conjunction

noun
con·​junc·​tion | \ kən-ˈjəŋ(k)-shən How to pronounce conjunction (audio) \

Definition of conjunction

1 : an uninflected linguistic form that joins together sentences, clauses, phrases, or words Some common conjunctions are "and," "but," and "although."
2 : the act or an instance of conjoining : the state of being conjoined : combination working in conjunction with state and local authorities
3 : occurrence together in time or space : concurrence a conjunction of events
4a : the apparent meeting or passing of two or more celestial bodies in the same degree of the zodiac
b : a configuration in which two celestial bodies have their least apparent separation a conjunction of Mars and Jupiter
5 : a complex sentence in logic true if and only if each of its components is true — see Truth Table

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Other Words from conjunction

conjunctional \ kən-​ˈjəŋ(k)-​shnəl How to pronounce conjunction (audio) , -​shə-​nᵊl \ adjective
conjunctionally adverb

Synonyms & Antonyms for conjunction

Synonyms

Antonyms

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What is a conjunction?

Conjunctions are words that join together other words or groups of words.

A coordinating conjunction connects words, phrases, and clauses of equal importance. The main coordinating conjunctions are and, or, and but.

They bought apples, pears, and oranges.

You can wait either on the steps or in the car.

The paintings are pleasant but bland.

When placed at the beginning of a sentence, a coordinating conjunction may also link two sentences or paragraphs.

The preparations were complete. But where were the guests?

She told him that he would have to work to earn her trust. And he proceeded to do just that.

A subordinating conjunction introduces a subordinate clause (a clause that does not form a simple sentence by itself) and joins it to a main clause (a clause that can be used as a simple sentence by itself).

She waited until they were seated.

It had been quiet since the children left.

Some conjunctions are used in pairs. The most common pairs are either ... or, both ... and, neither ... nor, and not only ... but (also).

They could either continue searching or go to the police.

Both Clara and Jeanette graduated from Stanford.

He could neither sing nor dance.

Not only the money but also the jewelry had been found.

Some adverbs, such as afterwards, consequently, for example, however, nonetheless, and therefore, act like conjunctions by linking either two main clauses separated by a semicolon, or two separate sentences. They express some effect that the first clause or sentence has on the second one.

They didn't agree; however, each understood the other's opinion.

We'll probably regret it; still, we really have no choice.

The team has won its last three games. Thus, its record for the year is now 15-12.

Examples of conjunction in a Sentence

Some common conjunctions are “and,” “but,” and “although.” the conjunction of the two major highways creates a massive influx of cars into the city
Recent Examples on the Web Educators can receive free admission to Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex between May 3 and May 16 in conjunction with Educator Appreciation Week. Dewayne Bevil, orlandosentinel.com, "Kennedy Space Center: Free ticket offer for educators," 30 Apr. 2021 In addition to his visiting fellowship at the Heritage Foundation, Pence will launch a podcast in September in conjunction with the Young America's Foundation, a conservative youth organization. Michael Warren, CNN, "Pence reemerges in South Carolina as he weighs 2024 bid and navigates relationship with Trump," 29 Apr. 2021 The Encore Boston Harbor casino has started offering vaccinations by appointment only to employees and the general public in conjunction with a local health care organization. From Usa Today Network And Wire Reports, USA TODAY, "Firefly lottery, vaccine exemptions, data breach: News from around our 50 states," 29 Apr. 2021 But Oregon was among one of the last states in the nation to open vaccines to everyone 16 and over, moving the date to April 19 in conjunction with a deadline set by President Joseph Biden. oregonlive, "Oregon governor extends COVID-19 emergency, hints it could be lifted this summer," 29 Apr. 2021 This is radically different from the House of Representatives, where the speaker of the House works in conjunction with the majority leader and the Rules Committee to limit sharply who can say what on the floor. Jay Cost, Washington Examiner, "Democrats' threat to blow up Congress," 29 Apr. 2021 Specifically, this conjunction will illuminate our need for freedom and space within relationships. Elizabeth Gulino, refinery29.com, "What Is A Venus Star Point? So Glad You Asked," 25 Mar. 2021 The Southern Hemisphere enjoys the big advantage for viewing this spectacularly-close conjunction, and northerly latitudes may well miss out altogether (even if using an optical aid). Todd Nelson, Star Tribune, "This Weekend is Peak Winter Nationwide," 12 Feb. 2021 That conjunction was almost impossible to see, however, because of its closeness to the sun. Arkansas Online, "PHOTOS: Jupiter and Saturn's great conjunction," 22 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'conjunction.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of conjunction

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for conjunction

see conjunct entry 1

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Time Traveler for conjunction

Time Traveler

The first known use of conjunction was in the 14th century

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Statistics for conjunction

Last Updated

3 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Conjunction.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/conjunction. Accessed 15 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for conjunction

conjunction

noun

English Language Learners Definition of conjunction

grammar : a word that joins together sentences, clauses, phrases, or words
formal : a situation in which two or more things happen at the same time or in the same place

conjunction

noun
con·​junc·​tion | \ kən-ˈjəŋk-shən How to pronounce conjunction (audio) \

Kids Definition of conjunction

1 : a joining together : union
2 : a word or expression that joins together sentences, clauses, phrases, or words

Comments on conjunction

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