broom

1 of 2

noun

1
: any of various leguminous shrubs (especially genera Cytisus and Genista) with long slender branches, small leaves, and usually showy yellow flowers
especially : scotch broom
2
: a bundle of firm stiff twigs or fibers bound together on a long handle especially for sweeping

broom

2 of 2

verb

broomed; brooming; brooms

transitive verb

1
: to sweep with or as if with a broom
2
: to finish (something, such as a concrete surface) by means of a broom

Examples of broom in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
Gardeners can also use a broom and sweep the pesky bug into a bucket filled with soapy water. Julia Gomez, USA TODAY, 3 Apr. 2024 Hikers can enjoy the coastal sage scrub vegetation, including blooming plants like Indian paintbrush, California broom and black sage. Maura Fox, San Diego Union-Tribune, 1 Apr. 2024 During their honeymoon phase, the Queens Court hosts enlisted the support of a professional before jumping the broom in June 1995. Taiia Smart Young, Essence, 14 Feb. 2024 Such an experience is not limited to tennis rackets but includes every tool humans create and master: brooms, rakes, spoons, fishing rods, needles, saws, pencils, paintbrushes, saxophones, computer mice, prosthetics, wheelchairs and far more. Chip Colwell, Smithsonian Magazine, 26 Feb. 2024 Parts of the broom disintegrate on impact, bits of it flying scattershot through the air and onto the audience. Seth Combs, San Diego Union-Tribune, 4 Feb. 2024 The other children in the house alleged to authorities that the 6-year-old child had been locked up in a dog cage, zip-tied and beaten with a broom on several occasions, per the statement. Samira Asma-Sadeque, Peoplemag, 9 Feb. 2024 In my case: in a sage green uniform with a lanyard and a broom, sweeping up the linoleum floors of a Philadelphia elementary school. TIME, 9 Feb. 2024 The master leaves the house, and the apprentice uses his spell book to automate his chores, bringing artificial life into brooms, dishwashing and mops. Lyle Maxson, Rolling Stone, 16 Jan. 2024
Verb
There seems to be enough athleticism for the Aztecs to broom away the cobwebs, though. Bryce Miller, San Diego Union-Tribune, 22 Aug. 2023 The Flightless Birds missed the playoffs, the front office got broomed, and a new bunch of decision-makers will take over, no doubt with their deals in synch with the coach’s contract. Kevin Paul Dupont, BostonGlobe.com, 22 Apr. 2023 Bread buying and getting the paper were the bulk of our lifestyle outside of coffee, smokes, soaps and brooming away pigeons on the patio. Julia O'Malley, Anchorage Daily News, 16 Feb. 2023 In fact, some of the best sunsets appear in the winter, when a damp wind can broom away the grosser air. Los Angeles Times, 18 Jan. 2022 And the desire to see everyone broomed makes emotional sense. Shawn Windsor, Detroit Free Press, 15 Dec. 2019 The curling horns were broomed from wear at the tips, weathered and chipped from successful battles of dominance, and his fur showed scars earned from a long life in a harsh place. Ernie Cowan, San Diego Union-Tribune, 17 Aug. 2019 Williams broomed through the first set in 29 minutes, crackling with her first serve and whistling crisp winners from the baseline. Jason Gay, WSJ, 11 July 2019 V-6 Deep-Sixed Nissan has broomed the V-6 engine as the step-up powertrain offering, replacing it with a turbocharged inline-four. Joe Lorio, Car and Driver, 29 Mar. 2018

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'broom.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

Middle English, from Old English brōm; akin to Old High German brāmo bramble

First Known Use

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1838, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of broom was before the 12th century

Dictionary Entries Near broom

Cite this Entry

“Broom.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/broom. Accessed 12 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

broom

noun
ˈbrüm,
ˈbru̇m
1
: a plant of the legume family that has long slender branches along which grow many drooping yellow flowers
2
: a brush that has a long handle and is used for sweeping

Medical Definition

broom

noun
: any of various leguminous shrubs (especially genera Cytisus and Genista) with long slender branches, upright growth, small leaves, and usually showy yellow flowers
especially : scotch broom see broom top

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