conjunction

noun
con·​junc·​tion | \ kən-ˈjəŋ(k)-shən How to pronounce conjunction (audio) \

Definition of conjunction

1 : an uninflected linguistic form that joins together sentences, clauses, phrases, or words Some common conjunctions are "and," "but," and "although."
2 : the act or an instance of conjoining : the state of being conjoined : combination working in conjunction with state and local authorities
3 : occurrence together in time or space : concurrence a conjunction of events
4a : the apparent meeting or passing of two or more celestial bodies in the same degree of the zodiac
b : a configuration in which two celestial bodies have their least apparent separation a conjunction of Mars and Jupiter
5 : a complex sentence in logic true if and only if each of its components is true — see Truth Table

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Other Words from conjunction

conjunctional \ kən-​ˈjəŋ(k)-​shnəl How to pronounce conjunction (audio) , -​shə-​nᵊl \ adjective
conjunctionally adverb

Synonyms & Antonyms for conjunction

Synonyms

Antonyms

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What is a conjunction?

Conjunctions are words that join together other words or groups of words.

A coordinating conjunction connects words, phrases, and clauses of equal importance. The main coordinating conjunctions are and, or, and but.

They bought apples, pears, and oranges.

You can wait either on the steps or in the car.

The paintings are pleasant but bland.

When placed at the beginning of a sentence, a coordinating conjunction may also link two sentences or paragraphs.

The preparations were complete. But where were the guests?

She told him that he would have to work to earn her trust. And he proceeded to do just that.

A subordinating conjunction introduces a subordinate clause (a clause that does not form a simple sentence by itself) and joins it to a main clause (a clause that can be used as a simple sentence by itself).

She waited until they were seated.

It had been quiet since the children left.

Some conjunctions are used in pairs. The most common pairs are either ... or, both ... and, neither ... nor, and not only ... but (also).

They could either continue searching or go to the police.

Both Clara and Jeanette graduated from Stanford.

He could neither sing nor dance.

Not only the money but also the jewelry had been found.

Some adverbs, such as afterwards, consequently, for example, however, nonetheless, and therefore, act like conjunctions by linking either two main clauses separated by a semicolon, or two separate sentences. They express some effect that the first clause or sentence has on the second one.

They didn't agree; however, each understood the other's opinion.

We'll probably regret it; still, we really have no choice.

The team has won its last three games. Thus, its record for the year is now 15-12.

Examples of conjunction in a Sentence

Some common conjunctions are “and,” “but,” and “although.” the conjunction of the two major highways creates a massive influx of cars into the city
Recent Examples on the Web Aftershave, like every one of Blu Atlas’ products, is dermatologically tested for safety and efficacy, and contains no active ingredients - meaning that it can in most cases be safely used in conjunction with other skincare products and medications. The Salt Lake Tribune, 12 May 2022 Under Armour, in conjunction with Corrigan Sports Enterprises and Inside Lacrosse, announced the second wave of seniors who have been selected to compete in the Under Armour All-America Lacrosse Games, including three Baltimore-area girls. Glenn Graham, Baltimore Sun, 10 May 2022 Lastly, in conjunction with the Arab Cinema Centre and MAD Solutions (Egypt), IEFTA will co-host a cocktail reception May 22 at the Carlton Beach Club to celebrate the work of UNHCR. Tim Gray, Variety, 10 May 2022 But even in cases where U.S. authorities know their identities, few of them have ever been arrested in conjunction with American law enforcement efforts. Kevin Collier, NBC News, 9 May 2022 The new participation from the private sector, in conjunction with the ACP subsidy covering up to $30 a month (or $75 a month on Tribal lands), essentially makes the program free. Libby Cathey, ABC News, 9 May 2022 Inauthentic accounts are used for malicious purposes beyond spam and are hard to detect, especially when they are operated by people in conjunction with software algorithms. Filippo Menczer, The Conversation, 9 May 2022 In conjunction with what has leaked about the iPhone 14 range, absolutely. Gordon Kelly, Forbes, 7 May 2022 The rising rapper, who just released his new album Come Home the Kids Miss You, sat down with Zane Lowe on Apple Music 1 in conjunction with its debut to talk music, fame, money and many other subjects including his forthcoming movie debut. Chris Gardner, The Hollywood Reporter, 6 May 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'conjunction.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of conjunction

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for conjunction

see conjunct entry 1

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Time Traveler for conjunction

Time Traveler

The first known use of conjunction was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near conjunction

conjunct

conjunction

conjunctiva

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Statistics for conjunction

Last Updated

15 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Conjunction.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/conjunction. Accessed 26 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for conjunction

conjunction

noun
con·​junc·​tion | \ kən-ˈjəŋk-shən How to pronounce conjunction (audio) \

Kids Definition of conjunction

1 : a joining together : union
2 : a word or expression that joins together sentences, clauses, phrases, or words

More from Merriam-Webster on conjunction

Nglish: Translation of conjunction for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of conjunction for Arabic Speakers

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