feel

1 of 2

verb

felt ˈfelt How to pronounce feel (audio) ; feeling

transitive verb

1
a
: to handle or touch in order to examine, test, or explore some quality
She felt the fabric to see if it was wool.
b
: to perceive by a physical sensation coming from discrete end organs (as of the skin or muscles)
He felt a sudden pain in his leg.
2
a
: to undergo passive experience of
continually felt the resentment of his competitors
b
: to have one's sensibilities markedly affected by
felt the insult deeply
3
: to ascertain by cautious trial
usually used with out
feeling out the sentiments of their neighbors on the subject of school improvements
4
a
: to be aware of by instinct or inference
feel trouble brewing
b
: believe, think
say what you really feel
5
US slang : to understand (someone) : to know how (someone) feels
Yeah, I feel you on that. I fall asleep every time I'm in the car as well.Scott Sugarman
When you buckle your chinstrap up, it's with a purpose, dog! Do you feel me?Eric Berry

intransitive verb

1
a
: to receive or be able to receive a tactile sensation
lost the ability to feel in his fingertips
b
: to search for something by using the sense of touch
She felt in her purse for her keys.
2
a
: to be conscious of an inward impression, state of mind, or physical condition
I feel sick.
b
: to have a marked sentiment or opinion
feels strongly about it
3
: seem
it feels like spring today
4
: to have sympathy or pity
I feel for you

feel

2 of 2

noun

1
2
: the sense of touch
3
a
: the quality of a thing as imparted through or as if through touch
b
: typical or peculiar quality or atmosphere
also : an awareness of such a quality or atmosphere
4
: intuitive knowledge or ability
Phrases
feel like
: to have an inclination for
feel like a walk?

Example Sentences

Verb He felt a sudden pain in his leg. I could feel the warmth of the sun. I felt someone tap my shoulder. Do you feel a draft? She felt the fabric to see if it was wool. Your ribs are bruised, but I don't feel any broken bones. Noun the feel of old leather Although the table is brand-new, it has the look and feel of an antique. He liked the feel of the sun on his face. See More
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
However, new hires or periods of growth can cause some existing employees to feel unsettled. Karla Reffold, Forbes, 25 Jan. 2023 My working theory is that viewers have been starved for the collectivity and community of the festival, and are eager to once again feel like a participant in an experience rather than a solo culture fan. Natalia Winkelman, BostonGlobe.com, 25 Jan. 2023 With so many brands entering the space, golfers have an endless selection of fun and exciting shirts to feel confident and showcase personality. Michael Loré, Robb Report, 24 Jan. 2023 As parents navigate this complicated landscape, mothers seem to feel most subjected to scrutiny by others. Caitlin Gibson, Washington Post, 24 Jan. 2023 After the game, the 26-year-old said an injury to his right elbow in Week 9 did not play a part in the loss, and had recently begun to feel better. Jason Hahn, Peoplemag, 24 Jan. 2023 And no community should be made to feel ashamed for demanding the government attention and resources necessary to prevent future harm. Erika D. Smithcolumnist, Los Angeles Times, 24 Jan. 2023 That might begin to feel like a fairytale, a beautiful but unreachable goal for places in which car ownership is literally etched into the landscape through roads and parking lots. WIRED, 24 Jan. 2023 Tim Giuliani, president of the Orlando Economic Partnership, said it’s important for employers and employees to feel safe, and concerns associated with shootings and crime could harm efforts to lure companies here. Ryan Gillespie, Orlando Sentinel, 23 Jan. 2023
Noun
The successor to the TT460, which won the Design Innovation Award in 2020, the compact TT420 has the feel of a much larger boat. Rachel Cormack, Robb Report, 23 Jan. 2023 Aside from a handful of premium events like Grand Slams and some of the Masters 1000 competitions, many tennis tournaments still have the feel of mid-tier minor league baseball. Lauren Hirsch, New York Times, 21 Jan. 2023 That's why prioritizing the feel of writing on your new tablet is so important. Zoë Hannah, Popular Mechanics, 20 Jan. 2023 San Francisco knocked Dallas out of the playoffs last season in the first round so, in a sense, this has the feel of a rematch. Staff Writer Follow, Los Angeles Times, 20 Jan. 2023 Bally Casino strives to bring the feel of Atlantic City to the user experience with offerings such as online casino, live dealer games, online slots, online bingo and even free daily games. Chris Ilenstine, Chicago Tribune, 17 Jan. 2023 Sharon Van Etten, Maggie Rogers) to capture the sound and feel of the album. Jon Freeman, Rolling Stone, 17 Jan. 2023 Depending on how one chose to look at it, the torrential downpours across the city of Los Angeles either threatened the vibe or enhanced the London-like feel of the festivities. Chris Gardner, The Hollywood Reporter, 15 Jan. 2023 Preserve the fluffy feel of your bath towels with a folding method that helps prevent extra wear. Jessica Bennett, Better Homes & Gardens, 13 Jan. 2023 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'feel.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Verb and Noun

Middle English felen, from Old English fēlan; akin to Old High German fuolen to feel, Latin palpare to caress

First Known Use

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of feel was before the 12th century

Dictionary Entries Near feel

Cite this Entry

“Feel.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/feel. Accessed 5 Feb. 2023.

Kids Definition

feel

1 of 2 verb
felt ˈfelt How to pronounce feel (audio) ; feeling
1
a
: to sense through direct contact
especially : touch entry 1 sense 1
b
: to examine or test by touching : handle
2
b
: to suffer from
3
: to discover by trying carefully
often used with out
4
a
: to be aware of
feel trouble brewing
b
: to be conscious of a physical or mental state
feel happy
feel sick
5
: to search for something with the fingers
6
: to seem especially to the touch
feels rough
7
: to have sympathy or pity
I feel for you

feel

2 of 2 noun
1
: the sense of touch
2
3
: the quality of a thing as indicated through touch
4
: intuitive knowledge or ability
a feel for languages

Medical Definition

feel

1 of 2 verb
felt ˈfelt How to pronounce feel (audio) ; feeling

transitive verb

1
: to handle or touch in order to examine, test, or explore some quality
felt the compress to see if it was wet
2
: to perceive by a physical sensation coming from discrete end organs (as of the skin or muscles)

intransitive verb

1
: to receive or be able to receive a tactile sensation
2
: to search for something by using the sense of touch

feel

2 of 2 noun
1
: the perception of physical sensations
especially : the sense of touch
2

More from Merriam-Webster on feel

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