
b : a burdensome or laborious responsibility always carried his share of the load
4 slang : an intoxicating amount of liquor drunk
5 : a large quantity : lot usually used in plural The boy had loads of toys.
6a : a charge for a firearm
b : the quantity of material loaded into a device at one time
7 : external resistance overcome by a machine or prime mover
8a : power output (as of a power plant) or power consumption (as by a device)
b : a device to which power is delivered
9a(1) : the amount of work that a person carries or is expected to carry his heavy load of day-to-day workNew York Times
(2) : the amount of authorized work to be performed by a machine, a group, a department, or a factory The washer can take a 10-pound load.
b : the demand on the operating resources of a system (such as a telephone exchange or a refrigerating apparatus)
10 slang : eyeful used in the phrase get a load of Get a load of his new car.
11 : the amount of a deleterious microorganism, parasite, growth, or substance present in a human or animal body measure viral load in the blood the worm load in rats

called also burden

12 : an amount added (as to the price of a security or the net premium in insurance) to represent selling expense and profit to the distributor

load

verb
loaded; loading; loads

Definition of load (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to put a load in or on load a truck
b : to place in or on a means of conveyance load freight
2a : to encumber or oppress with something heavy, laborious, or disheartening : burden a company loaded down with debts
b : to place as a burden or obligation load more work on him
3a : to increase the weight of by adding something heavy
b : to add a conditioning substance (such as a mineral salt) to for body
c : to weight or shape (dice) to fall unfairly
d : to pack with one-sided or prejudicial influences : bias
e : to charge with multiple meanings (such as emotional associations or hidden implications)
f : to weight (something, such as a test) with factors influencing validity or outcome
4a : to supply in abundance or excess : heap, pack
b : to put runners on (first, second, and third bases) in baseball
5a : to put a load or charge in (a device or piece of equipment) load a gun
b : to place or insert especially as a load in a device or piece of equipment load film in a camera
c : to copy or transfer (something, such as a program or data) into the memory of a digital device (such as a computer) especially from an external source (such as a disk drive or the Internet) Load a new program or game onto your hard disk, and you must run an installation program that decompresses the information held on the floppy disks— Paul C. Schuytema
d : to put a supply of funds or resources into (an account, a gift card, etc.) She was told to go to the Dollar General Store and load a Google Play gift card with $100.The Times Reporter (New Philadelphia, Ohio)
6 : to alter (something, such as an alcoholic drink) by adding an adulterant or drug
7a : to add a load to (an insurance premium)
b : to add a sum to after profits and expenses are accounted for loaded prices

intransitive verb

1 : to receive a load
2 : to put a load on or in a carrier, device, or container especially : to insert the charge or cartridge in the chamber of a firearm
3 : to go or go in as a load tourists loading onto a bus
4 : to become loaded into a computer's memory the program loads quickly
load up on
1 : to ingest in usually large amounts senators loading up on fried chicken and champagne— H. L. Mencken
2 : to acquire in usually large amounts loaded up on hot stocks

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Other Words from load

Verb

loader noun

Examples of load in a Sentence

Noun

He lifted the load onto his shoulders. She was carrying a heavy load of legal documents in her briefcase. He picked up a load of firewood and carried it into the house. The truck was carrying a full load of sand. Losing weight will lessen the load on your knees. His death is a heavy load to bear.

