flower

noun
flow·er | \ ˈflau̇(-ə)r \

Definition of flower 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1a : the specialized part of an angiospermous plant that occurs singly or in clusters, possesses whorls of often colorful petals or sepals, and bears the reproductive structures (such as stamens or pistils) involved in the development of seeds and fruit : blossom

b : a cluster of small flowers growing closely together that resembles and is often viewed as a single flower : inflorescence a hydrangea flower

c : a plant grown or valued for its flowers planted flowers in the front yard

d : a cut stem of a plant with its flower a bouquet of flowers

e : bloom entry 2 sense 1b lilacs in full flower

2a : the best part or example the flower of our youth

b : the finest most vigorous period wasted the flower of their lives

c : a state of blooming or flourishing in full flower

3 flowers plural : a finely divided powder produced especially by condensation or sublimation flowers of sulfur

flower

verb
flowered; flowering; flowers

Definition of flower (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1a : develop flowered into young womanhood

b : flourish sense 2

2 : to produce flowers : blossom

transitive verb

1 : to cause to bear flowers

2 : to decorate with flowers or floral designs

Illustration of flower

Illustration of flower

Noun

cross section of flower 1b: 1 filament, 2 anther, 3 stigma, 4 style, 5 petal, 6 ovary, 7 sepal, 8 pedicel, 9 stamen, 10 pistil, 11 perianth

In the meaning defined above

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Other words from flower

Noun

flowered \ˈflau̇(-ə)rd \ adjective
flowerful \ˈflau̇(-ə)r-fəl \ adjective
flowerless \ˈflau̇(-ə)r-ləs \ adjective
flowerlike \ˈflau̇(-ə)r-ˌlīk \ adjective

Verb

flowerer \ˈflau̇(-ə)r-ər \ noun

Examples of flower in a Sentence

Noun

We planted flowers in the garden. He sent her a bouquet of flowers. He wore a single flower in his lapel.

Verb

This tree flowers in early spring. The plant will flower every other year. His genius flowered at the university. a political movement that began to flower during the 1960s
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Most of the new landscaping is in, including trees, bushes and flowers. Steve Lord, Aurora Beacon-News, "With Water Street Mall work finished, Aurora looks to renovate Mundy Park," 12 July 2018 But the town’s police chief, who likens them to flowers, says his female subordinates have soothed motorists. The Economist, "Why a mayor in Lebanon has dressed policewomen in hot pants," 12 July 2018 With a little help from 57,000 flowers, love is in the air this summer as the gardens at Bellagio bring the romance of Italy to Las Vegas. Jay Jones, latimes.com, "Here's what 57,000 flowers create at Vegas' Bellagio Conservatory, where love is in the air," 12 July 2018 The ceremony was officiated by Lauren’s father Dwain Swanson, and the romantic theme incorporated flowers, wood and iron. Emily Strohm, PEOPLE.com, "Josiah Duggar Reveals the Advice His Parents Gave Him Before Wedding to Lauren Swanson," 11 July 2018 The photo itself is a Beyoncé-style pregnancy shoot, with the heavily-pregnant singer surrounded by flowers. Kathryn Lindsay, refinery29.com, "All About The Kulture: The Story Behind Cardi B's Daughter's Name," 11 July 2018 The root end of a green onion was carved into a flower, blooming from below. Lindsey Mcclave, The Courier-Journal, "Ngon Appetit keeps it simple with 3 items — soup, sandwiches, crepes," 11 July 2018 Participants will see more than a hundred species of native plants, many of them in peak flower or plume, in successful, persistent flowering meadows, in a wide variety of settings, both large and small. Courant Community, "Community News For The Stafford Edition," 10 July 2018 At the family's home, flowers were left on the lawn as further proof of how much the community cares. CBS News, "New details emerge after N.J. mom survives crash that killed husband, 4 daughters," 9 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

This is especially important with the southern high bush variety that flowers heavily when the plants are young. Stan Davidson, Sun-Sentinel.com, "With patience, blueberries can be grown in containers," 10 July 2018 In the 1850s, Thoreau charted when Walden Pond’s highbush blueberry first flowered. Washington Post, "Looking for signs of global warming? It’s all around you," 19 June 2018 Chickweed is up and in some instances already flowering. Jeff Lowenfels, Anchorage Daily News, "Your garden chore this week? Do the neighborly thing and tidy up," 7 June 2018 Mbappé, who has the skill set to flower into a Messi- or Cristiano Ronaldo-level star, is quick on his feet and has three goals in the tournament so far. Katherine Fominykh, baltimoresun.com, "World Cup final weekend: how to watch the matchups, plus time and odds," 14 July 2018 This political strain emerged before Meacham fully begins his story, flowering in the Confederate States of America, the modern world’s first experiment in building a nation founded explicitly on racial supremacy. Sean Wilentz, New York Times, "A Battle for the ‘Soul of America’? It’s as Old as America, One Historian Notes," 21 May 2018 But the conversation seems to focus on whether the Phillies can add a big bat, and whether the Flyers can wait for their talented youth to flower before their veterans wither, and whether the Sixers can sign LeBron. Marcus Hayes, Philly.com, "Philly sports fans should enjoy the ride | Marcus Hayes," 13 May 2018 Students unsure about walkout Ava and Aubrey Propstra, who attend school in the Paradise Valley Unified School District, went to the Desert Botanical Garden with their grandparents Friday to see the butterflies and flowering cacti. Elizabeth Montgomery, azcentral, "Parents, day cares gear up as teachers announce walkout will continue through Monday," 27 Apr. 2018 For a tall, pink-flowering crape myrtle consider Tuscarora. Calvin Finch, San Antonio Express-News, "There’s a lot to love about crape myrtles," 6 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'flower.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of flower

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for flower

Noun

Middle English flour flower, best of anything, flour, from Anglo-French flur, flour, flaur, from Latin flor-, flos — more at blow

Verb

see flower entry 1

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Statistics for flower

Last Updated

18 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for flower

The first known use of flower was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for flower

flower

noun

English Language Learners Definition of flower

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the part of a plant that is often brightly colored, that usually lasts a short time, and from which the seed or fruit develops

: a small plant that is grown for its beautiful flowers

: a cut stem of a plant with its flower

flower

verb

English Language Learners Definition of flower (Entry 2 of 2)

: to produce flowers

: to develop or grow in a successful way

flower

noun
flow·er | \ ˈflau̇-ər \

Kids Definition of flower

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a plant part that produces seed

2 : a small plant grown chiefly for its showy flowers

3 : the state of bearing flowers in full flower

4 : the best part or example in the flower of youth

Other words from flower

flowered \-ərd \ adjective
flowerless \-ər-ləs \ adjective

flower

verb
flowered; flowering

Kids Definition of flower (Entry 2 of 2)

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Comments on flower

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