flour

1 of 2

noun

1
: a product consisting of finely milled wheat
also : a similar product made from another grain or food product (such as dried potatoes or fish)
2
: a fine soft powder
flourless adjective
floury adjective

flour

2 of 2

verb

floured; flouring; flours

transitive verb

: to coat with or as if with flour

intransitive verb

: to break up into particles

Examples of flour in a Sentence

Noun a five-pound bag of flour mix the two flours together Verb The fish should be lightly floured before it's fried.
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
Advertisement The war in Ukraine also affected the cost of U.S. flour. Stephanie Breijo, Los Angeles Times, 15 May 2024 Here, acorn squash is served in a delicate tempura batter of rice flour, carbonated water and baking soda. Keith Pandolfi, The Enquirer, 14 May 2024 See all Example Sentences for flour 

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'flour.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

Middle English flour, flur "blossom of a plant, prime of life, best of a class, ground wheat free of bran," borrowed from Anglo-French flour, flur "blossom of a plant, paragon, best part, ground grain free of bran" — more at flower entry 1

Note: In the sense "ground grain free of bran and impurities," Anglo-French flour, flur was presumably originally short for flur de farine, "best part of the milled grain," which is reflected in contemporaneous Medieval Latin flos farinae. The Französisches etymologisches Wörterbuch points out that flur became the ordinary word for "flour" not only in Anglo-French, but also in at least part of medieval Picardy and in isolated areas elsewhere (vol. 3, p. 632). See also W. Rothwell, "From Latin to Anglo-French and Middle English: The Role of the Multilingual Gloss," Modern Language Review, vol. 88, no. 3 (July, 1993), pp. 584-85. In English, consistent distinction in spelling of the two meanings "blossom of a plant" and "finely milled grain" was not made before the eighteenth century. Samuel Johnson's dictionary (1755) still enters both meanings under the single spellling flower.

Verb

derivative of flour entry 1

First Known Use

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

circa 1657, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

Time Traveler
The first known use of flour was in the 13th century

Dictionary Entries Near flour

Cite this Entry

“Flour.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/flour. Accessed 27 May. 2024.

Kids Definition

flour

1 of 2 noun
1
: finely ground powdery meal of wheat or of any cereal grain or edible seed
2
: a fine soft powder

flour

2 of 2 verb
: to coat with flour
Etymology

Noun

Middle English flour "finely ground wheat meal," from earlier flour "best part, flower," from early French flor, flour "flower," from Latin flor-, flow "flower, blossom" — related to florid, flourish, flower

More from Merriam-Webster on flour

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