deport

verb
de·​port | \ di-ˈpȯrt How to pronounce deport (audio) , dē-\
deported; deporting; deports

Definition of deport

transitive verb

1 [ Latin deportare ]

a : to send out of the country by legal deportation
b : to carry away
2 : to behave or comport (oneself) especially in accord with a code

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Choose the Right Synonym for deport

banish, exile, deport, transport mean to remove by authority from a state or country. banish implies compulsory removal from a country not necessarily one's own. banished for seditious activities exile may imply compulsory removal or an enforced or voluntary absence from one's own country. a writer who exiled himself for political reasons deport implies sending out of the country an alien who has illegally entered or whose presence is judged inimical to the public welfare. illegal aliens will be deported transport implies sending a convicted criminal to an overseas penal colony. a convict who was transported to Australia

behave, conduct, deport, comport, acquit mean to act or to cause oneself to do something in a certain way. behave may apply to the meeting of a standard of what is proper or decorous. the children behaved in church conduct implies action or behavior that shows the extent of one's power to control or direct oneself. conducted herself with unfailing good humor deport implies behaving so as to show how far one conforms to conventional rules of discipline or propriety. the hero deported himself in accord with the code of chivalry comport suggests conduct measured by what is expected or required of one in a certain class or position. comported themselves as gentlemen acquit applies to action under stress that deserves praise or meets expectations. acquitted herself well in her first assignment

Examples of deport in a Sentence

Thousands of immigrants had been illegally deported. deported them back to their country of birth

Recent Examples on the Web

Under the bill, migrants who do not consent to the test would be deported, Gooden said. Dallas News, "More secret tape fallout in Texas House, Beto O'Rourke's reboot, Dallas mayor creates crime task force," 20 Aug. 2019 But so far, the candidates mostly haven’t gotten into details about who should be deported and who should be allowed into the US. Tara Golshan, Vox, "The 2020 Democratic immigration debate, explained," 29 July 2019 Under this unlawful plan, immigrants who have lived here for years would be deported with less due process than people get in traffic court,’’ said Omar Jawdat, director of the ACLU’s Immigrants’ Rights Project. Elliot Spagat, BostonGlobe.com, "Trump expands fast-track deportation authority across US," 22 July 2019 So far, Trump’s statistics show that 256,085 people were deported in fiscal year 2018 alone. Kynala Phillips, Essence, "Recent ICE Raids Around The Country Put Immigrant Communities on Edge," 15 July 2019 Around the time Cetindemir was told he would be deported, the CBP gave him access to his phone. Kaelyn Lynch, Outside Online, "A Denali Climber's Experience Being Detained by ICE," 15 July 2019 Mr Shah insists that all these people will be deported. The Economist, "India’s hunt for “illegal immigrants” is aimed at Muslims," 11 July 2019 If a member of your family is arrested or deported, take immediate action to know where that person is and what led to the arrest and possible deportation, experts advise. Yvonne H. Valdez, sun-sentinel.com, "Uneasy South Florida immigrant community braces for possible ICE raids," 11 July 2019 Central American children, who under immigration law cannot be immediately deported back to their origin country, are supposed to be moved to facilities managed by the Department of Health and Human Services within 72 hours. Zolan Kanno-youngs, New York Times, "Government Watchdog Finds Squalid Conditions in Border Centers," 2 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'deport.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of deport

1598, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for deport

Middle French deporter, from Latin deportare to carry away, from de- + portare to carry — more at fare

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Statistics for deport

Last Updated

6 Sep 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for deport

The first known use of deport was in 1598

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More Definitions for deport

deport

verb

English Language Learners Definition of deport

: to force (a person who is not a citizen) to leave a country

deport

verb
de·​port | \ di-ˈpȯrt How to pronounce deport (audio) \
deported; deporting

Kids Definition of deport

1 : behave sense 1, conduct The children deported themselves well.
2 : to force (a person who is not a citizen) to leave a country
de·​port | \ di-ˈpōrt How to pronounce deport (audio) \

Legal Definition of deport

: to send (an alien) out of a country by order of deportation — compare exclude

Other Words from deport

deportable adjective

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More from Merriam-Webster on deport

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with deport

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for deport

Spanish Central: Translation of deport

Nglish: Translation of deport for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of deport for Arabic Speakers

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