wage

noun
\ ˈwāj \

Definition of wage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a payment usually of money for labor or services usually according to contract and on an hourly, daily, or piecework basis often used in plural
b wages plural : the share of the national product attributable to labor as a factor in production
2 : recompense, reward usually used in pl. but singular or plural in construction the wages of sin is death — Romans 6:23 (Revised Standard Version)

wage

verb
waged; waging

Definition of wage (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to engage in or carry on wage war wage a campaign

intransitive verb

: to be in process of occurring the riot waged for several hoursAmer. Guide Series: Md.

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Other Words from wage

Noun

wageless \ ˈwāj-​ləs \ adjective

Synonyms for wage

Synonyms: Noun

emolument, hire, packet [British], pay, paycheck, pay envelope, payment, salary, stipend

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Examples of wage in a Sentence

Noun

Both of them make decent wages. The table and chairs cost two weeks' wages. The company offers competitive wages and good benefits. The company gave workers a four percent wage increase this year.

Verb

They waged a guerrilla war against the government. Local activists are waging a campaign to end homelessness in the region.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Those wage gains were higher as recently as early 2009. Christopher Rugaber, The Seattle Times, "AP FACT CHECK: Trump’s speech exaggerates border peril," 6 Feb. 2019 Both women have been seen standing in solidarity with the people of Standing Rock, protesting big banks, campaigning for fair wages for restaurant workers, and walking in the Women's March together. Caroline Hallemann, Town & Country, "Looking Back at Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin's Decades-Long Friendship," 3 Feb. 2019 The more modest inflation rate should help to boost the spending power of Americans whose wage gains had been eaten up by higher prices. Josh Boak, Fox News, "US consumer prices rose an annual 2.7 percent in August," 13 Sep. 2018 Sanders’ bill isn’t specifically anti-Amazon, and other major companies — particularly Walmart, another frequent Sanders target — force large numbers of low-wage employees to rely on SNAP and other programs. Adi Robertson, The Verge, "Amazon accuses Sen. Bernie Sanders of misrepresenting worker pay, tells workers to send him positive stories," 29 Aug. 2018 Women in New Zealand are overrepresented in low-wage industries. Kayla Webley Adler, Marie Claire, "Meet Jacinda Ardern, Prime Minister of New Zealand," 23 July 2018 With more workers feeling assured of finding better employment, sustained wage gains may soon follow. Shobhana Chandra, chicagotribune.com, "A record number of Americans are quitting their jobs," 10 July 2018 Opponents say the work rules are unnecessary because most adults covered through the expansion already work, largely at low-wage or part-time jobs that don't include health coverage. Deborah Yetter, The Courier-Journal, "Kentucky may cut Medicaid for 500K if it loses court battle," 20 June 2018 That could spur faster wage gains and inflation as business compete more intensely for fewer available workers. Paul Davidson, USA TODAY, "Fed decision: Federal Reserve hikes rates to range of 1.75% to 2%, ups forecast to 4 hikes in '18," 13 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The quagmire has deepened of late, with the Taliban continuing to wage attacks on Afghan and allied troops. Jen Kirby, Vox, "Trump will reportedly remove 7,000 troops from Afghanistan," 21 Dec. 2018 Though severely weakened, Islamic State continues to wage an insurgency from remote hide-outs in Iraq, complicating efforts to reach and excavate some graves. Isabel Coles, WSJ, "Syria Unearths ISIS Mass Graves Near Iraqi Border," 13 Dec. 2018 Without the ability to file for bankruptcy, people can lose paycheck money to wage garnishment orders, cutting into already tight budgets, said Latife Neu, a bankruptcy lawyer. Peter Nicholas, WSJ, "Tax Refunds Will Be Paid During Shutdown, White House Says," 7 Jan. 2019 Warfare, whether real or fictional, is really about the individuals who wage it, and ultimately, that's what Hunter Killer gets right. Alex Hollings, Popular Mechanics, "What 'Hunter Killer' Gets Right About Submarine Warfare," 7 Nov. 2018 President Donald Trump would have broad authority to wage war against terrorists across the globe under a new proposal being crafted in the Senate — though Congress would win some key checks on his power. Chris Stirewalt, Fox News, "What firing Mueller would mean for the GOP," 10 Apr. 2018 The modern way to wage such a fight is with chemistry. Rob Dunn, Discover Magazine, "Our Attempts to Eradicate Insects are Just Making them Resistant to Pesticides," 16 Nov. 2018 This 6-1 vote ensures that the finance committee will continue to enjoy the strong participation of experienced members of the council and not become a place to use political appointees to wage surrogate battles in backrooms. Keith Curry, latimes.com, "Newport Beach City Council made a trio of sound financial decisions," 14 June 2018 His primary goal is to wage the most effective legal arguments on behalf of his client and to shield his client from liability. Michael Mccann, SI.com, "Michigan State Settles With the Victims of Larry Nassar's Abuse. How Might the NCAA Respond?," 18 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'wage.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of wage

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for wage

Noun

Middle English, pledge, recompense, from Anglo-French wage, gage, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German wetti pledge — more at wed

Verb

Middle English, to offer surety, put up as a stake, hire, from Anglo-French *wager, gager, from wage

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Statistics for wage

Last Updated

13 Feb 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for wage

The first known use of wage was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for wage

wage

noun

English Language Learners Definition of wage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an amount of money that a worker is paid based on the number of hours, days, etc., that are worked

wage

verb

English Language Learners Definition of wage (Entry 2 of 2)

: to start and continue (a war, battle, etc.) in order to get or achieve something

wage

noun
\ ˈwāj \

Kids Definition of wage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: payment for work done especially when figured by the hour or day

wage

verb
waged; waging

Kids Definition of wage (Entry 2 of 2)

: to engage in : carry on The new police chief vowed to wage a fight against crime.

wage

noun

Legal Definition of wage

1 : a payment usually of money for labor or services usually according to a contract and on an hourly, daily, or piecework basis often used in pl.
2  plural : the share of the national product attributable to labor as a factor in production

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More from Merriam-Webster on wage

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with wage

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for wage

Spanish Central: Translation of wage

Nglish: Translation of wage for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of wage for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about wage

Comments on wage

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