deport

verb
de·​port | \ di-ˈpȯrt How to pronounce deport (audio) , dē- \
deported; deporting; deports

Definition of deport

transitive verb

1 [Latin deportare]
a : to send out of the country by legal deportation
b : to carry away
2 : to behave or comport (oneself) especially in accord with a code

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Choose the Right Synonym for deport

banish, exile, deport, transport mean to remove by authority from a state or country. banish implies compulsory removal from a country not necessarily one's own. banished for seditious activities exile may imply compulsory removal or an enforced or voluntary absence from one's own country. a writer who exiled himself for political reasons deport implies sending out of the country an alien who has illegally entered or whose presence is judged inimical to the public welfare. illegal aliens will be deported transport implies sending a convicted criminal to an overseas penal colony. a convict who was transported to Australia

behave, conduct, deport, comport, acquit mean to act or to cause oneself to do something in a certain way. behave may apply to the meeting of a standard of what is proper or decorous. the children behaved in church conduct implies action or behavior that shows the extent of one's power to control or direct oneself. conducted herself with unfailing good humor deport implies behaving so as to show how far one conforms to conventional rules of discipline or propriety. the hero deported himself in accord with the code of chivalry comport suggests conduct measured by what is expected or required of one in a certain class or position. comported themselves as gentlemen acquit applies to action under stress that deserves praise or meets expectations. acquitted herself well in her first assignment

Examples of deport in a Sentence

Thousands of immigrants had been illegally deported. deported them back to their country of birth
Recent Examples on the Web Roughly 10,000 political opponents were deported to penal colonies. Susanna Lee, The Conversation, "We’re living in the bizarre world that Flaubert envisioned," 10 Jan. 2020 Seven hundred seventy-six Jewish children under the age of 14 were deported there, and just 35 of them survived, one of these being Liliana. Nr Editors, National Review, "The Week," 19 Dec. 2019 The proposal follows two rulings issued by Attorney General William P. Barr in October that expanded the government’s powers to deport immigrants with criminal violations. Nick Miroff, Washington Post, "Trump proposal would deny asylum to immigrants convicted of low-level crimes," 18 Dec. 2019 However, the campaign has had to overcome activists protesting his role in standing alongside Obama-era policy to deport 3 million undocumented immigrants and pitching more moderate immigration policies than some of his opponents. Benjamin Pu, NBC News, "Andrew Yang criss-crosses Iowa in bus tour," 12 Dec. 2019 El Mencho was deported in 1997 and then traveled to Tijuana. Beth Warren, courier-journal.com, "A ruthless Mexican drug lord’s empire is devastating families with its grip on small-town USA," 25 Nov. 2019 Immediately after Trump took office in 2017 with promises to quickly deport unauthorized immigrants, the number of border apprehensions plunged. Maria Sacchetti, Anchorage Daily News, "‘Bodies flew everywhere’: A border chase shows role U.S. citizens play in immigration smuggling," 1 Nov. 2019 O'Rourke's plan would also no longer allow marijuana charges to be considered grounds for denying citizenship or deporting immigrants. chicagotribune.com, "O’Rourke calls for taxing marijuana industry to support those harmed by war on drugs," 20 Sep. 2019 The result of this would be the Trump administration achieving its explicit goals of deporting undocumented immigrants at unprecedented scale. David Carroll, Quartz, "China embraces its surveillance state. The US pretends it doesn’t have one," 23 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'deport.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of deport

1598, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for deport

Middle French deporter, from Latin deportare to carry away, from de- + portare to carry — more at fare

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Time Traveler for deport

Time Traveler

The first known use of deport was in 1598

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Statistics for deport

Last Updated

25 Jan 2020

Cite this Entry

“Deport.” The Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Inc., https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/deporting. Accessed 29 January 2020.

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More Definitions for deport

deport

verb
How to pronounce deport (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of deport

: to force (a person who is not a citizen) to leave a country

deport

verb
de·​port | \ di-ˈpȯrt How to pronounce deport (audio) \
deported; deporting

Kids Definition of deport

1 : behave sense 1, conduct The children deported themselves well.
2 : to force (a person who is not a citizen) to leave a country
de·​port | \ di-ˈpōrt How to pronounce deport (audio) \

Legal Definition of deport

: to send (an alien) out of a country by order of deportation — compare exclude

Other Words from deport

deportable adjective

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More from Merriam-Webster on deport

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for deport

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with deport

Spanish Central: Translation of deport

Nglish: Translation of deport for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of deport for Arabic Speakers

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