exile

noun
ex·ile | \ ˈeg-ˌzī(-ə)l , ˈek-ˌsī(-ə)l \

Definition of exile 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1a : the state or a period of forced absence from one's country or home

b : the state or a period of voluntary absence from one's country or home

2 : a person who is in exile

exile

verb
exiled; exiling

Definition of exile (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to banish or expel from one's own country or home

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Other words from exile

Noun

exilic \eg-ˈzi-lik \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for exile

Verb

banish, exile, deport, transport mean to remove by authority from a state or country. banish implies compulsory removal from a country not necessarily one's own. banished for seditious activities exile may imply compulsory removal or an enforced or voluntary absence from one's own country. a writer who exiled himself for political reasons deport implies sending out of the country an alien who has illegally entered or whose presence is judged inimical to the public welfare. illegal aliens will be deported transport implies sending a convicted criminal to an overseas penal colony. a convict who was transported to Australia

Examples of exile in a Sentence

Noun

They hoped that his exile would be temporary. Many chose to live as exiles rather than face persecution.

Verb

with their conquest of the Moors complete, Ferdinand and Isabella next exiled the Jews from Spain
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

From the mass exodus of Cuban exiles to Hurricane Andrew’s wrath to today’s surge of new residents from South America and Russia, agents like me have learned to roll with these changes accordingly. Donna Bloom, miamiherald, "In 50 years of Miami real estate, I’ve seen these five big changes," 29 June 2018 The Provisional Government in Petrograd would have collaborated in an evacuation of the Romanovs, but in London it was keenly hoped that some other place of exile would be found. The Economist, "How the royal houses of Europe abandoned the Romanovs," 28 June 2018 Yet with Mikhail, there is always the echo of exile. Elizabeth Toohey, The Christian Science Monitor, "Poet and Iraqi exile Dunya Mikhail's book 'The Beekeeper' serves as testimony for the victims of ISIS," 29 Mar. 2018 One of the exiles is Spots, whose owner happens to be the mayor’s ward, a boy by the name of Atari (Koyu Rankin). John Cassidy, The New Yorker, "“Tomb Raider” and “Isle of Dogs,” Reviewed," 15 Mar. 2018 The company was made up of exiles from Walt Disney Production, artists who had organized and participated in a 1941 labor strike against the Mickey Mouse giant, according to Abraham's book. The Washington Post, AL.com, "Who is the real Mr. Magoo? Sessions or Trump?," 1 Mar. 2018 Despite the passage of time, some exile groups and politicians are growing more insistent that Castro, who retired from the Cuban presidency on April 19, should be held responsible. Mimi Whitefield, miamiherald, "Seven members of Congress say now is the time to indict Raúl Castro," 12 July 2018 The leaders of the Cambodia National Rescue Party, or C.N.R.P., have been jailed or driven into exile, and lower-ranking members were harassed into joining Mr. Hun Sen’s party or getting out of politics. Julia Wallace, New York Times, "‘Fireflies’ and ‘Ghosts’ in Cambodia Prop Up Facade of Real Election," 11 July 2018 As well as Iranian exiles, President Donald Trump's lawyer was among the American speakers at the event, which took place in a huge, packed hall in an exhibition center north of Paris. NBC News, "Giuliani attended French event where terror plot thwarted," 2 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Qu, a royal adviser in the state of Chu, tried warn the king of impending danger, only to be exiled. Casey Quackenbush, Time, "Here's What to Know About Asia's Annual Dragon Boat Festival," 18 June 2018 The two also undoubtedly have seen the criticism by Saudi and Emirati media of Qatar's ruling emir, 38-year-old Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, which has included promoting exiled Qataris as possible leaders for the country. Jon Gambrell, Fox News, "Analysis: Qatar crisis widens fissures among US allies," 4 June 2018 But the court battle continues, with the man sitting in a jail cell in Iraq while the Trump administration tries to find a way to exile him to Saudi Arabia. Zachary Fryer-biggs, Vox, "The Pentagon says he tried to help ISIS. Now they want to ship this American to Saudi Arabia without a trial.," 27 Apr. 2018 Ojeda’s family had been exiled from Cuba in the 1960s. Cassie Owens, Philly.com, "Philly's Gabriel Ojeda-Sague explores identity through Jazzercise in book of poems," 16 Apr. 2018 Blackwell’s Island housed the first and arguably the worst institutions in which the city of New York once exiled the poor, the mad, the criminal and the sick. Patrick Mcgrath, New York Times, "A Dumping Ground for the Poor, the Criminal and the Mad," 28 June 2018 Though Prospero has been exiled from Milan, and has learned sorcery from books to control the island, Miranda knows nothing of her own background. Josephine Livingstone, The New Republic, "Puzzled by Westworld? Look to Shakespeare.," 26 June 2018 Enes supports Fethullah Gulen, a Turkish spiritual leader that lives exiled in Pennsylvania. Jenna West, SI.com, "Enes Kanter's Father Charged As Terror Group Member by Turkish Government," 18 June 2018 Armstrong, Landis charges, pressured other cyclists to dope, thereby putting those cyclists in an awkward position to either follow the leader and break the law or defy him and be exiled from the team. Michael Mccann, SI.com, "Was It the Right Decision for Lance Armstrong to Settle in His Lawsuit With the U.S. Government?," 21 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'exile.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of exile

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for exile

Noun

Middle English exil, from Anglo-French essil, exil, from Latin exilium, from exul, exsul an exile

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Dictionary Entries near exile

exiguous

exilarch

exilarchate

exile

exiler

exilian

exility

Phrases Related to exile

tax exile

Statistics for exile

Last Updated

8 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for exile

The first known use of exile was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for exile

exile

noun

English Language Learners Definition of exile

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a situation in which you are forced to leave your country or home and go to live in a foreign country

: a period of time during which someone has lived in exile

: a person who has been forced to live in a foreign country : a person who is in exile

exile

verb

English Language Learners Definition of exile (Entry 2 of 2)

: to force (someone) to go to live in a distant place or foreign country : to force (someone) into exile

exile

noun
ex·ile | \ ˈeg-ˌzīl , ˈek-ˌsīl \

Kids Definition of exile

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the situation of a person who is forced to leave his or her own country He's living in exile.

2 : the period of time someone is forced to live away from his or her country a 20 year exile

3 : a person who is forced to leave his or her own country

exile

verb
exiled; exiling

Kids Definition of exile (Entry 2 of 2)

: to force (someone) to leave his or her own country

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Comments on exile

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