crop

1 of 2

noun

1
: a pouched enlargement of the esophagus of many birds that serves as a receptacle for food and for its preliminary maceration
also : an enlargement of the digestive tract of another animal (such as an insect)
2
a(1)
: a plant or animal or plant or animal product that can be grown and harvested extensively for profit or subsistence
an apple crop
a crop of wool
(2)
: the total yearly production from a specified area
b
: the product or yield of something formed together
the ice crop
c
: a batch or lot of something produced during a particular cycle
the current crop of films
d
: collection
a crop of lies
3
: the stock or handle of a whip
also : a riding whip with a short straight stock and a loop
4
a
: the part of the chine of a quadruped (such as a domestic cow) lying immediately behind the withers
usually used in plural
see cow illustration
b
: an earmark on an animal
especially : one made by a straight cut squarely removing the upper part of the ear
c
: a close cut of the hair
He has a thick crop of hair.

crop

2 of 2

verb

cropped; cropping

transitive verb

1
a
: to remove the upper or outer parts of
crop a hedge
crop a dog's ears
b
: harvest
crop trout
c
: to cut off short : trim
crop a photograph
2
: to cause (land) to bear a crop
planned to crop another 40 acres
also : to grow as a crop

intransitive verb

1
: to feed by cropping something
2
: to yield or make a crop
3
: to appear unexpectedly or casually
Problems crop up daily.

Examples of crop in a Sentence

Noun Tobacco is their main crop. They sprayed the crops with a pesticide. The teachers got ready for a new crop of students. a new crop of horror movies Verb The picture was cropped badly. We had to crop the image to fit it into the frame. Her hair was cropped short. See More
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
This year, The Star will highlight the next crop of talented players. Jaylon Thompson, Kansas City Star, 22 Feb. 2024 What are the clues for the new crop of masked celebrities? Lauren Huff, EW.com, 21 Feb. 2024 Spring is just around the corner (as unbelievable as that may feel to those of us dealing with East Coast snow, West Coast rain, and everything in between), and luckily enough, the advent of March means a whole new crop of TV and movie offerings about to hit Netflix. Emma Specter, Vogue, 21 Feb. 2024 Currently, the government protects agricultural producers against any sharp fall in farm prices by setting a minimum purchase price for certain essential crops, a system that was introduced in the 1960s to help shore up food reserves and prevent shortages. Krutika Pathi, The Christian Science Monitor, 16 Feb. 2024 The town of not quite 13,000 residents, which sits in between Phoenix and Scottsdale, has specifically attracted a crop of West Coast transplants, mainly from Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Seattle. Abby Montanez, Robb Report, 14 Feb. 2024 This year’s list is a crop of companies that are proving themselves in the face of new technology and a difficult economic climate, helping CFOs, financial institutions, investors and ordinary consumers alike be able to manage their funds. Megan Poinski, Forbes, 13 Feb. 2024 Ensuring affordable nourishment for growing populations is critical as climate change hits crops, war hampers access to export routes and countries put up trade barriers. Nayla Razzouk, Fortune Europe, 13 Feb. 2024 Crop Over’s summer fete is tied to when enslaved people celebrated the end of sugarcane season or the crop was over. Kristin Braswell, Travel + Leisure, 10 Feb. 2024
Verb
Her designs for this show were equally eclectic: leather coats, both long and cropped, hoodies under long wool coats, and gowns worn over trousers. Joanne Shurvell, Forbes, 21 Feb. 2024 In 1962, Air France worked with Christian Dior's then artistic director Marc Bohan to create a modern uniform featuring pillbox hats and cropped jackets with Claudine collars. Caitlin Gunther, Condé Nast Traveler, 14 Feb. 2024 There were a lot of toned, cropped moments that just served the look…. Stephanie McNeal, Glamour, 2 Feb. 2024 The puppy's ears had been cropped, supposedly by a veterinarian, and had stitches, Randazzo said. Christina Hall, Detroit Free Press, 25 Jan. 2024 Visible watermarks can be easily cropped or edited out. Gerrit De Vynck, Washington Post, 15 Jan. 2024 They’re cropped to the ankle with raw edges to complete the mood—and offer endless shoe styling possibilities. Paula Lee, Glamour, 9 Feb. 2024 If a reporter were to crop a photo that was previously edified using Photoshop, for example, both of those changes to the images would be noted in the final manifest. Popular Science, 8 Feb. 2024 In many cases, portions of images are magnified and cropped to provide a detailed view of key features. John Timmer, Ars Technica, 4 Jan. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'crop.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