Verb

load a truck with packages Workers were loading and unloading the ships as they came into port. We loaded up and drove off. load packages on a truck We loaded our luggage in the car and drove off. Workers were loading cargo on the ships. She loaded the table with all kinds of delicious foods. load a tape into the VCR The film didn't load properly. The bus stopped to load a few more passengers.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Caroline Bille Brahe took on a heavy load this summer. Brooke Bobb, Vogue, "Model Caroline Bille Brahe Is Taking Her Vintage Business to the Next Level With This New Brick-and-Mortar Space," 9 Oct. 2018 The Waste Management facility recently paid a paper mill to take a load of junk mail and other mixed paper off its hands, Taylor said. Scott Dance, baltimoresun.com, "Rise of 'wishcycling,' plummeting value of paper and glass raise concerns about 'a new reality of recycling'," 20 June 2018 While Haddish's retelling didn't exactly seem so friendly, perhaps knowing the biter's identity will take a load off the shoulders of the Beyhive. Abby Jones, Billboard, "Tiffany Haddish Reveals the Identity of Who Bit Beyonce," 13 June 2018 Think of it as giving your home a brain — so your dad can take a load off his. Brianna Steinhilber /, NBC News, "18 last-minute Father's Day gifts for every type of dad (and every budget)," 12 June 2018 The student must take a full course load of at least 12 semester hours of undergraduate credit with all academic courses impacting their grade point average. Houston Chronicle, "Cleveland’s Wood named to Mississippi College dean’s list," 7 June 2018 Modrell ranks in the top 5 percent of her graduating class while taking a rigorous course load. Kyle Neddenriep, Indianapolis Star, "2018 City and County Athletes of the Year," 30 May 2018 Romo is a reliever who starts games and gets out of the way, who pitches the first inning to take the load off the rest of the staff. John Shea, San Francisco Chronicle, "Giants eye Sergio Romo experiment, which brings memories of A’s Steve McCatty," 26 May 2018 The second product is a hydrating sleep mask that plumps and firms your skin overnight with loads of anti-aging ingredients. Maya Allen, Marie Claire, "This Is Halle Berry’s Anti-Aging Secret That Keeps Her Skin Looking Forever Young," 25 Jan. 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Stewards had to load it onto a flatbed and haul it back to the garage, cutting short his drive. Joseph Wilson, The Seattle Times, "Leclerc impresses for Ferrari on 2nd day of F1 preseason," 19 Feb. 2019 The article makes very clear that SimCity's NES version is incomplete, and as a result, its videos and explanations are arguably an easier way to explore the game than trying to load it yourself. Sam Machkovech, Ars Technica, "You can now download the long-lost (and unfinished) SimCity NES port," 26 Dec. 2018 Outside, hundreds of supporters called for justice as the teen's casket was loaded into the hearse. CBS News, "Slaying of Bronx teen highlights NYPD efforts to curb gang violence," 28 June 2018 The KitchenAid is loaded with convenient features, too. Betty Gold, Good Housekeeping, "7 Best Counter-Depth Refrigerators to Buy in 2019, Reviewed By Kitchen Appliance Experts," 27 Feb. 2019 The Instagram account @Pechuga_Vintage of vintage fashion dealer Johnny Valencia is loaded with covetable items. Liana Satenstein, Vogue, "Johnny Valencia Is Instagram’s “King of Corsets”," 20 Feb. 2019 The Marine Corps version, the MV-22 Osprey, can be loaded with 24 Marine combat troops in the back and fly at speeds of up to 240 knots (276 miles an hour). Kyle Mizokami, Popular Mechanics, "V-22 Osprey: The Story of the Revolutionary Tiltrotor Aircraft," 8 Feb. 2019 Oats are one of your most economical breakfast options, and as part of the whole-grain family, they're loaded with beneficial nutrients. Joy Bauer, Ms, Woman's Day, "Nutrition Expert Joy Bauer's Tips for Eating Healthy on a Budget," 23 Jan. 2019 It's loaded to the gills Things actually get a bit more distinct compared to the gasoline Kona on the inside. Jonathan M. Gitlin, Ars Technica, "The new 2019 Hyundai Kona EV is a clever little electric crossover," 24 Oct. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'load.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of load

Noun

12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for load

Noun and Verb

Middle English lod, from Old English lād support, carrying — more at lode

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Learn More about load

Dictionary Entries near load

lo

LOA

loach

load

load-bearing tile

load binder

load chart

Statistics for load

Last Updated

23 Mar 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for load

The first known use of load was in the 12th century

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More Definitions for load

load

noun

Financial Definition of load

What It Is

A load is a fee paid to purchase or sell a specific investment. It is expressed as a percentage of the amount invested. The term is most often used when discussing mutual funds.

How It Works

In general, there are two kinds of loads: front-end loads and back-end loads. A front-end load is a fee paid to purchase an investment, and a back-end load is a fee paid to sell an investment (it may also be called a contingent deferred sales charge, an exit fee, or a redemption charge). A no-load fund is one that does not charge any fees of this type.

Let's assume you are interested in making a $10,000 investment in the Company XYZ mutual fund. If the fund has a 4% front-end load, then of the $10,000 investment, $400 ($10,000 x .04) is paid to the fund company and $9,600 is actually invested in the fund as a result. Ideally, the earnings from the investment should more than make up for the front-end load. In this example, the front-end loaded fund must return 14.6% in one year to reach $11,000 in value after the fee.

