concur

verb
con·​cur | \ kən-ˈkər How to pronounce concur (audio) , kän- \
concurred; concurring

Definition of concur

intransitive verb

1a : to express agreement concur with an opinion
b : approve concur in a statement
2 : to act together to a common end or single effect
3 : to happen together : coincide
4 obsolete : to come together : meet

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Synonyms & Antonyms for concur

Synonyms

Antonyms

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Choose the Right Synonym for concur

agree, concur, coincide mean to come into or be in harmony regarding a matter of opinion. agree implies complete accord usually attained by discussion and adjustment of differences. on some points we all can agree concur often implies approval of someone else's statement or decision. if my wife concurs, it's a deal coincide, used more often of opinions, judgments, wishes, or interests than of people, implies total agreement. their wishes coincide exactly with my desire

Examples of concur in a Sentence

In Washington, Robert B. Zoellick, president of the World Bank, concurs that only a multinational solution can really work. — Peter Gumbel, Time, 20 Oct. 2008 "I'm fine for money, Dmitri," he responded casually. "My needs are very simple." "Yes," the Soviet concurred, a tinge of mystery in his voice, "you seem to lack for nothing … " — Erich Segal, The Class, (1985) 1986 For New York, to Mrs. Archer's mind, never changed without changing for the worse; and in this view Miss Sophy Jackson heartily concurred. — Edith Wharton, The Age of Innocence, 1920 We concur that more money should be spent on education. “I think more time is needed.” “I concur.”
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Recent Examples on the Web Today most physicists concur that inanimate objects can knock quantum systems out of superposition through a process known as decoherence. Zeeya Merali, Scientific American, "This Twist on Schrödinger’s Cat Paradox Has Major Implications for Quantum Theory," 17 Aug. 2020 The state's lawmakers did receive a $1,600 pay raise last year after the House chose not to concur with a Senate action to prevent the increase. Ella Lee, USA TODAY, "Fact check: Illinois governor didn't scheme to give 'politician buddies' raises amid pandemic," 1 Aug. 2020 Connie Helms, an education consultant in Monkton, Vermont, would concur. Jennifer G. Wolcott, The Christian Science Monitor, "In a pandemic summer, picnicking ‘nurtures the soul’," 1 July 2020 Independent Police Review, protesters and sympathetic onlookers concur that the actions of protesters elicit a disproportionate reaction from police. oregonlive, "Portland’s Justice Center fence: A daunting place after dark for both protesters and police," 28 June 2020 Members of the Senate applauded after the final vote to concur with the House version, 47-0, was announced. Washington Examiner, "North Carolina Senate passes bills to reform criminal justice system," 17 June 2020 For cases worth between $5,000 and $35,000, the bill calls for a six-person jury in which five jurors must concur to reach a verdict. Washington Examiner, "Louisiana House votes again to change how courts handle auto accident claims," 16 June 2020 City Recreation Director Tim Pinchek concurred with the mayor’s announcement. Linda Gandee, cleveland, "Summer swimming dreams postponed in Avon Lake; rec department has summer options," 30 May 2020 DeRoche cited a 1992 concurring opinion by Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia in the desegregation case. Jay Mathews, Washington Post, "Why access to great schools shouldn’t take great wealth," 17 May 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'concur.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of concur

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for concur

Middle English concurren "to operate in concert, agree," borrowed from Latin concurrere "to assemble in haste, resort to in large numbers, collide, exist simultaneously, be in agreement," from con- con- + currere "to run, flow" — more at current entry 1

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Time Traveler for concur

Time Traveler

The first known use of concur was in the 15th century

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Statistics for concur

Last Updated

22 Aug 2020

Cite this Entry

“Concur.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/concur. Accessed 25 Sep. 2020.

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More Definitions for concur

concur

verb
How to pronounce concur (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of concur

formal : to agree with someone or something

concur

verb
con·​cur | \ kən-ˈkər How to pronounce concur (audio) \
concurred; concurring

Kids Definition of concur

1 : to act or happen together … those measures of life, which nature and Providence concurred to present me with …— Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe
2 : to be in agreement (as in action or opinion) : accord The two judges concurred.
con·​cur | \ kən-ˈkər How to pronounce concur (audio) \
concurred; concurring

Legal Definition of concur

1 : to happen at the same time
2 : to express agreement he shall have power…to make treaties, provided two-thirds of the Senators present concurU.S. Constitution art. II specifically : to join in an appellate decision — compare dissent

Note: A judge or justice may concur with the decision of the court but not agree with the reasons set forth in the opinion. Often a separate opinion is written in such a case.

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