foam

1 of 2

noun

1
: a light frothy mass of fine bubbles formed in or on the surface of a liquid or from a liquid: such as
a
: a frothy mass formed in salivating or sweating
b
: a stabilized froth produced chemically or mechanically and used especially in fighting oil fires
c
: a material in a lightweight cellular form resulting from introduction of gas bubbles during manufacture
2
: sea
3
: something resembling foam
foamless adjective

foam

2 of 2

verb

foamed; foaming; foams

intransitive verb

1
a
: to produce or form foam
b
: to froth at the mouth especially in anger
broadly : to be angry
2
: to gush out in foam
3
: to become covered with or as if with foam
streets … foaming with lifeThomas Wolfe

transitive verb

1
: to cause to foam
specifically : to cause air bubbles to form in
2
: to convert (something, such as a plastic) into a foam
foamable adjective
foamer noun

Example Sentences

Noun As I poured the beer, foam bubbled up in the glass. The fire extinguisher is filled with foam. a can of shaving foam Verb The soda foamed in the glass. The mixture will bubble and foam when you add the yeast.
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
The two-in-one gel and foam pillow provides comfort and support while keeping its shape over time. Laura Denby, Peoplemag, 18 Jan. 2023 Within each foam-like ootheca are dozens or hundreds mantis eggs that can survive the perils of winter because of their foamy insulation. oregonlive, 8 Jan. 2023 This home is foam encapsulated and has energy-efficient windows and appliances. Dallas News, 25 Dec. 2022 From foam-filled and down alternative picks to oh-so-fluffy hotel-style pillows, there's an option for every type of sleeper on this list. Sophie Dweck, Town & Country, 9 Nov. 2022 The foam-padded grip handles increase friction and minimize hand and muscle fatigue. Kathleen Willcox, Popular Mechanics, 4 Sep. 2022 Tempur Sealy this year plans to spend over $250 million on capital projects, including a new foam-pouring plant. Kristin Broughton, WSJ, 15 Aug. 2022 This party takes a DJ dance party to the next level with the addition of a giant foam making machine. Hartford Courant, 5 July 2022 Cheaper boards are usually made of plastic or even foam, but the best and sturdiest are made of wood. Chicago Tribune, 10 Jan. 2023
Verb
The mixture may foam up — just go slowly and carefully. Eunice Liu, Discover Magazine, 3 Mar. 2015 Some pollutants foam up in water, and those bubbles are ones that industry or water treatment centers might like to pop. Leslie Nemo, Discover Magazine, 7 Feb. 2020 The milk may foam, so keep an eye on it, pausing the microwave and stirring as needed. Washington Post, 7 Feb. 2022 Remove the pan from the heat and immediately add the baking soda, butter, and vanilla and stir to combine; the mixture will foam up. Jessica Battilana, San Francisco Chronicle, 30 Nov. 2021 Whisk in the sugar to combine, then switch to a silicone spatula and bring the mixture to a boil — the milk will foam and rise up. San Diego Union-Tribune, 9 June 2021 Whisk in the sugar to combine, then switch to a silicone spatula and bring the mixture to a boil — the milk will foam and rise up. San Diego Union-Tribune, 9 June 2021 Whisk in the sugar to combine, then switch to a silicone spatula and bring the mixture to a boil — the milk will foam and rise up. San Diego Union-Tribune, 9 June 2021 Whisk in the sugar to combine, then switch to a silicone spatula and bring the mixture to a boil — the milk will foam and rise up. San Diego Union-Tribune, 9 June 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'foam.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

Middle English fome, from Old English fām; akin to Old High German feim foam, Latin spuma foam, pumex pumice

First Known Use

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1a

Time Traveler
The first known use of foam was before the 12th century

Dictionary Entries Near foam

Cite this Entry

“Foam.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/foam. Accessed 6 Feb. 2023.

Kids Definition

foam

1 of 2 noun
1
: a light mass of fine bubbles formed in or on a liquid
2
: a mass of fine bubbles formed (as by a horse) in producing saliva or sweating
3
: a long-lasting mass of bubbles produced chemically and used especially in fighting oil fires
4
: a material (as rubber) in a lightweight cellular form resulting from the presence of gas bubbles during manufacture
foamily
ˈfō-mə-lē
adverb
foaminess
ˈfō-mē-nəs
noun
foamy
-mē
adjective

foam

2 of 2 verb
1
: to produce or form foam : froth
2
: to be angry

Medical Definition

foam

noun
: a light frothy mass of fine bubbles formed in or on the surface of a liquid
spermicidal foam
foam verb

More from Merriam-Webster on foam

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