If the fund instead has a 4% back-end load, then you must pay a $400 fee upon the sale of the investment ($10,000 x .04). Again, the earnings from the investment should ideally more than make up for the back-end load. In this example, the back-end loaded fund must therefore return 14% in one year to reach $11,000 in value after the fee.

Clearly, the size of the load affects the size of the investor's return. In our example, if the Company XYZ fund is a no-load fund, then in order to reach $11,000 in value after one year, it only needs to generate a 10% return.

Front-end loads vary widely and may apply to reinvestments of dividends, interest, or capital gain. This mutual funds are often referred to as A Shares. When looking at mutual fund trading information, front-end loaded mutual funds will have ask prices that are greater than the fund's net asset value (or bid price). The ask price equals the fund's net asset value plus the front-end load.

Back-end loads are commonly assessed on the beginning value of the investment, although some companies calculate the fee on the ending value if it is lower than the original purchase price. Back-end load mutual funds are often referred to as B Shares. Generally, back-end loads are reduced for each year the investor holds the investment. If the investor holds the investment long enough, many funds waive the back-end fee. For example, a back-end fee might be 5% in the first year, 4% in the second year, and so forth until the fee is zero.

Frequently, investors are able to pay reduced loads if they make large investments. The amount that qualifies for a reduced load is called the breakpoint and varies from investment to investment. Some funds may have more than one breakpoint. In some cases, an investor can sign a letter of intent with the investment company, promising to invest a certain amount over time in order to qualify for the reduced load now.

Why It Matters

Loads discourage investors from frequently trading their mutual fund shares, an activity that requires funds to have considerable amounts of cash on hand rather than invested. Generally, however, a load is considered payment for the broker's expertise in selecting the right fund for the investor. Notably, there is considerable controversy about whether load funds perform better or worse than no-load funds.

Loads are most often associated with mutual funds, but annuities, life insurance policies, and limited partnerships may also have loads. Mutual funds must disclose loads and other fees in their prospectuses, and it is important to understand that a load is only one of several types of fees that may be charged. Thus, when comparing investments, investors should be careful to evaluate all fees associated with an investment, not just the size of the load.

Source: Investing Answers

load

noun

English Language Learners Definition of load

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: something that is lifted and carried
: an amount that can be carried at one time : an amount that fills something (such as a truck)
somewhat technical : the weight that is carried or supported by something

load

verb

English Language Learners Definition of load (Entry 2 of 2)

: to put an amount of something in or on (something)
: to put (an amount of something) into or onto something
: to supply (someone or something) with a large amount of something

load

noun
\ ˈlōd How to pronounce load (audio) \

Kids Definition of load

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : something lifted up and carried : burden
2 : the quantity of material put into a device at one time He washed a load of clothes.
3 : a large number or amount They collected loads of candy on Halloween.
4 : a mass or weight supported by something
5 : something that causes worry or sadness That's a load off my mind.
6 : a charge for a firearm

load

verb
loaded; loading

Kids Definition of load (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to put a load in or on They loaded the truck.
2 : to supply abundantly Newspapers loaded her with praise.
3 : to put something into a device so it can be used You have to load film into the camera.

Other Words from load

loader noun

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load

noun
\ ˈlōd How to pronounce load (audio) \

Medical Definition of load

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a mass or weight put on something
b : the amount of stress put on something this normal instinctive fear which adds its load to the nervous system— H. G. Armstrong
c : an amount of something (as food or water) added to the body or available for use in some physiological process the cell's response to an increased metabolic loadEmergency Medicine
2 : the number or quantity (as of patients) to be accommodated or treated the patient load of physicians in private practiceJournal of the American Medical Association
3 : the amount of a deleterious microorganism, parasite, growth, or substance present in a human or animal body measure viral load in the blood the worm load in rats

called also burden

Medical Definition of load (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to put a load in or on rabbits were loaded with…pyruvate by intravenous injectionsExperiment Station Record
2 : to weight (as a test or experimental situation) with factors influencing validity or outcome
3 : to change by adding an adulterant or drug patent medicines were loaded with narcotics— D. W. Maurer & V. H. Vogel

load

noun

Legal Definition of load

: an amount added (as to the price of a security or the net premium in insurance) to represent selling expense and profit to the distributor — compare no-load

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More from Merriam-Webster on load

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with load

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for load

Spanish Central: Translation of load

Nglish: Translation of load for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of load for Arabic Speakers

Comments on load

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