damn

1 of 3

verb

damned; damning ˈda-miŋ How to pronounce damn (audio)

transitive verb

1
: to condemn to a punishment or fate
especially : to condemn to hell
2
a
: to condemn vigorously and often irascibly for some real or fancied fault or defect
damned the storm for their delay
b
: to condemn as a failure by public criticism
3
: to bring ruin on
4
: to swear at : curse
often used to express annoyance, disgust, or surprise
damn him, he should have been carefulI'll be damned

damn

2 of 3

noun

1
: the utterance of the word damn as a curse
2
: a minimum amount or degree (as of care or consideration) : the least bit
don't give a damn

damn

3 of 3

adjective or adverb

: damned
a damn nuisance
ran damn fast
Phrases
damn well
: beyond doubt or question : certainly
knew damn well what would happen

Example Sentences

Verb But it is functional talk for the purpose of conveying information, not, as often in the case of Waugh, for entertaining his audience, humdrum veracity be damned. Robert Murray Davis, Commonweal, 5 June 2009 Congress demanded an immediate investigation and over the next year held dramatic hearings, launched a variety of inquests, and produced several pounds of reports that condemned FEMA. One report damned the agency as a dumping ground for political appointees … Christopher Cooper & Robert Block, Disaster, 2006 No American war has been more roundly damned than the Mexican. Within months after its outbreak Whigs and abolitionists accused Polk of plotting the ambush on the Rio Grande and misrepresenting the facts in order to stampede the nation into a war of conquest … Walter A. McDougall, Promised Land, Crusader State, 1997 He damned them for their stupidity. damned the car for once again breaking down Noun I don't want to hear about your problems—I just don't give a damn. See More
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
Some might think the difference between a record of 5-5 and 4-6 meager, no big deal, but desperation had cropped up all around the Cougars, and the focus that came with it was the breeze that freshened their outlook, damn the mediocre record. Gordon Monson, The Salt Lake Tribune, 7 Nov. 2022 Historically, women were respected for being craftwork artists, healers, and damn good cooks. Christian Allaire, Vogue, 21 Mar. 2022 So the leadership insists on zero COVID and damn the consequences. Michael Schuman, The Atlantic, 9 Sep. 2022 Then the scale will be huge, and nuclear weapons, then surely someone will use it, damn it. Mary Ilyushina, Anchorage Daily News, 21 Aug. 2022 Then the scale will be huge, and nuclear weapons, then surely someone will use it, damn it. Mary Ilyushina, Washington Post, 21 Aug. 2022 There are some disqualifying metrics—anything less than fawning praise will damn them; hatred for Mitch McConnell is strongly preferred. Alex Shephard, The New Republic, 2 Aug. 2022 Be big, run fast, jump high, do good around cones, and damn the game tape. Nick Canepacolumnist, San Diego Union-Tribune, 28 Apr. 2022 Both adore print and know their way around a logo—and damn if their joint show wasn’t the glammest event of the season as Naomi Campbell closed their Milan runway in Versace metal mesh, emblazoned with Fendi’s double-F’s. Nicole Phelps, Vogue, 23 Mar. 2022
Noun
So many damn unfit people saying hate speech is free speech. Steve Mollman, Fortune, 30 Oct. 2022 As Griffin noted earlier this month, Kmet’s combination of versatility and give-a-damn are opening his potential. Dan Wiederer, Chicago Tribune, 30 Aug. 2022 The rest of the team should be made up of people who don’t give a damn how it’s been done in the past. Bill Brady, Forbes, 1 July 2022 Strongmen typically don't give much of a damn about the feelings of their people and preside over governments that prohibit a free press and free assembly. Peter Bergen, CNN, 7 Apr. 2022 Displaying a characteristic damn-the-torpedoes spirit in the face of the omicron surge, Bon Jovi have announced dates for a North American tour beginning in April. Jem Aswad, Variety, 7 Jan. 2022 That should give anyone chills who gives a damn about clean sport, as job pressure is one of the clearest incentives to dope. Joe Lindsey, Outside Online, 28 Feb. 2015 The Valley is talent-rich, but nobody seems to give a damn about Sun Devils football anymore. Jeremy Cluff, The Arizona Republic, 12 Oct. 2022 Somebody who’s making the choices nobody else wants to make: a genuine, authentic person who don’t give a damn. Meaghan Garvey, Billboard, 7 Oct. 2022
Adjective or adverb
There are fights that involve axes, swords, guns, sometimes swords and guns at the same damn time, plus high-speed chases through city streets and across vast deserts on camels. Jon Blistein, Rolling Stone, 10 Nov. 2022 Ian Dickinson's sound design for Autograph is the stuff of true nightmares, a searing shriek that rends the proceedings, serving as a scene transition that makes audiences jump in their seats every damn time. Maureen Lee Lenker, EW.com, 7 Nov. 2022 But those damn wastrel Republicans keep putting their hands in the till. Teresa M. Hanafin, BostonGlobe.com, 5 Nov. 2022 Grammy Award winner Lizzo brought music, glamour, voluminous red tulle and emotion to TV’s biggest night and, honestly, it’s about damn time. Nardine Saad, Los Angeles Times, 13 Sep. 2022 Why: Alison Lou is celebrating a decade of creating decadent, thoughtfully crafted, and damn fun jewelry. Claire Stern, ELLE, 8 Nov. 2022 It’s time for McKee and Infante-Green to release the damn test scores, no matter how painful the results are. Globe Columnist, BostonGlobe.com, 17 Oct. 2022 Willow took the the SNL stage like a damn pro — glaring, belting, screaming in her platform Converse and feline black eyeliner. Sarah Grant, Rolling Stone, 9 Oct. 2022 Who needs to be a damn billionaire when people are starving? Scott Huver, Peoplemag, 6 Oct. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'damn.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Verb, Noun, and Adjective or adverb

Middle English dampnen, from Anglo-French dampner, from Latin damnare, from damnum damage, loss, fine

First Known Use

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

1619, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective Or Adverb

1775, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of damn was in the 13th century

Dictionary Entries Near damn

Cite this Entry

“Damn.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/damn. Accessed 2 Dec. 2022.

Kids Definition

damn 1 of 2

verb

1
: to condemn to a punishment or fate
especially : to condemn to hell
2
: to condemn as bad or as a failure
3
: to swear at : curse

damn

2 of 2

noun

1
: the saying of the word damn as a curse
2
: the least bit
not worth a damn
Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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