foam

noun
\ˈfōm \

Definition of foam 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a light frothy mass of fine bubbles formed in or on the surface of a liquid or from a liquid: such as

a : a frothy mass formed in salivating or sweating

b : a stabilized froth produced chemically or mechanically and used especially in fighting oil fires

c : a material in a lightweight cellular form resulting from introduction of gas bubbles during manufacture

2 : sea

3 : something resembling foam

foam

verb
foamed; foaming; foams

Definition of foam (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1a : to produce or form foam

b : to froth at the mouth especially in anger broadly : to be angry

2 : to gush out in foam

3 : to become covered with or as if with foam streets … foaming with life— Thomas Wolfe

transitive verb

1 : to cause to foam specifically : to cause air bubbles to form in

2 : to convert (something, such as a plastic) into a foam

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Other Words from foam

Noun

foamless \ˈfōm-ləs \ adjective

Verb

foamable \ˈfō-mə-bəl \ adjective
foamer \ˈfō-mər \ noun

Synonyms for foam

Synonyms: Noun

froth, head, lather, spume, suds, surf

Synonyms: Verb

boil, burn, fume, rage, rankle, seethe, sizzle, steam, storm

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Examples of foam in a Sentence

Noun

As I poured the beer, foam bubbled up in the glass. The fire extinguisher is filled with foam. a can of shaving foam

Verb

The soda foamed in the glass. The mixture will bubble and foam when you add the yeast.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Nichols tried putting his steak foam out with his curbside recycling. Scott Dance, baltimoresun.com, "Rise of 'wishcycling,' plummeting value of paper and glass raise concerns about 'a new reality of recycling'," 20 June 2018 That's because they're equipped with the same type of propulsion used in fire extinguishers to expel foam. Marcia Dunn, The Christian Science Monitor, "InSight spacecraft has a deep mission in Martian soil," 2 May 2018 Shi and others recruited and hired current and former employees of the engineering firm in Houston, including Liu, to aid CBMF's capability to make syntactic foam. Jose R. Gonzalez, Houston Chronicle, "Houston man indicted for 'vast criminal conspiracy' to aid China-owned companies," 27 Apr. 2018 The foam, on the other hand, is great for sections or all-over color. Devon Abelman, Allure, "K-Pop Star Heize Shows Off Bleach-Free Alternative to Holographic Highlights," 26 June 2018 Add the meat and cook, skimming the foam from the surface, until tender, about 1 hour. Chris Ross, sandiegouniontribune.com, "Cuban shredded beef has origins in Spain," 25 June 2018 But foam isn’t great in all cases (like for people with tinnitus), and a $50 noise machine might not be worth much if there’s ungodly snoring happening right beside you. Chris Welch, The Verge, "Bose’s new $250 Sleepbuds play soothing sounds instead of music," 20 June 2018 Combine all ingredients in a large pot with two gallons of water and simmer on the stove for several hours, periodically skimming the excess foam off the top. Nick Marino, New York Times, "An Artist’s Pho, Inspired by His Childhood in Vietnam," 12 June 2018 Add butter and remaining garlic cloves to the skillet and let the butter foam and melt around the steak. Alison Roman, The Cut, "Forget Engagement Chicken. Meet Breakup Steak.," 6 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Graphic footage shot by rescuers and activists show victims of the attack -- including children -- dead and injured, some ghostly white and foaming at the mouth in makeshift clinics. Sheena Mckenzie, CNN, "Syria 'chemical attack': 500 people affected, says WHO," 11 Apr. 2018 Years improve him; the effervescence of youth foamed away, what is really good in him still remains. New York Times, "Letters to the Editor," 15 June 2018 This month, keep your agenda flexible, prioritizing those spontaneous desires of yours, like applying a foaming face-mask at midnight and taking weird selfies. Catherine Urban, Bon Appetit, "It’s Barbecue Season, So Your June Horoscope Comes with a BBQ Side for Every Sign," 1 June 2018 Then breathing becomes laboured and people start salivating and then foaming at the mouth. Ciara Nugent, Time, "'There Will Be Severe Pain.' What to Know About the New Novichok Nerve Agent Poisoning in the U.K.," 5 July 2018 Whatever is going to get their base rabid and foaming at the mouth works for them and their agenda. Monique Judge, The Root, "Sean Hannity Blamed Maxine Waters for the Capital Gazette Shooting," 28 June 2018 New York Police Department Chief of Detectives Dermot Shea said on Tuesday the recent victims experienced similar symptoms, including foaming at the mouth. Zolan Kanno-youngs, WSJ, "K2 Overdose Tally Grows to 56 in Brooklyn," 22 May 2018 In the evening, use a gentle, non-foaming cleanser that contains anti-inflammatory ingredients such as argan oil, green tea, feverfew and aloe. Dr. Leslie Baumann, miamiherald, "How to choose a skin cleanser," 18 June 2018 The beer foamed up in a sugary rage, bright chunks of Lucky Charms floating amid the cascading tan bubbles. Josh Noel, chicagotribune.com, "You can make your own pastry stout at Beer Temple. But should you? We test it out," 11 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'foam.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of foam

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for foam

Noun

Middle English fome, from Old English fām; akin to Old High German feim foam, Latin spuma foam, pumex pumice

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Phrases Related to foam

foam at the mouth

shaving foam

Statistics for foam

Last Updated

8 Oct 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for foam

The first known use of foam was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for foam

foam

noun

English Language Learners Definition of foam

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a mass of small bubbles that are formed in or on a liquid

: a substance that is like a thick liquid made of many small bubbles

: a soft material that is used to make many products

foam

verb

English Language Learners Definition of foam (Entry 2 of 2)

: to produce foam

foam

noun
\ˈfōm \

Kids Definition of foam

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a mass of tiny bubbles that forms in or on the surface of a liquid

foam

verb
foamed; foaming

Kids Definition of foam (Entry 2 of 2)

: to produce or form a mass of tiny bubbles Baking soda will foam when you add vinegar.

foam

noun
\ˈfōm \

Medical Definition of foam 

: a light frothy mass of fine bubbles formed in or on the surface of a liquid spermicidal foam

Other Words from foam

foam verb

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Comments on foam

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