fee

noun
\ ˈfē How to pronounce fee (audio) \

Definition of fee

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a(1) : an estate in land held in feudal law from a lord on condition of homage and service
(2) : a piece of land so held
b : an inherited or heritable estate in land
2a : a fixed charge
b : a sum paid or charged for a service
in fee
: in absolute and legal possession

fee

verb
feed; feeing

Definition of fee (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 chiefly Scotland : hire

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Synonyms & Antonyms for fee

Synonyms: Noun

ante, charge, cost, damage, figure, freight, price, price tag

Synonyms: Verb

assume, employ, engage, hire, lay on [chiefly British], pay, place, recruit, retain, sign (up or on), take on

Antonyms: Verb

ax (or axe), can, discharge, dismiss, fire, sack

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Examples of fee in a Sentence

Noun

The admission fee is $10. a credit card with no annual fee The tuition fees went up this year. We returned the library book late and had to pay a late fee. His insurance covers the doctor's fee. They paid a fortune in legal fees.

Verb

the townspeople fee country lasses as housemaids, nurses, and cooks
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Verizon will also change an extra $10 a month for 5G Ultra Wideband access, but that fee is waived for now. Michael Simon, PCWorld, "Verizon announces Galaxy S10 5G preorders and 20-city 5G expansion, but it’ll cost you," 25 Apr. 2019 Overseen by the Washington Supreme Court, the bar association is a self-regulating agency of legal professionals that derives its funding through mandatory fees of $453 per year paid by each of its roughly 40,000 members. Lewis Kamb, The Seattle Times, "Amid turmoil, judge rules Washington State Bar Association must disclose correspondence that explains director’s firing," 14 Apr. 2019 Locals can arrange a ride with Carmen to a neighboring town to, say, pick up a prescription in exchange for a small fee or gas money. Melody Warnick, Woman's Day, "These Small-Town Heroes Are Helping Their Communities Thrive," 2 Apr. 2019 With 2019 just weeks away, the new year looks to be full of its own surprises, bringing new elements like biometrics and more (!) bag fees to the travel experience. Kristen Leigh Painter, Condé Nast Traveler, "How Air Travel Will Change in 2019," 13 Dec. 2018 Even after those fees, these five hosts are certainly cashing in. Jennifer Aldrich, Country Living, "Judge Judy Sheindlin Is the Highest-Paid Host on Television," 28 Nov. 2018 Shiru provides assistance to international sponsors covering hotel and transportation fees to the store location so businesses can pitch to students in person. Fox News, "Students ‘pay’ for coffee with personal data," 4 Oct. 2018 Boeing, on the other hand, has invited criticism for charging airlines an extra fee for information on the MCAS, rather than supplying it for free. Sam Blum, Popular Mechanics, "Report: Ethiopian Airlines Pilots Followed Boeing's Safety Procedures But Couldn't Prevent Crash," 3 Apr. 2019 The expungement provisions, which Murphy says would set New Jersey apart from any other state with legal weed, waive any fee for expungement processing and permit clearing of records for possession up to 5 pounds (2.3 kilograms). Mike Catalini, The Seattle Times, "New Jersey’s push to legalize recreational marijuana stalls," 25 Mar. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'fee.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of fee

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a(1)

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for fee

Noun

Middle English, from Anglo-French fé, fief, of Germanic origin; akin to Old English feoh cattle, property, Old High German fihu cattle; akin to Latin pecus cattle, pecunia money

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Dictionary Entries near fee

fed up

fed up of

fed up with

fee

feeb

fee bill

feeble

Statistics for fee

Last Updated

12 May 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for fee

The first known use of fee was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for fee

fee

noun

English Language Learners Definition of fee

: an amount of money that must be paid
: an amount that is paid for work done by a doctor, lawyer, etc.

fee

noun
\ ˈfē How to pronounce fee (audio) \

Kids Definition of fee

1 : an amount of money that must be paid A fee is charged to get into the park.
2 : a charge for services a doctor's fee

fee

noun

Legal Definition of fee

1 : an inheritable freehold estate in real property especially : fee simple — compare leasehold, life estate at estate
absolute fee
: a fee granted with no restrictions or limitations on alienability : fee simple absolute at fee simple
conditional fee
: a fee that is subject to a condition: as
a : fee simple conditional at fee simple
defeasible fee
: a fee that is subject to terminating or being terminated
determinable fee
: a defeasible fee that terminates automatically upon the occurrence of a specified event : fee simple determinable at fee simple
fee patent
: a fee simple absolute that is granted by a patent from the U.S. government also : a patent that grants a fee simple absolute the land shall have the same status as though such fee patent had never been issued U.S. Code

Note: Allotments of parcels of land in reservations are held in private ownership by fee patents.

fee tail
: a fee which is granted to an individual and to that individual's descendants, which is subject to a reversion or a remainder if a tenant in tail dies with no lineal descendants, and which is not freely alienable — see also entail entry 1, De Donis Conditionalibus — compare fee simple conditional at fee simple

Note: The fee tail developed out of the fee simple conditional as a means to ensure that property would remain intact and in the family. Instead of giving the grantee a fee simple absolute once he or she has a child, which the grantee could then alienate (as by selling), the fee tail creates a future interest in the descendants which prevents the grantee and the descendants from alienating the property. A fee tail is created by a conveyance to the grantee and to the heirs of the grantee's body. In most jurisdictions, the fee tail is not recognized.

2 : a fixed amount or percentage charged especially : a sum paid or charged for a service attorney fees
contingency fee
: a fee for the services of a lawyer paid upon successful completion of the services and usually calculated as a percentage of the gain obtained for the client

called also contingency, contingent fee

— compare champerty, maintenance
filing fee
: a fee charged for the filing of a document

Note: Filing fees are ordinarily charged in civil matters with the filing of the complaint.

jury fee
: a fee that is assessed in some courts as part of the cost of a civil jury trial
origination fee
: a fee charged by a lender for the preparation and processing of a loan
in fee
: under title that creates a fee

History and Etymology for fee

Middle English, fief, from Old French , fief, ultimately from a Germanic word akin to Old High German fehu cattle

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More from Merriam-Webster on fee

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with fee

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for fee

Spanish Central: Translation of fee

Nglish: Translation of fee for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of fee for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about fee

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