florid

adjective

flor·​id ˈflȯr-əd How to pronounce florid (audio)
ˈflär-
1
a
: very flowery in style : ornate
florid prose
florid declamations
also : having a florid style
a florid writer
b
: elaborately decorated
a florid interior
c
obsolete : covered with flowers
2
a
: tinged with red : ruddy
a florid complexion
b
: marked by emotional or sexual fervor
a florid secret life
a florid sensibility
3
: fully developed : manifesting a complete and typical clinical syndrome
the florid stage of a disease
4
archaic : healthy
floridity noun
floridly adverb
floridness noun

Did you know?

When it first entered English "florid" was used with the literal meaning "covered with flowers." That use, though now obsolete, hints at the word's history. English speakers borrowed "florid" from the Latin adjective floridus ("blooming" or "flowery"), itself from the verb "florēre" ("to bloom"). "Florēre," which in turn comes from a Latin root meaning "flower," is also an ancestor of the words "flourish" and "florescence" ("a state or period of flourishing"). These days, "florid" can refer to an overblown style in speech, writing, or decoration. As such, its synonyms include "ornate," "rococo," and "overwrought."

Examples of florid in a Sentence

a florid, gilded mirror that took up most of the wall gave a florid speech in honor of the queen's visit
Recent Examples on the Web If the closet is old enough, its ties will show a whole social history of the pallid fifties turning into the ambivalent sixties turning into the florid seventies. Adam Gopnik, The New Yorker, 6 July 2024 With their askew takes on the American mythos, twisted characters, inventive scores, vivid imagery, and florid violence, the Spaghetti Western developed into a rich subgenre that could easily fill a top 50 list of its own, one that rewards those who venture away from Leone. Keith Phipps, Vulture, 13 Mar. 2024 Readers were taken aback by myriad aspects of Christie’s florid essay, which runs nearly 4,000 words. Raul A. Reyes, NBC News, 1 Apr. 2024 The florid accusations against Ukraine and the West — combined with authorities’ public flaunting of ferocious retaliation such as cutting off part of one suspect’s ear — are probably calculated to divert attention from intelligence lapses that led to the attack, longtime Russia watchers said. Laura King, Los Angeles Times, 27 Mar. 2024 See all Example Sentences for florid 

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'florid.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

borrowed from Latin flōridus "abounding in flowers, brightly colored, in the bloom of youth, highly colored (of rhetoric)," adjective derivative, with the suffix -idus, corresponding to flōrēre "to bloom" — more at florescence

First Known Use

1651, in the meaning defined at sense 1c

Time Traveler
The first known use of florid was in 1651

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Dictionary Entries Near florid

Cite this Entry

“Florid.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/florid. Accessed 21 Jul. 2024.

Kids Definition

florid

adjective
flor·​id ˈflȯr-əd How to pronounce florid (audio)
ˈflär-
1
: flowery sense 2, ornate
florid writing
2
: tinged with red : ruddy
a florid complexion
floridly adverb
Etymology

from Latin floridus "blooming, flowery," from florēre "to blossom, flourish," from flor-, flos "a flower, blossom" — related to flour, flourish, flower

Medical Definition

florid

adjective
: fully developed : manifesting a complete and typical clinical syndrome
florid hyperplasia
floridly adverb

More from Merriam-Webster on florid

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