exclude

verb
ex·​clude | \ ik-ˈsklüd How to pronounce exclude (audio) \
excluded; excluding

Definition of exclude

transitive verb

1a : to prevent or restrict the entrance of
b : to bar from participation, consideration, or inclusion
2 : to expel or bar especially from a place or position previously occupied

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Other Words from exclude

excluder noun

Examples of exclude in a Sentence

You can share files with some people on the network while excluding others. The prices on the menu exclude tax.
Recent Examples on the Web Behavioral interviewing can exclude people rather than include them. Meg O'connell, Forbes, 11 Oct. 2021 And those figures — already dismal when compared with other rich countries — exclude millions of Americans whose jobs don’t include paid time off. Washington Post, 7 Oct. 2021 That included an ultimately unsuccessful effort to exclude people living in the country illegally. Jennifer Peltz And Marina Villeneuve, Star Tribune, 26 Apr. 2021 World Nomads offers travel insurance that doesn’t exclude scuba diving and many other extreme or hazardous sports. Chauncey Crail, Robb Report, 12 Sep. 2021 Falsey also said that a majority of Anchorage’s city employees are part of a labor union or bargaining unit and that the idea was not to exclude them but to negotiate parental leave at the bargaining table. Emily Goodykoontz, Anchorage Daily News, 1 Sep. 2021 His response is to exclude the unvaccinated from many of the functions of daily life. The Editorial Board, WSJ, 3 Aug. 2021 Hill argued that the system doesn’t totally exclude white people, saying a small percentage of white people on the waiting list do get a vaccine appointment. Emma Colton, Washington Examiner, 22 Apr. 2021 Specially appointed Judge Pam Baschab during a status hearing this afternoon denied a request from Blakely’s attorneys to exclude such evidence. Ashley Remkus | Aremkus@al.com, al, 13 Apr. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'exclude.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of exclude

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for exclude

Middle English, from Latin excludere, from ex- + claudere to close — more at close entry 1

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Time Traveler for exclude

Time Traveler

The first known use of exclude was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near exclude

excludable

exclude

exclusible

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Statistics for exclude

Last Updated

14 Oct 2021

Cite this Entry

“Exclude.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/exclude. Accessed 17 Oct. 2021.

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More Definitions for exclude

exclude

verb

English Language Learners Definition of exclude

: to prevent (someone) from doing something or being a part of a group
: to leave out (something) : to not include (something)
: to think that (something, such as a possibility) is not worth attention

exclude

verb
ex·​clude | \ ik-ˈsklüd How to pronounce exclude (audio) \
excluded; excluding

Kids Definition of exclude

: to shut out : keep out Don't exclude your little sister from the game.

exclude

transitive verb
ex·​clude | \ ik-ˈsklüd How to pronounce exclude (audio) \
excluded; excluding

Legal Definition of exclude

1 : to prevent or restrict the entry or admission of exclude hearsay evidence
2 : to remove from participation, consideration, or inclusion (as in insurance coverage)

More from Merriam-Webster on exclude

Nglish: Translation of exclude for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of exclude for Arabic Speakers

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