(senses 1-3) Middle English crop, crope, croppe "crop of a bird, portion of an herb above the root, sprig, bud, crown of a tree, harvest of a plant, tip or top of something," going back to Old English crop "crop of a bird, sprout, shoot, bunch or cluster (of fruit, seeds), umbel (also croppa, weak noun, only in sense "bunch, cluster"), going back to Germanic *kruppa- "something rounded, bulge," (whence also Old Saxon kripp "crop of a bird," Middle Dutch crop "gnarl, goiter, gullet, body, corpse, blister, bud," Old High German kropf "protuberance, goiter, crop of a bird," Old Icelandic kroppr "swelling on the body, crop of a bird" [Icelandic & Faroese kroppur "body"]), of expressive origin; (sense 4) derivatives of crop entry 2

Note: The Old English n-stem croppa is matched by Old High German kropfo "crop of a bird, bulbous onion." Old Icelandic krov "slaughtered animal with the entrails removed" points to an original paradigm *kruƀan- : *kruƀn-, with the latter resulting in *kruppa- by loss of the nasal, devoicing, and gemination (Kluge's Law). The early meaning of the etymon and its later semantic bifurcations are difficult to reconstruct with certainty. An original sense "something rounded, bulge, swelling" may have led, on the one hand, to "cavity in a slaughtered animal after the entrails are removed" and hence "body, corpse" (meanings in North Germanic and Middle Dutch), and on the other to "swelling in the throat, crop of a bird, goiter." The sense "sprout, bud" in West Germanic is a further specification of "swelling." The later development in English is not paralleled in the other languages. The sense "sprout, sprig" seems to have been generalized to "structures terminating a plant, as fruit, seeds, umbels" and then, on the one hand, to "upper part, tip or end of an object" (such as the stock of a whip) and, on the other hand, to "harvested fruit of a plant, yield of such harvested products in a season." Compare croup entry 1, group entry 1. See R. Lühr, Expressivität und Lautgesetz im Germanischen, Heidelberg, 1988, p. 235; R. Lühr et al., Etymologisches Wörterbuch des Althochdeutschen, Band 5 [2014], columns 816-18; G. Kroonen, Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic, Brill, 2013, p. 307.

Verb

Middle English croppen "to prune, trim, cut branches from (a bush or tree), derivative of crop, crope, croppe "sprig, bud, crown of a tree, tip or top of something" — more at crop entry 1

Note: The phrasal verb crop up is dependent on a geological sense of crop, "(of rock strata) to appear at the surface," a coal miners' term in the West Midlands in the seventeenth century, which is apparently a development of the noun sense "tip, end" ("to show itself at the exposed end"). Compare outcrop entry 1.

First Known Use

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Time Traveler
The first known use of crop was before the 12th century

Dictionary Entries Near crop

Cite this Entry

“Crop.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/crop. Accessed 29 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

crop

1 of 2 noun
1
a
: the handle of a whip
b
: a short riding whip
2
: an enlargement of the gullet of a bird or insect that forms a pouch to receive food and prepare it for digestion
3
a
: a plant or animal or plant or animal product that can be grown and harvested
b
: the product or yield especially of a harvested crop
c
: batch sense 2, lot
a new crop of kindergartners

crop

2 of 2 verb
cropped; cropping
1
a
: to remove the upper or outer parts of
crop a hedge
crop a dog's ears
b
: to cut off short : clip
crop a photograph
2
a
: to cause land to bear a crop
b
: to grow as a crop
crop cotton
3
: to produce or make a crop
the apple trees cropped well
4
: to come or appear when not expected
problems crop up daily

Medical Definition

crop

noun
: a pouched enlargement of the gullet of many birds that serves as a receptacle for food and for its preliminary maceration

More from Merriam-Webster on crop

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