recruit

1 of 2

verb

re·​cruit ri-ˈkrüt How to pronounce recruit (audio)
recruited; recruiting; recruits

transitive verb

1
a(1)
: to fill up the number of with new members : reinforce
recruit an army
(2)
: to enlist as a member of an armed service
b
: to increase or maintain the number of
America recruited her population from Europe
c
: to secure the services of : engage, hire
d
: to seek to enroll
recruit prospective students
2
3
: to restore or increase the health, vigor, or intensity of

intransitive verb

: to enlist new members
recruiter noun

recruit

2 of 2

noun

1
: a fresh or additional supply
2
: a newcomer to a field or activity
specifically : a newly enlisted or drafted member of the armed forces
3
: a former enlisted man of the lowest rank in the army

Examples of recruit in a Sentence

Verb He was recruited by the army after high school. Public schools are recruiting new teachers. College football coaches spend a lot of time recruiting high school athletes. College football coaches spend a lot of time recruiting. Some parents don't think the military should be recruiting from high schools. We recruited a crew of volunteers to help us. I recruited my brother to drive us to the concert. She recruited four friends to distribute food to the homeless with her. Noun the newest recruit on the team She's one of the department's new recruits. See More
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
Portman and Millepied, 46, first connected when her was recruited to choreograph Black Swan and train star Portman in the art of ballet. Jen Juneau, Peoplemag, 21 Feb. 2024 To keep things moving, the first place to start is to recruit a team to work on this with a review, plan development and measurable implementation. Wayne Elsey, Forbes, 21 Feb. 2024 While his Chinese clients rarely reveal anything about the bosses that recruited them, Renwick said he’s gleaned some information from evidence that has come out in court proceedings. Stuart Leavenworth, Sacramento Bee, 21 Feb. 2024 Liu Jie, the garrison’s commander, said the militia would assist the army in duties such as providing jobs to demobilized veterans or recruiting soldiers for the military. Laura He, CNN, 20 Feb. 2024 The capture of hundreds of soldiers, especially those with battlefield experience, would make the need for more troops more acute and complicate the effort to recruit more. Eric Schmitt, New York Times, 20 Feb. 2024 In Drumline, starring Nick Cannon, a Harlem teenager is recruited by an intense band director. Lynnette Nicholas, Parents, 16 Feb. 2024 And the state has managed, by hook and by crook, to continue recruiting men into the armed forces. Keith Gessen, The New Yorker, 15 Feb. 2024 Rothwell recruited Vera Santamaria (Hulu’s Pen15) to serve as co-showrunner on the series. Lesley Goldberg, The Hollywood Reporter, 9 Feb. 2024
Noun
Lame will play a food delivery driver turned CIA recruit who is up against a group of arms dealers in Europe. Adam Wescott, Forbes, 21 Feb. 2024 The fire department is training and hiring several new recruits this year to bolster their staffing. Harriet Ramos, Fort Worth Star-Telegram, 8 Feb. 2024 The newer draft language indicates that the mobilizations will have a 36-month cap and include exemptions for potential recruits from higher education or specialized fields. Peter Aitken, Fox News, 3 Feb. 2024 The Ducks could now be in a position to land the first five-star recruit from the state of Idaho. Jon Wilner, The Mercury News, 1 Feb. 2024 The Broncos’ class is highlighted by two former five-star recruits: former USC quarterback Malachi Nelson and wide receiver Chris Marshall, who is the No. 1 junior college recruit in the country. Ron Counts, Idaho Statesman, 9 Feb. 2024 Dwight received confirmation that Black pilots were being accepted into flying programs, and in 1953 joined 33 other Black recruits. J.m. Banks, Kansas City Star, 7 Feb. 2024 Each class of recruits is expected to memorize the location and use of emergency equipment on every aircraft type the airline flies. Bobby Laurie, Condé Nast Traveler, 7 Feb. 2024 Amanda Warren will play veteran night agent Catherine, who leads the investigative program and oversees training the new recruits. Emily Blackwood, Peoplemag, 6 Feb. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'recruit.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

French recrute, recrue fresh growth, new levy of soldiers, from Middle French, from recroistre to grow up again, from Latin recrescere, from re- + crescere to grow — more at crescent

First Known Use

Verb

1642, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a(1)

Noun

1645, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of recruit was in 1642

Dictionary Entries Near recruit

Cite this Entry

“Recruit.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/recruit. Accessed 26 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

recruit

1 of 2 verb
re·​cruit ri-ˈkrüt How to pronounce recruit (audio)
1
a
: to increase the number of by enlisting new members
b
: to get the services of : engage
recruited new teachers
2
: replenish
recruited their finances
3
: to return or increase the health, energy, or strength of
recruiter noun
recruitment
-ˈkrüt-mənt
noun

recruit

2 of 2 noun
: a newcomer to a field or activity
especially : a newly enlisted or drafted member of the armed forces
Etymology

Noun

from French recrute, recrue (noun) "new growth, a batch of new soldiers," derived from early French recroistre "to grow up again," from Latin recrescere (same meaning), from re- "again" and crescere "to grow"

Word Origin
The French formed the noun recrute, meaning "fresh growth," from their verb recroistre "to grow up again." This verb was taken from the Latin verb recrescere, which had the same meaning. Later, someone saw a likeness between "a fresh growth of plants" and "a fresh supply of soldiers." Thus they began using the word recrute for the new soldiers. In the 17th century this sense of recrute came to the attention of the English. They borrowed the word as recruit and began using it as a verb and noun. In time it acquired broader senses not related to the military.

Medical Definition

recruit

transitive verb
re·​cruit ri-ˈkrüt How to pronounce recruit (audio)
: to restore or increase the health, vigor, or intensity of

More from Merriam-Webster on recruit

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