hire

noun
\ ˈhī(-ə)r How to pronounce hire (audio) \

Definition of hire

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : payment for the temporary use of something
b : payment for labor or personal services : wages
2a : the act or an instance of hiring (see hire entry 2) laws regarding the hire of workers
b : the state of being hired : employment
3 British : rental the hire of equipment often used attributively a hire car
4 : one who is hired starting wage for the new hires
for hire or less commonly on hire
: available for use or service in return for payment They have boats for hire. willing to do farm work for hire

hire

verb
hired; hiring

Definition of hire (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to engage the personal services of for a set sum hire a crew
b : to engage the temporary use of for a fixed sum hire a hall
2 : to grant the personal services of or temporary use of for a fixed sum hire themselves out
3 : to get done for pay hire the mowing done

intransitive verb

: to take employment hire out as a guide during the tourist season

Other Words from hire

Verb

hirer noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for hire

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Noun

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Choose the Right Synonym for hire

Verb

hire, let, lease, rent, charter mean to engage or grant for use at a price. hire and let, strictly speaking, are complementary terms, hire implying the act of engaging or taking for use and let the granting of use. we hired a car for the summer decided to let the cottage to a young couple lease strictly implies a letting under the terms of a contract but is often applied to hiring on a lease. the diplomat leased an apartment for a year rent stresses the payment of money for the full use of property and may imply either hiring or letting. instead of buying a house, they decided to rent will not rent to families with children charter applies to the hiring or letting of a vehicle usually for exclusive use. charter a bus to go to the game

Examples of hire in a Sentence

Noun The company has a few new hires. The hire of a car and other equipment will of course incur a supplementary charge. Verb She had very little office experience, so the company wouldn't hire her. We hired someone to clean the office once a week. The company isn't hiring right now.
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Entering Monday, when Harris' hire became official, the Tigers had a 55-91 record in 2022. Evan Petzold, Detroit Free Press, 21 Sep. 2022 Anderson and Arizona State announced Herm Edwards' hire as the new Arizona State coach not long thereafter. Jeremy Cluff, The Arizona Republic, 19 Sep. 2022 Bryan Harsin was hailed as an outside-the-box hire when Auburn plucked him away from Boise State. John Talty | Jtalty@al.com, al, 18 Sep. 2022 Edwards, a former NFL head coach, was considered an unconventional hire when he was tapped by Crow and Anderson to lead the middling program. The Salt Lake Tribune, 18 Sep. 2022 Edwards, a former NFL head coach, was considered an unconventional hire when he was tapped by Crow and Anderson to lead the middling program. John Marshall, ajc, 18 Sep. 2022 Edwards, a former NFL head coach, was considered an unconventional hire when he was tapped by school President Michael Crow and Anderson to lead the program. Catherine Ho, San Francisco Chronicle, 18 Sep. 2022 The discussion on power ratings and margin of victory will move forward, and with the fulltime presence of recent MIAA hire Jim Clark, the creator of the formula, there is optimism that the process will ultimately be more efficient. Craig Larson, BostonGlobe.com, 14 Sep. 2022 The fast start offers a glimpse at a bright future under Lincoln Riley, whose splashy hire sent expectations soaring in Heritage Hall. Los Angeles Times, 12 Sep. 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb After a brief discussion, the board voted to grant a waiver of a disqualifying offense and allow the school to hire Charles Coleman to work in the food service area. Lynn Kutter, Arkansas Online, 10 Sep. 2022 His solution was to give a 19-year-old cast member named Eddie Murphy as much airtime as possible and then to hire a few stars, including Billy Crystal and Martin Short. Emily Bobrow, WSJ, 9 Sep. 2022 While other parents might hire a clown or buy a cake, Viserys decides that the best way to honor his young son is to track down and kill the white hart, a fabled stag that resides in the King's Wood. Philip Ellis, Men's Health, 8 Sep. 2022 Florida has long grappled with shortages of correctional officers and recently has taken steps such as increasing pay to help hire and keep officers. Jim Saunders, Sun Sentinel, 6 Sep. 2022 The courier giant pays its drivers a competitive $95,000 a year including pension benefits, the highest amongst its competitors who often hire drivers on a contract basis. Prarthana Prakash, Fortune, 6 Sep. 2022 Employers across industries stampeded to hire en masse when the economy reopened, putting workers in the driver’s seat at a moment when federal stimulus packages had padded their budgets, enabling them to be more choosy. Erica Grieder, San Antonio Express-News, 5 Sep. 2022 The wealthy who resided on Eutaw Place or in Mount Vernon could keep their prize animals and others could rent a carriage and hire a driver. Jacques Kelly, Baltimore Sun, 3 Sep. 2022 The moves are a striking contrast with previous years, when the world's largest e-commerce company typically entered the fall rushing to open new facilities and hire thousands of workers to prepare for the holiday shopping season. Matt Day, BostonGlobe.com, 2 Sep. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'hire.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of hire

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for hire

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Old English hȳr; akin to Old Saxon hūria hire

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Time Traveler for hire

Time Traveler

The first known use of hire was before the 12th century

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Dictionary Entries Near hire

hirdum-dirdum

hire

hired girl

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Statistics for hire

Last Updated

24 Sep 2022

Cite this Entry

“Hire.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/hire. Accessed 24 Sep. 2022.

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More Definitions for hire

hire

verb
\ ˈhīr How to pronounce hire (audio) \
hired; hiring

Kids Definition of hire

1 : employ entry 1 sense 1 The company hired new workers.
2 : to get the temporary use of in return for pay They hired a hall for the party.
3 : to take a job He hired out as a cook.

hire

noun

Legal Definition of hire

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : payment for the temporary use of something or for labor or services
2a : the act or an instance of hiring from the date of hire until now
b : the state of being hired : employment while he was in the hire of the defendant
3 : one who is hired all new hires will enjoy the same medical benefits
for hire
: available for use or service in return for payment

hire

verb
hired; hiring

Legal Definition of hire (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to engage the personal services of or the temporary use of for a fixed sum
2 : to grant the personal services of or the temporary use of

intransitive verb

: to take employment

Other Words from hire

hirer noun

More from Merriam-Webster on hire

Nglish: Translation of hire for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of hire for Arabic Speakers

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