fume

noun
\ ˈfyüm How to pronounce fume (audio) \

Definition of fume

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a smoke, vapor, or gas especially when irritating or offensive engine exhaust fumes
b : an often noxious suspension of particles in a gas (such as air)
2 : something (such as an emotion) that impairs one's reasoning sometimes his head gets a little hot with the fumes of patriotism— Matthew Arnold
3 : a state of excited irritation or anger usually used in the phrase in a fume
on fumes
: with little of the original strength or energy remaining tired ballplayers running on fumes

fume

verb
fumed; fuming

Definition of fume (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to expose to or treat with fumes
2 : to give off in fumes fuming thick black smoke
3 : to utter while in a state of excited irritation or anger

intransitive verb

1a : to emit fumes
b : to be in a state of excited irritation or anger fretted and fumed over the delay
2 : to rise in or as if in fumes

Other Words from fume

Noun

fumy \ ˈfyü-​mē How to pronounce fume (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms for fume

Synonyms: Verb

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Examples of fume in a Sentence

Verb She's still fuming about not being invited to the party. We sat there waiting for him, fuming with anger at the delay. “They made these changes without even asking our opinion,” one employee fumed. The volcano was fuming thick black smoke.
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Although scallop fume inhalation was proving nonreactive, surely sharing scallop protein particles via mouth-to-mouth contact would not be. Bonnie Garmus, Bon Appétit, 19 Apr. 2022 The legislation would create new mandates for crew training and for reporting and investigating fume events. Kiera Feldmanstaff Writer, Los Angeles Times, 31 Mar. 2022 Its surface was sending out a faint autumnal fume, like faraway burning leaves. Cynthia Ozick, The New Yorker, 7 Mar. 2022 One of those designs includes the Endeavour Centre Seconds Concept X seconde/seconde/, which is similar in design to the new perpetual calendar models featuring a brightly colored fume dial with a cartoonish rubber eraser at its center. Demetrius Simms, Robb Report, 15 Feb. 2022 Many in the vice president's circle fume that she's not being adequately prepared or positioned, and instead is being sidelined. Chris Cillizza, CNN, 2 Dec. 2021 Many in the vice president's circle fume that she's not being adequately prepared or positioned, and instead is being sidelined. Chris Cillizza, CNN, 2 Dec. 2021 Big rigs hogged streets and highways, waddling to and from the nearby fume-spewing port. Steve Lopez Columnist, Los Angeles Times, 13 Nov. 2021 Many in the vice president's circle fume that she's not being adequately prepared or positioned, and instead is being sidelined. Chris Cillizza, CNN, 2 Dec. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb But from that point forward, Straw Man Army — Owen Deutsch and Sean Fentress — refuses to fume, panic, scowl or proselytize. Washington Post, 26 Apr. 2022 All through the Beijing Games, the unchecked swagger of Canada’s women’s hockey team had been conspicuous for all to see — and to admire, fume over and fear. New York Times, 16 Feb. 2022 The back-door alley entrance of the SEC headquarters is where people go to smoke, and sometimes also maybe to fume. Joseph Goodman | Jgoodman@al.com, al, 10 Feb. 2022 Verstappen was left to fume while Hamilton built up a comfortable cushion, only for the safety car to bring the pack back together for the closing stages. Joshua Robinson, WSJ, 12 Dec. 2021 Both senators have yet to publicly do so, even as liberal Democrats continue to publicly fume over the reticence. BostonGlobe.com, 30 Sep. 2021 So while Team Logan goes in search of a country where the kingpin can fume and avoid extradition, and Team Kendall swings wildly between fist-bumping triumph and holy-moly terror, both sides are living in equal fear of the near future. San Diego Union-Tribune, 15 Oct. 2021 That means that musical-theater aficionados — for whom judging is a contact sport — will have plenty of opportunities to fume, rave, or shrug at the cinematic treatment of some favorite shows. BostonGlobe.com, 15 Sep. 2021 Others in the crowd began to fume as more reports of Taliban violence pinged on their phones. Washington Post, 31 Aug. 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'fume.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of fume

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for fume

Noun

Middle English, "smoke, exhalation," borrowed from Anglo-French fum, going back to Latin fūmus "smoke, fumes," going back to Indo-European *dhuh2-mó- "smoke, vapor" (whence also Old Church Slavic dymŭ "smoke," Lithuanian dū́mai, Sanskrit dhūmáḥ, and probably Greek thȳmós "spirit, mind, courage"), noun derivative from a verbal base *dhu̯eh2- or *dheu̯h2- "produce smoke by burning," whence Greek thýō, thýein "to sacrifice," Latin suffiō, suffīre "to subject to smoke, fumigate," Old Church Slavic dujǫ, duti "to blow" and perhaps Tocharian B twās- "kindle, ignite"

Note: Also allied are Hittite tuhhae-, perhaps "to smoke out, drive out by smoke," from an unattested noun derivative (earlier glossed as "gasp, cough"; see A. Kloeckhorst, Etymological Dictionary of the Hittite Inherited Lexicon, Brill, 2008); and Old High German toum "vapor, smoke," Middle Dutch doom "vapor, steam," going back to Germanic *dauma-, presumably from an o-grade derivative *dhou̯h2-mo-. Greek thȳmós is an exact phonetic correspondent to the other words, though the sense divergence suggests influence from some phonetically similar base of different meaning.

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The first known use of fume was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near fume

fumblingness

fume

fume chamber

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Last Updated

26 Apr 2022

Cite this Entry

“Fume.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fume. Accessed 20 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for fume

fume

noun
\ ˈfyüm How to pronounce fume (audio) \

Kids Definition of fume

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a disagreeable smoke, vapor, or gas usually used in pl. noxious fumes

fume

verb
fumed; fuming

Kids Definition of fume (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to give off a disagreeable smoke, vapor, or gas
2 : to be angry
3 : to say something in an angry way "Don't ever ask me again," I fumed.

More from Merriam-Webster on fume

Nglish: Translation of fume for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of fume for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about fume

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