conjunction

noun
con·​junc·​tion | \ kən-ˈjəŋ(k)-shən \

Definition of conjunction

1 : an uninflected linguistic form that joins together sentences, clauses, phrases, or words Some common conjunctions are "and," "but," and "although."
2 : the act or an instance of conjoining : the state of being conjoined : combination working in conjunction with state and local authorities
3 : occurrence together in time or space : concurrence a conjunction of events
4a : the apparent meeting or passing of two or more celestial bodies in the same degree of the zodiac
b : a configuration in which two celestial bodies have their least apparent separation a conjunction of Mars and Jupiter
5 : a complex sentence in logic true if and only if each of its components is true — see Truth Table

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Other Words from conjunction

conjunctional \ kən-​ˈjəŋ(k)-​shnəl , -​shə-​nᵊl \ adjective
conjunctionally adverb

Synonyms & Antonyms for conjunction

Synonyms

confluence, convergence, convergency, meeting

Antonyms

divergence

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What is a conjunction?

Conjunctions are words that join together other words or groups of words.

A coordinating conjunction connects words, phrases, and clauses of equal importance. The main coordinating conjunctions are and, or, and but.

They bought apples, pears, and oranges.

You can wait either on the steps or in the car.

The paintings are pleasant but bland.

When placed at the beginning of a sentence, a coordinating conjunction may also link two sentences or paragraphs.

The preparations were complete. But where were the guests?

She told him that he would have to work to earn her trust. And he proceeded to do just that.

A subordinating conjunction introduces a subordinate clause (a clause that does not form a simple sentence by itself) and joins it to a main clause (a clause that can be used as a simple sentence by itself).

She waited until they were seated.

It had been quiet since the children left.

Some conjunctions are used in pairs. The most common pairs are either ... or, both ... and, neither ... nor, and not only ... but (also).

They could either continue searching or go to the police.

Both Clara and Jeanette graduated from Stanford.

He could neither sing nor dance.

Not only the money but also the jewelry had been found.

Some adverbs, such as afterwards, consequently, for example, however, nonetheless, and therefore, act like conjunctions by linking either two main clauses separated by a semicolon, or two separate sentences. They express some effect that the first clause or sentence has on the second one.

They didn't agree; however, each understood the other's opinion.

We'll probably regret it; still, we really have no choice.

The team has won its last three games. Thus, its record for the year is now 15-12.

Examples of conjunction in a Sentence

Some common conjunctions are “and,” “but,” and “although.” the conjunction of the two major highways creates a massive influx of cars into the city

Recent Examples on the Web

Sinclair Broadcasting, in conjunction with CVC Capital Partners, has reportedly made the only serious — but lowball — bid for all 22 networks. Recode Staff, Recode, "Recode Daily: Here’s what Google CEO Sundar Pichai explained to Congress," 12 Dec. 2018 Increasingly, doctors may prescribe antipsychotic drugs such as aripiprazole (Abilify) and olanzapine (Zyprexa) in conjunction with antidepressants, especially when a person’s depression is either severe or not responding to typical medications. Kasandra Brabaw, SELF, "7 Myths You Might Believe About Antipsychotic Medications," 7 Dec. 2018 The nonprofit watchdog’s report, published in conjunction with brokerage firm CLSA, faults Japanese regulators for not doing enough to improve minority shareholders’ rights. Mike Bird, WSJ, "Japan’s Crusade for Corporate Overhaul Under Threat, Watchdog Says," 5 Dec. 2018 The first of these posts was published in conjunction with the announcement of the re-release of the October 2018 Update. Mark Hachman, PCWorld, "Microsoft re-releases the Windows 10 October 2018 Update, admitting its testing needs to improve," 13 Nov. 2018 What’s more, district lines are only drawn once a decade, in conjunction with the census, so there aren’t many opportunities to reverse them. Sean Illing, Vox, "What the 2018 midterms mean for the Democrats’ gerrymandering dilemma," 7 Nov. 2018 Eating these foods in conjunction with fats and protein (so, an apple with a smear of peanut butter) can also help lessen symptoms of bloat. Colleen Stinchcombe, Woman's Day, "Why Am I Always Bloated?," 29 Oct. 2018 Just remember that each of them absolutely needs to be used in conjunction with daily sunscreen, or your melasma will get worse. Chloe Metzger, Marie Claire, "Those Weird Spots on Your Face Could Actually Be Melasma," 27 Sep. 2018 The screening is being presented with Community + Public Arts: Detroit, a program of the College of Creative Studies, in conjunction with North End residents and community groups. Detroit Free Press, "For the 51st anniversary of rebellion, a free screening of '12th and Clairmount'," 13 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'conjunction.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of conjunction

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for conjunction

see conjunct entry 1

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Last Updated

15 Dec 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for conjunction

The first known use of conjunction was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for conjunction

conjunction

noun

English Language Learners Definition of conjunction

grammar : a word that joins together sentences, clauses, phrases, or words

: a situation in which two or more things happen at the same time or in the same place

conjunction

noun
con·​junc·​tion | \ kən-ˈjəŋk-shən \

Kids Definition of conjunction

1 : a joining together : union
2 : a word or expression that joins together sentences, clauses, phrases, or words

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Comments on conjunction

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tremendous in size, volume, or degree

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