deport

verb
de·​port | \ di-ˈpȯrt How to pronounce deport (audio) , dē-\
deported; deporting; deports

Definition of deport

transitive verb

1 [ Latin deportare ]

a : to send out of the country by legal deportation
b : to carry away
2 : to behave or comport (oneself) especially in accord with a code

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Choose the Right Synonym for deport

banish, exile, deport, transport mean to remove by authority from a state or country. banish implies compulsory removal from a country not necessarily one's own. banished for seditious activities exile may imply compulsory removal or an enforced or voluntary absence from one's own country. a writer who exiled himself for political reasons deport implies sending out of the country an alien who has illegally entered or whose presence is judged inimical to the public welfare. illegal aliens will be deported transport implies sending a convicted criminal to an overseas penal colony. a convict who was transported to Australia

behave, conduct, deport, comport, acquit mean to act or to cause oneself to do something in a certain way. behave may apply to the meeting of a standard of what is proper or decorous. the children behaved in church conduct implies action or behavior that shows the extent of one's power to control or direct oneself. conducted herself with unfailing good humor deport implies behaving so as to show how far one conforms to conventional rules of discipline or propriety. the hero deported himself in accord with the code of chivalry comport suggests conduct measured by what is expected or required of one in a certain class or position. comported themselves as gentlemen acquit applies to action under stress that deserves praise or meets expectations. acquitted herself well in her first assignment

Examples of deport in a Sentence

Thousands of immigrants had been illegally deported. deported them back to their country of birth

Recent Examples on the Web

This may go a long way to explaining how hundreds of U.S. citizens have been detained or deported by ICE. Luke Darby, GQ, "Border Patrol Stopped U.S. Citizens for Speaking Spanish in Montana," 21 May 2018 About 61,000 people were deported after January 20, 2018, an increase of 37 percent over the same time period. Maria Clark, NOLA.com, "SCOTUS strikes down part of mandatory deportation law: report," 17 Apr. 2018 Among the more than 11,000 migrants who died attempting to cross the Mediterranean between 2014 and 2017, one was the wife of another Eritrean friend deported from Israel. Brian Goldstone, The New Republic, "Essential reporting, interpretation, and opinion on politics and culture. Don't miss our latest.," 26 June 2018 Legal and genetics experts also worry that DNA could be stored and accessed by the same federal agencies that investigate crimes and deport immigrants. Catherine Ho, SFChronicle.com, "Effort to use DNA tests to reunite migrant families is paused," 26 June 2018 Five residents of Little Mexico had been deported, and 34 others remained in detention, including Alex's mother. Eli Saslow, Anchorage Daily News, "Raids are separating families in the heartland," 1 July 2018 In December, he was ordered deported but was granted a stay of removal on humanitarian grounds. Kathleen Mcwilliams, courant.com, "Wesleyan Janitor Facing Deportation Honored By University For Service To Students," 28 June 2018 Once released, he'll be arrested again and deported back to Mexico, according to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Mark Price, charlotteobserver, "He set fire for revenge, leaving 130 homeless. Prison is only part of his punishment.," 7 June 2018 At the end of his 39-month prison term, Chavez-Pina will be deported. John Diedrich, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Man in U.S. illegally stole $1 million from taxpayers. Now he's going to prison for 39 months.," 29 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'deport.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of deport

1598, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for deport

Middle French deporter, from Latin deportare to carry away, from de- + portare to carry — more at fare

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Statistics for deport

Last Updated

17 May 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for deport

The first known use of deport was in 1598

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More Definitions for deport

deport

verb

English Language Learners Definition of deport

: to force (a person who is not a citizen) to leave a country

deport

verb
de·​port | \ di-ˈpȯrt How to pronounce deport (audio) \
deported; deporting

Kids Definition of deport

1 : behave sense 1, conduct The children deported themselves well.
2 : to force (a person who is not a citizen) to leave a country
de·​port | \ di-ˈpōrt How to pronounce deport (audio) \

Legal Definition of deport

: to send (an alien) out of a country by order of deportation — compare exclude

Other Words from deport

deportable adjective

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More from Merriam-Webster on deport

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with deport

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for deport

Spanish Central: Translation of deport

Nglish: Translation of deport for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of deport for Arabic Speakers

Comments on deport

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