exile

noun
ex·​ile | \ ˈeg-ˌzī(-ə)l How to pronounce exile (audio) , ˈek-ˌsī(-ə)l How to pronounce exile (audio) \

Definition of exile

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : the state or a period of forced absence from one's country or home
b : the state or a period of voluntary absence from one's country or home
2 : a person who is in exile

exile

verb
exiled; exiling

Definition of exile (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to banish or expel from one's own country or home

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Other Words from exile

Noun

exilic \ eg-​ˈzi-​lik How to pronounce exile (audio) \ adjective

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Verb

banish, exile, deport, transport mean to remove by authority from a state or country. banish implies compulsory removal from a country not necessarily one's own. banished for seditious activities exile may imply compulsory removal or an enforced or voluntary absence from one's own country. a writer who exiled himself for political reasons deport implies sending out of the country an alien who has illegally entered or whose presence is judged inimical to the public welfare. illegal aliens will be deported transport implies sending a convicted criminal to an overseas penal colony. a convict who was transported to Australia

Examples of exile in a Sentence

Noun They hoped that his exile would be temporary. Many chose to live as exiles rather than face persecution. Verb with their conquest of the Moors complete, Ferdinand and Isabella next exiled the Jews from Spain
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun But from his wife Jamie knows that three years hence the shot heard round the world will be fired, and the result will be independence—with those loyal to the King either dead or in exile. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "Outlander Season 6: Everything We Know," 10 Feb. 2021 But at the same time, the journey that saw Brown go from disgruntled star Steeler, to sideshow freak Raider, to cameo-appearance Patriot, to NFL exile and back to the field as a Buccaneer supporting cast member also seems to have emboldened him. Mike Jones, USA TODAY, "Opinion: If Bucs' Antonio Brown wants to repair his legacy, he must understand he brought problems on himself," 3 Feb. 2021 Last year, the Trump administration started requiring refugees to provide addresses dating back 10 years, a near impossible task for people living in exile. Julie Watson, Star Tribune, "Broken by Trump, US refugee program aims to return stronger," 27 Jan. 2021 Meanwhile, Resources for the Future, an environmental think tank that has effectively served as an IWG-in-exile, has sponsored work to improve the base economic projections used by IAMs. Paul Voosen, Science | AAAS, "Trump downplayed the costs of carbon pollution. That’s about to change," 22 Jan. 2021 Wong, who helped many protesters arrested during anti-government demonstrations in 2019, also founded a restaurant in Taiwan that employs Hong Kongers living in exile there. Washington Post, "Hong Kong authorities arrest 11 over activists’ attempted Taiwan boat escape," 14 Jan. 2021 For months, Uighurs in exile had urged the court to investigate China’s repressive policies against Muslim minorities, the first attempt by activists to use the force of international law to hold Chinese officials accountable for the crackdown. New York Times, "I.C.C. Won’t Investigate China’s Detention of Muslims," 15 Dec. 2020 Benito Juarez, who was president of Mexico when its army defeated European invaders on May 5, 1862, had lived for 18 months in exile in New Orleans; the city honored him with his statue on Basin Street. Staff Reports, NOLA.com, "NOPD 4th District supervisors honored, and more metro community news," 13 Jan. 2021 President Hadi, in exile in Saudi Arabia, had announced a Cabinet reshuffle earlier this month. Greg Norman, Fox News, "Explosion rocks Yemen airport in 'cowardly terrorist attack' as new Cabinet members land," 31 Dec. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb And it was used frequently in the 480s B.C. to exile the family and supporters of Athens’s previous tyrant, Hippias. Grant Addison, Washington Examiner, "Then and Now: Ostracism," 4 Feb. 2021 Three of his key opponents, including former prime minister Lionel Zinsou, have had to flee to exile. Stephen Kafeero, Quartz Africa, "These are the key African elections to watch in 2021," 13 Jan. 2021 The boys, now men, are the last connection to a lost home for their followers, who have dispersed across the world, from refugee camps in Thailand to exile communities in places like New Zealand and North Carolina. Hannah Beech, New York Times, "‘We Were Bulletproof’: As Child Soldiers Grow Up, Legacy of War Lingers," 12 Oct. 2020 One following the contemporary Arab cultural movement will notice, especially in the final third of the century that has just passed, that there is a tendency in this movement to put ‘the other’ on trial, then to exile and evict him. Sam Sweeney, National Review, "The Zero-Sum Game of Syrian Politics," 6 Sep. 2020 To be exiled from a group or to see our group crushed by its enemies, could mean death. Osita Nwanevu, The New Republic, "We’re Not Polarized Enough," 19 May 2020 One way to end would be to have Carrie exiled in Russia and living in some Soviet-like apartment block in an incredibly grim situation, isolated from the world like Ed Snowden. James Hibberd, EW.com, "Homeland showrunner breaks down shocking series finale, explains final scene," 27 Apr. 2020 Caputo’s former client fled Putin and now is exiled in Germany. Deroy Murdock, National Review, "A Patriot and a Professional," 17 Apr. 2020 The other coronaviruses have long been around, so a certain part of the population has immunity, which may help exile those viruses under unfavorable conditions. Jon Cohen, Science | AAAS, "Why do dozens of diseases wax and wane with the seasons—and will COVID-19?," 13 Mar. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'exile.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of exile

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for exile

Noun

Middle English exil, from Anglo-French essil, exil, from Latin exilium, from exul, exsul an exile

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Time Traveler for exile

Time Traveler

The first known use of exile was in the 14th century

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Statistics for exile

Last Updated

22 Feb 2021

Cite this Entry

“Exile.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/exile. Accessed 1 Mar. 2021.

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More Definitions for exile

exile

noun

English Language Learners Definition of exile

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a situation in which you are forced to leave your country or home and go to live in a foreign country
: a period of time during which someone has lived in exile
: a person who has been forced to live in a foreign country : a person who is in exile

exile

verb

English Language Learners Definition of exile (Entry 2 of 2)

: to force (someone) to go to live in a distant place or foreign country : to force (someone) into exile

exile

noun
ex·​ile | \ ˈeg-ˌzīl How to pronounce exile (audio) , ˈek-ˌsīl \

Kids Definition of exile

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the situation of a person who is forced to leave his or her own country He's living in exile.
2 : the period of time someone is forced to live away from his or her country a 20 year exile
3 : a person who is forced to leave his or her own country

exile

verb
exiled; exiling

Kids Definition of exile (Entry 2 of 2)

: to force (someone) to leave his or her own country

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Comments on exile

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