fore

1 of 6

noun

: something that occupies a front position

fore

2 of 6

adverb

1
: in, toward, or near the front : forward
The plane's exits are located fore and aft.
2
obsolete : at an earlier time or period

fore

3 of 6

adjective

1
: situated in front of something else : forward
2
: prior in order of occurrence : former

fore

4 of 6

preposition

variants or less commonly 'fore
1
: in the presence of
2
chiefly dialectal : before

fore

5 of 6

interjection

used by a golfer to warn anyone within range of the probable line of flight of the ball

fore-

6 of 6

combining form

1
a
: earlier : beforehand
foresee
b
: occurring earlier : occurring beforehand
foreshock
2
a
: situated at the front : in front
foreleg
b
: front part of (something specified)
forearm
c
: foremast
foretop
Phrases
to the fore
: in or into a position of prominence : forward

Examples of fore in a Sentence

Adverb The plane's exits are located fore and aft. Adjective the fore and aft cabins cats have five fore toes but only four hind toes Preposition set out early with the hope of arriving fore the sunset fore the stranger there swarmed a gaggle of curious street urchins
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
Where traditional databases are argued to have limited computational ability for temporal and unstructured data (spoiler alert: that’s what makes up most datasets), discussion around vector databases has come to the fore in recent months. Adrian Bridgwater, Forbes, 16 Feb. 2024 Those microprocessors and software have improved, and in recent years the Industrial Internet of Things has come to the fore. Vimal Kapur, Fortune, 30 Jan. 2024 Still, the revelation is the latest disclosure to bring to the fore a legal gray zone: Intelligence and law enforcement agencies sometimes purchase potentially sensitive and revealing domestic data from brokers that would require a court order to acquire directly. Charlie Savage, New York Times, 25 Jan. 2024 As missiles fly over the Middle East and navies converge in the Red Sea, the question of what the United States must do to remain the dominant sea power has come to the fore. Luther Ray Abel, National Review, 25 Jan. 2024 As MacDowell’s hedonistic sister, Laura San Giacomo is terrific, bringing to the fore the insecurities and strengths that shape her torrid desires and equally chilling frustrations. Duane Byrge, The Hollywood Reporter, 18 Jan. 2024 Though this reunion summons Adam’s inner child to the fore — a transformation Scott sells with heartbreaking subtlety, even when dressed in Christmas pajamas — there are still tricky adult conversations to be had with his parents about his sexuality and lonely middle age. Kyle Buchanan, New York Times, 17 Jan. 2024 Concerns regarding streamers first raised by European producers and regulators are now being echoed and brought to the fore around a large swathe of the world. Nick Vivarelli, Variety, 17 Jan. 2024 Dailey has a way of bringing a subject’s essence to the fore. Nichelle Dailey, Los Angeles Times, 16 Jan. 2024
Adjective
Our giant cyborg beetle mainly relies on neuromuscular stimulation of direct flight muscles for flight control and leg muscles of the fore legs for walking control. IEEE Spectrum, 28 Nov. 2017 For years most climbers, led by guides, stopped at a fore summit. John Branch, New York Times, 28 Sep. 2022 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'fore.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Adverb and Preposition

Middle English, from Old English; akin to Old English for

Adjective and Noun

fore-

Interjection

probably short for before

Combining form

Middle English for-, fore-, from Old English fore-, from fore, adverb

First Known Use

Noun

1637, in the meaning defined above

Adverb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Adjective

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Preposition

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Interjection

circa 1878, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of fore was before the 12th century

Dictionary Entries Near fore

Cite this Entry

“Fore.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fore. Accessed 25 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

fore

1 of 5 adverb
ˈfō(ə)r How to pronounce fore (audio)
ˈfȯ(ə)r
: in, toward, or near the front : forward

fore

2 of 5 adjective
: being or coming before in time, order, or space

fore

3 of 5 noun
: a front place or position
came to the fore

fore

4 of 5 interjection
used by a golfer to warn anyone within range of a hit ball

fore-

5 of 5 combining form
1
a
: earlier : beforehand
foresee
b
: occurring earlier : occurring beforehand
forethought
2
a
: situated at the front : in front
foreleg
b
: front part of (something specified)
forearm
Etymology

Combining form

Old English fore- "earlier, beforehand"

Medical Definition

fore

adjective
: situated in front of something else

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