conjunction

noun
con·​junc·​tion | \ kən-ˈjəŋ(k)-shən How to pronounce conjunction (audio) \

Definition of conjunction

1 : an uninflected linguistic form that joins together sentences, clauses, phrases, or words Some common conjunctions are "and," "but," and "although."
2 : the act or an instance of conjoining : the state of being conjoined : combination working in conjunction with state and local authorities
3 : occurrence together in time or space : concurrence a conjunction of events
4a : the apparent meeting or passing of two or more celestial bodies in the same degree of the zodiac
b : a configuration in which two celestial bodies have their least apparent separation a conjunction of Mars and Jupiter
5 : a complex sentence in logic true if and only if each of its components is true — see Truth Table

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Other Words from conjunction

conjunctional \ kən-​ˈjəŋ(k)-​shnəl How to pronounce conjunctional (audio) , -​shə-​nᵊl \ adjective
conjunctionally adverb

Synonyms & Antonyms for conjunction

Synonyms

Antonyms

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What is a conjunction?

Conjunctions are words that join together other words or groups of words.

A coordinating conjunction connects words, phrases, and clauses of equal importance. The main coordinating conjunctions are and, or, and but.

They bought apples, pears, and oranges.

You can wait either on the steps or in the car.

The paintings are pleasant but bland.

When placed at the beginning of a sentence, a coordinating conjunction may also link two sentences or paragraphs.

The preparations were complete. But where were the guests?

She told him that he would have to work to earn her trust. And he proceeded to do just that.

A subordinating conjunction introduces a subordinate clause (a clause that does not form a simple sentence by itself) and joins it to a main clause (a clause that can be used as a simple sentence by itself).

She waited until they were seated.

It had been quiet since the children left.

Some conjunctions are used in pairs. The most common pairs are either ... or, both ... and, neither ... nor, and not only ... but (also).

They could either continue searching or go to the police.

Both Clara and Jeanette graduated from Stanford.

He could neither sing nor dance.

Not only the money but also the jewelry had been found.

Some adverbs, such as afterwards, consequently, for example, however, nonetheless, and therefore, act like conjunctions by linking either two main clauses separated by a semicolon, or two separate sentences. They express some effect that the first clause or sentence has on the second one.

They didn't agree; however, each understood the other's opinion.

We'll probably regret it; still, we really have no choice.

The team has won its last three games. Thus, its record for the year is now 15-12.

Examples of conjunction in a Sentence

Some common conjunctions are “and,” “but,” and “although.” the conjunction of the two major highways creates a massive influx of cars into the city
Recent Examples on the Web As for Brainard Road, the city is working in conjunction with the City of Highland Heights, Cuyahoga County and the federal government on a project costing about $3 million. cleveland, "Haverston, Brainard roads among Lyndhurst streets expected to see work in 2020," 17 Feb. 2020 Several documentaries about Parkland have been produced and were released this week in conjunction with the anniversary. Elly Belle, refinery29.com, "Two Years After Parkland: What’s Changed & What You Can Do To Help," 16 Feb. 2020 Cincinnati Enquirer The Kentucky Lions Eye Foundation, in conjunction with the Kentucky Association of Basketball Coaches, has named their finalists for Mr. Basketball and Miss Basketball to honor the best seniors in the commonwealth. James Weber, Cincinnati.com, "Which Northern Kentucky athletes are among Mr. and Miss Kentucky Basketball finalists?," 14 Feb. 2020 Pilots can expect airspace restrictions in conjunction with the VIP movement. Los Angeles Times, "Trump appears likely to attend Daytona 500," 12 Feb. 2020 Now, Karen Community of Louisville, in conjunction with the family's congregation, Beechland Karen Baptist Church, is trying to raise money for the mother and younger son's funeral. Ben Tobin, The Courier-Journal, "GoFundMe page set up to cover funeral costs of victims of Douglas Park apartment fire," 11 Feb. 2020 An aspect Colorado got right early on, Freedman said, was a tiered cultivation and production management system that forced companies to grow wisely in conjunction with demand. Alicia Wallace, CNN, "So you want to legalize cannabis? Some dos and don'ts from the experts," 10 Feb. 2020 Also on Saturday, Feb. 15, Migration Brewing is celebrating its 10-year anniversary in conjunction with Zwickelmania. oregonlive, "Oregon beer this week: Craft beer month rolls on with Function PDX showcase, Zwickelmania," 7 Feb. 2020 An official announcement at the end of 2018 said regional government funds would be used to construct a poverty-alleviation workshop in conjunction with the training center. Philip Wen, WSJ, "‘Admit Your Mistakes, Repent’: China Shifts Campaign to Control Xinjiang’s Muslims," 6 Feb. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'conjunction.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of conjunction

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for conjunction

see conjunct entry 1

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Time Traveler for conjunction

Time Traveler

The first known use of conjunction was in the 14th century

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Statistics for conjunction

Last Updated

24 Feb 2020

Cite this Entry

“Conjunction.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/conjunction. Accessed 29 Feb. 2020.

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More Definitions for conjunction

conjunction

noun
How to pronounce conjunction (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of conjunction

grammar : a word that joins together sentences, clauses, phrases, or words
formal : a situation in which two or more things happen at the same time or in the same place

conjunction

noun
con·​junc·​tion | \ kən-ˈjəŋk-shən How to pronounce conjunction (audio) \

Kids Definition of conjunction

1 : a joining together : union
2 : a word or expression that joins together sentences, clauses, phrases, or words

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Comments on conjunction

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