concurrence

noun

con·​cur·​rence kən-ˈkər-ən(t)s How to pronounce concurrence (audio)
-ˈkə-rən(t)s,
kän-
1
a
: agreement or union in action : cooperation
b(1)
: agreement in opinion or design
(2)
: consent
obtained the written concurrence of the attorney general
2
: a coincidence of equal powers in law
3
a
: the simultaneous occurrence of events or circumstances
The concurrence of heavy rain and strong winds delayed the plane's departure.
b
: the meeting of concurrent lines in a point

Examples of concurrence in a Sentence

the concurrence of my birthday and the concert by my favorite band made my preference for a birthday present pretty obvious looked for some sign of concurrence among the delegates to the conference
Recent Examples on the Web Key dates for the rest of the legislative session March 27 & 28: Deadline for concurrence, when House bills must get the agreement of the Senate and vice versa in order to pass March 29 - April 9: Veto period. Rebecca Grapevine, The Courier-Journal, 26 Mar. 2024 Barrett, despite sharing the liberals’ reservations about Congress’s power, offers what reads as an admonishment of their concurrence. Amy Davidson Sorkin, The New Yorker, 4 Mar. 2024 The first line of the concurrence appeared to be intended to needle Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., who was probably a principal author of the unsigned majority opinion. Adam Liptak, New York Times, 4 Mar. 2024 The 31-10 Senate vote sends the bill back to the House for concurrence on amendments. Morgan Lee, Quartz, 13 Feb. 2024 The three liberal Justices reportedly square-pegged a partial dissent into a bitter, for-the-good-of-the-country concurrence with the six conservatives, to reverse the lower court. Jill Lepore, The New Yorker, 10 Mar. 2024 In 2019, the First District Appellate Court upheld a Contra Costa conviction where the prosecutor dismissed every Black person from the jury pool, even though one of the justices wrote in a fiery concurrence that the case demonstrated the need for legislative changes. Nate Gartrell, The Mercury News, 4 Mar. 2024 Parker’s concurrence would likely not exist without the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in the 2022 case of Kennedy v. Bremerton. Noah Feldman, Twin Cities, 23 Feb. 2024 The Justices would circulate draft opinions, concurrences, and dissents, trying to get one another to sign on. E. Tammy Kim, The New Yorker, 7 Feb. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'concurrence.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English, "concentration," borrowed from Medieval Latin concurrentia "coming together, simultaneous occurrence," noun derivative of Latin concurrent-, concurrens "running together, concurrent"

First Known Use

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 3a

Time Traveler
The first known use of concurrence was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near concurrence

Cite this Entry

“Concurrence.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/concurrence. Accessed 20 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

concurrence

noun
con·​cur·​rence kən-ˈkər-ən(t)s How to pronounce concurrence (audio)
-ˈkə-rən(t)s,
kän-
1
: agreement in action, opinion, or intent : cooperation
2
3
: a coming together : conjunction

Legal Definition

concurrence

noun
con·​cur·​rence kən-ˈkər-əns How to pronounce concurrence (audio)
1
: the simultaneous occurrence of events or circumstances
2
: an agreement in judgment
specifically : a judge's or justice's separate opinion that differs in reasoning but agrees in the decision of the court
Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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