doom

noun
\ ˈdüm How to pronounce doom (audio) \

Definition of doom

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a law or ordinance especially in Anglo-Saxon England
2a : judgment, decision especially : a judicial condemnation or sentence
3a : destiny especially : unhappy destiny
b : death, ruin

doom

verb
doomed; dooming; dooms

Definition of doom (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to give judgment against : condemn
2a : to fix the fate of : destine felt he was doomed to a life of loneliness
b : to make certain the failure or destruction of the scandal doomed her chances for election

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Choose the Right Synonym for doom

Noun

fate, destiny, lot, portion, doom mean a predetermined state or end. fate implies an inevitable and usually an adverse outcome. the fate of the submarine is unknown destiny implies something foreordained and often suggests a great or noble course or end. the country's destiny to be a model of liberty to the world lot and portion imply a distribution by fate or destiny, lot suggesting blind chance it was her lot to die childless , portion implying the apportioning of good and evil. remorse was his daily portion doom distinctly implies a grim or calamitous fate. if the rebellion fails, his doom is certain

Examples of doom in a Sentence

Noun The papers are filled with stories of gloom and doom. the story of a mysterious creature who lures travelers to their doom Verb A criminal record will doom your chances of becoming a politician. had always felt that he was doomed to remain single forever
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun But there was drama and comradeship and humor — Charlie and CJ going at it was so funny and sweet in the middle of this pending doom with China and the confrontation in the South China Sea. Dalton Ross, EW.com, "Martin Sheen 'wept with joy' at The West Wing reunion," 2 Dec. 2020 But that doesn’t mean 2020 will spell Black Friday’s doom. Marc Bain, Quartz, "Will 2020 mark the end of Black Friday?," 23 Nov. 2020 For a while all anyone could talk about, in tones of portent and doom, was what the baby might be missing. Patricia Lockwood, The New Yorker, "The Winged Thing," 23 Nov. 2020 Of all the trains to doom, Mr. Gronowski’s became especially etched in Holocaust history. New York Times, "A Holocaust Survivor Lifts Neighbors in Dark Times," 20 Nov. 2020 Viewers have seen Sam and Dean come out of more precarious fights unscathed, but knowing this was the final episode, there was an air of looming doom at every familiar-seeming moment. Sandra Gonzalez, CNN, "'Supernatural' comes to an emotional end on the CW," 20 Nov. 2020 Barrett's confirmation hearings featured a sort of role reversal, with Democrats predicting the law's doom with Barrett on the court and Republicans playing down the prospects for a ruling that would completely upend the law. Mark Sherman And Ricardo Alonso-zaldivar, Star Tribune, "Without Ginsburg, high court support for health law in doubt," 7 Nov. 2020 Today’s news that Joe Biden and Kamala Harris have passed the Electoral College threshold of 270 is just the kind of low-hanging fruit that semi-professional naysayers and hopelessly addicted doom-scrollers like to seize upon. Corey Seymour, Vogue, "Forget About Trump’s Lawsuits—Take the Win and Let Yourself Exhale," 7 Nov. 2020 Many San Franciscans will spend Tuesday doom-scrolling their social media accounts, watching the TV news through their fingers like a horror movie, and drowning their anxiety in booze, weed and Halloween candy. Heather Knight, SFChronicle.com, "San Francisco voters, distressed and determined, might break turnout record set in 1944," 3 Nov. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb In López Obrador’s case, refusing to concede didn’t doom his political career. Christian Paz, The Atlantic, "The World Leader Backing Trump’s State of Denial," 18 Nov. 2020 Yet Harris’s health-care agenda would doom the U.S. to the same fate of lackluster innovation. Brad Polumbo, National Review, "Kamala Harris’s Economic Philosophy Is No Laughing Matter," 2 Nov. 2020 Long a deep if somewhat paling red, Texas might be in play this year, and a defeat in the Lone Star State would doom Trump’s reelection bid. Scott Wilson, Washington Post, "With caravans and outdoor rallies that some see as intimidation, Trump supporters step up public promotion," 2 Nov. 2020 Biden doesn't need Texas to win the presidential race, but losing the second-largest electoral state in the country would certainly doom Trump. TheWeek, "Texas has exceeded its entire 2016 vote, and Ted Cruz is convinced it's a 'real race'," 30 Oct. 2020 Throughout Judge Barrett’s hearing, Democrats argued that her confirmation would doom the Affordable Care Act, along with its protections for pre-existing conditions, if she was seated in time to hear a case about the ACA shortly after the election. Lindsay Wise, WSJ, "Democrats to Boycott Committee Vote on Amy Coney Barrett," 22 Oct. 2020 Recall that in 2016, stock futures tanked on election night during the shock of Trump's victory, an outcome that many market gurus predicted would doom stocks. Matt Egan, CNN, "Wall Street could call the 2020 election before the media does," 21 Oct. 2020 On Friday, The Atlantic’s George Packer speculated that the unrest in Kenosha could doom Biden in November. Osita Nwanevu, The New Republic, "A Sister Souljah Moment to Rule Them All," 1 Sep. 2020 One after the other, new apartment buildings rose to house more occupants, which surely would doom the neighborhood anew. Star Tribune, "Lileks: Uptown Minneapolis is Schrodinger's neighborhood," 6 Nov. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'doom.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of doom

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for doom

Noun

Middle English, from Old English dōm; akin to Old High German tuom condition, state, Old English dōn to do

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Time Traveler for doom

Time Traveler

The first known use of doom was before the 12th century

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Statistics for doom

Last Updated

5 Dec 2020

Cite this Entry

“Doom.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/doom. Accessed 5 Dec. 2020.

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More Definitions for doom

doom

noun
How to pronounce doom (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of doom

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: very bad events or situations that cannot be avoided
: death or ruin

doom

verb

English Language Learners Definition of doom (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make (someone or something) certain to fail, suffer, die, etc.

doom

noun
\ ˈdüm How to pronounce doom (audio) \

Kids Definition of doom

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a terrible or unhappy ending or happening The news is full of doom and gloom.
2 : death sense 1 He met his doom.

doom

verb
doomed; dooming

Kids Definition of doom (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make sure that something bad will happen The plan was doomed to failure.

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Comments on doom

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