wage

noun
\ ˈwāj How to pronounce wage (audio) \

Definition of wage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a payment usually of money for labor or services usually according to contract and on an hourly, daily, or piecework basis often used in plural
b wages plural : the share of the national product attributable to labor as a factor in production
2 : recompense, reward usually used in plural but singular or plural in constructionthe wages of sin is death — Romans 6:23 (Revised Standard Version)

wage

verb
waged; waging

Definition of wage (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to engage in or carry on wage war wage a campaign

intransitive verb

: to be in process of occurring the riot waged for several hoursAmer. Guide Series: Md.

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Other Words from wage

Noun

wageless \ ˈwāj-​ləs How to pronounce wageless (audio) \ adjective

Examples of wage in a Sentence

Noun Both of them make decent wages. The table and chairs cost two weeks' wages. The company offers competitive wages and good benefits. The company gave workers a four percent wage increase this year. Verb They waged a guerrilla war against the government. Local activists are waging a campaign to end homelessness in the region.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun David Weil, who ran the Wage and Hour Division of the Department of Labor during Obama’s Presidency, told me that other recent rule changes similarly harm low-wage workers. Eyal Press, The New Yorker, "Trump’s Labor Secretary Is a Wrecking Ball Aimed at Workers," 19 Oct. 2020 The gun violence is rippling through neighborhoods populated by low-wage workers who are struggling to pay rent, neighborhoods inhabited by Black, Latino and Indigenous people who’ve been disproportionately impacted by the pandemic. Otis R. Taylor Jr., SFChronicle.com, "Illegal gun dealers making a killing by preying on vulnerable communities," 19 Oct. 2020 Low-wage workers were the hardest hit in San Diego County by job losses following stay-at-home orders, said the SANDAG report. Phillip Molnar, San Diego Union-Tribune, "San Diego County’s economy estimated to lose $12.4 billion this year," 15 Oct. 2020 Covid-19 has exacerbated inequality in the U.S., with job losses falling heavily on low-wage service workers and the virus disproportionately infecting and killing people of color. Ben Steverman, Bloomberg.com, "The 50 Richest Americans Are Worth as Much as the Poorest 165 Million," 8 Oct. 2020 Even and Macpherson’s study is among other analyses that indicate whatever gains minimum-wage workers make in pay will be offset by job losses, especially among small businesses. John Haughey, Washington Examiner, "Raising Florida's minimum wage to $15 will hurt workers, small businesses: Economists," 6 Oct. 2020 Pham will take over the Orlando Sentinel after the newspaper was honored this year for its coverage looking deeper at Florida tax laws, elder abuse in the guardianship system and the economic struggles facing low-wage tourism workers. Gabrielle Russon, orlandosentinel.com, "Orlando Sentinel Publisher Nancy Meyer departs; Paul Pham named interim GM," 1 Oct. 2020 But those provisions depend upon the specific contract language agreed to by both sides, and unions that represent lower-wage workers are often unable to get those kinds of guarantees. Chris Isidore, CNN, "California governor vetoes return-to-work bill for many laid-off workers," 1 Oct. 2020 Other priorities include pushing the incoming President to sign laws boosting pay for low-wage workers, and to curtail what the AFL-CIO regards as an epidemic of companies misclassifying employees as contract workers. Lee Clifford, Fortune, "What unions need from the 2020 election," 30 Sep. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb People may come to better appreciate the essential but unglamorous workers that keep their lives running and may be more sympathetic to wage demands. Nicholas Christakis, WSJ, "The Long Shadow of the Pandemic: 2024 and Beyond," 16 Oct. 2020 Senate Republicans likely have the numbers to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court, but Sen. Kamala Harris urged Democrats to wage political war over the nomination. Naomi Lim, Washington Examiner, "Kamala Harris: We'll fight to prevent Trump 'infection' from spreading to Supreme Court," 28 Sep. 2020 The song's rise to the top occurred just as the battle for the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) started to wage. Shannon Carlin, refinery29.com, "You Know Her Famous “I Am Woman” Lyrics, But Do You Know The Real Helen Reddy?," 11 Sep. 2020 Trump also talked that night about allegedly bad trade deals and lost jobs, attacked the Iran nuclear deal, and vowed to wage an aggressive war on terrorism. Usa Today Staff, USA TODAY, "RNC live: Trump signals attacks on Joe Biden at final night of Republican convention," 28 Aug. 2020 Supporters say the measure would allow for more diverse and more qualified candidates to run because candidates would not be forced to wage a large, citywide campaign. Kristen Taketa, San Diego Union-Tribune, "Two ballot measures aim to reform San Diego Unified’s school board," 7 Oct. 2020 Kelly, a former NASA astronaut and first-time candidate, has opted to wage a virtual campaign -- following party lines. Julia Musto, Fox News, "McSally trades jabs with Kelly ahead of critical Arizona Senate debate," 6 Oct. 2020 In the explosive flick, the five join forces to take down an elusive enemy threatening to wage another world war. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "The 355 Debuts a Killer First Trailer," 6 Oct. 2020 The result was to render the United States under permanent assault and require it to wage permanent war. Stephen Wertheim, The New Yorker, "How Trump Brought Home the Endless War," 1 Oct. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'wage.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of wage

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for wage

Noun

Middle English, pledge, recompense, from Anglo-French wage, gage, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German wetti pledge — more at wed

Verb

Middle English, to offer surety, put up as a stake, hire, from Anglo-French *wager, gager, from wage

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Time Traveler for wage

Time Traveler

The first known use of wage was in the 14th century

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Statistics for wage

Last Updated

22 Oct 2020

Cite this Entry

“Wage.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/wage. Accessed 26 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for wage

wage

noun
How to pronounce wage (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of wage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an amount of money that a worker is paid based on the number of hours, days, etc., that are worked

wage

verb

English Language Learners Definition of wage (Entry 2 of 2)

: to start and continue (a war, battle, etc.) in order to get or achieve something

wage

noun
\ ˈwāj How to pronounce wage (audio) \

Kids Definition of wage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: payment for work done especially when figured by the hour or day

wage

verb
waged; waging

Kids Definition of wage (Entry 2 of 2)

: to engage in : carry on The new police chief vowed to wage a fight against crime.

wage

noun

Legal Definition of wage

1 : a payment usually of money for labor or services usually according to a contract and on an hourly, daily, or piecework basis often used in pl.
2 plural : the share of the national product attributable to labor as a factor in production

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Comments on wage

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