conjunction

noun
con·​junc·​tion | \ kən-ˈjəŋ(k)-shən How to pronounce conjunction (audio) \

Definition of conjunction

1 : an uninflected linguistic form that joins together sentences, clauses, phrases, or words Some common conjunctions are "and," "but," and "although."
2 : the act or an instance of conjoining : the state of being conjoined : combination working in conjunction with state and local authorities
3 : occurrence together in time or space : concurrence a conjunction of events
4a : the apparent meeting or passing of two or more celestial bodies in the same degree of the zodiac
b : a configuration in which two celestial bodies have their least apparent separation a conjunction of Mars and Jupiter
5 : a complex sentence in logic true if and only if each of its components is true — see Truth Table

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Other Words from conjunction

conjunctional \ kən-​ˈjəŋ(k)-​shnəl How to pronounce conjunctional (audio) , -​shə-​nᵊl \ adjective
conjunctionally adverb

Synonyms & Antonyms for conjunction

Synonyms

confluence, convergence, convergency, meeting

Antonyms

divergence

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What is a conjunction?

Conjunctions are words that join together other words or groups of words.

A coordinating conjunction connects words, phrases, and clauses of equal importance. The main coordinating conjunctions are and, or, and but.

They bought apples, pears, and oranges.

You can wait either on the steps or in the car.

The paintings are pleasant but bland.

When placed at the beginning of a sentence, a coordinating conjunction may also link two sentences or paragraphs.

The preparations were complete. But where were the guests?

She told him that he would have to work to earn her trust. And he proceeded to do just that.

A subordinating conjunction introduces a subordinate clause (a clause that does not form a simple sentence by itself) and joins it to a main clause (a clause that can be used as a simple sentence by itself).

She waited until they were seated.

It had been quiet since the children left.

Some conjunctions are used in pairs. The most common pairs are either ... or, both ... and, neither ... nor, and not only ... but (also).

They could either continue searching or go to the police.

Both Clara and Jeanette graduated from Stanford.

He could neither sing nor dance.

Not only the money but also the jewelry had been found.

Some adverbs, such as afterwards, consequently, for example, however, nonetheless, and therefore, act like conjunctions by linking either two main clauses separated by a semicolon, or two separate sentences. They express some effect that the first clause or sentence has on the second one.

They didn't agree; however, each understood the other's opinion.

We'll probably regret it; still, we really have no choice.

The team has won its last three games. Thus, its record for the year is now 15-12.

Examples of conjunction in a Sentence

Some common conjunctions are “and,” “but,” and “although.” the conjunction of the two major highways creates a massive influx of cars into the city

Recent Examples on the Web

Other times, an image of her will pop up on my Instagram feed, usually in conjunction with some Kim Kardashian West kontent. Vogue, "Is Kourtney Actually the Best Dressed Kardashian Sister?," 18 Apr. 2019 The league says Foster acknowledged responsibility for his actions and has committed to a comprehensive accountability plan developed in conjunction with the NFLPA and the Redskins to avoid future incidents. Stephen Whyno, The Seattle Times, "Redskins’ Foster fined, not suspended, after NFL review," 13 Apr. 2019 Will WebAuthn work in conjunction with existing 2FA methods? Mark Hachman, PCWorld, "WebAuthn: What you need to know about the future of the passwordless Web," 7 Mar. 2019 In conjunction with the concession, DP World had owned 33% of the port venture, with the government holding the rest. Costas Paris, WSJ, "China Tightens Grip on East African Port," 21 Feb. 2019 These can happen in conjunction with individual therapy or potentially as a standalone. Carolyn L. Todd, SELF, "7 Ways to Find an Actually Affordable Therapist," 15 Feb. 2019 This project suggests pairing humans with machines to crowdsource keywords for works of art that the Met archives, and then using those keywords in conjunction with the Wikimedia platforms to suggest related art when those keywords are called up. Mark Hachman, PCWorld, "Microsoft uses AI to bring the Met's art collection to the web—and your Instagram," 4 Feb. 2019 Sinclair Broadcasting, in conjunction with CVC Capital Partners, has reportedly made the only serious — but lowball — bid for all 22 networks. Recode Staff, Recode, "Recode Daily: Here’s what Google CEO Sundar Pichai explained to Congress," 12 Dec. 2018 Increasingly, doctors may prescribe antipsychotic drugs such as aripiprazole (Abilify) and olanzapine (Zyprexa) in conjunction with antidepressants, especially when a person’s depression is either severe or not responding to typical medications. Kasandra Brabaw, SELF, "7 Myths You Might Believe About Antipsychotic Medications," 7 Dec. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'conjunction.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of conjunction

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for conjunction

see conjunct entry 1

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More Definitions for conjunction

conjunction

noun

English Language Learners Definition of conjunction

grammar : a word that joins together sentences, clauses, phrases, or words
formal : a situation in which two or more things happen at the same time or in the same place

conjunction

noun
con·​junc·​tion | \ kən-ˈjəŋk-shən How to pronounce conjunction (audio) \

Kids Definition of conjunction

1 : a joining together : union
2 : a word or expression that joins together sentences, clauses, phrases, or words

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Comments on conjunction

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