concurrent

adjective

con·​cur·​rent kən-ˈkər-ənt How to pronounce concurrent (audio)
-ˈkə-rənt,
kän-
1
: operating or occurring at the same time
2
a
: running parallel
b
: convergent
specifically : meeting or intersecting in a point
3
: acting in conjunction
4
: exercised over the same matter or area by two different authorities
concurrent jurisdiction
concurrent noun
concurrently adverb

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Concurrent and Consecutive

Consecutive has a good deal in common with the complementary word concurrent. Besides the fact that both begin with the prefix con- (meaning “with, together”), each word deals with the time-order in which several things happen. Concurrent describes things that are occurring, or people who are doing something, at the same time, such as “concurrent users” of a computer program. Consecutive refers to things that are arranged or happen in a sequential order. A criminal who serves a consecutive sentence does time for one conviction after another. If that person gets a concurrent sentence, he or she undergoes all punishments at the same time.

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What Does concurrent Really Mean?

Things that are concurrent usually not only happen at the same time but also are similar to each other. So, for example, multitasking computers are capable of performing concurrent tasks. When we take more than one medication at a time, we run the risks involved with concurrent drug use. And at any multiplex theater several movies are running concurrently.

Examples of concurrent in a Sentence

… the last two Mysore Wars in the 1790s, like the concurrent European wars against Revolutionary France, demonstrated Britain's capacity to reassert and reconfigure itself in the wake of crushing global defeats. Linda Colley, Captives, 2002
Concurrent with the party conventions, an assortment of activists, professional pols and show-biz celebrities with populist pretensions … will gather for four days of speechifying, seminar giving and satirical merrymaking … Andrew Ferguson, Time, 31 July 2000
Added to other evidence, this led to Cooke's conviction and a sentence of two concurrent twenty-year terms. David Fisher, Hard Evidence, 1995
the concurrent use of two medications He's currently serving two concurrent life sentences for murder.
Recent Examples on the Web In a concurrent private placement, the Company issued 11,288,122 unregistered warrants with an exercise price of $0.609 per warrant share. Miami Herald, 8 Feb. 2024 The deadline for the concurrent administrative investigation into the racist texts is fast approaching — if no decision is made by March, none of the involved officers will face discipline. Nate Gartrell, The Mercury News, 6 Feb. 2024 The game peaked with 5.7 million concurrent devices using Peacock, the company said, the most ever for the service. John Koblin, New York Times, 11 Jan. 2024 According to the report, U.S. emissions fell by 1.9% year on year while the economy grew by 2.4% — the first time the U.S. has seen a concurrent drop in emissions and economic growth since before the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Breanne Deppisch, Washington Examiner, 10 Jan. 2024 According to Twitch, 186 thousand streamers went live in the Fortnite category during the event, which had the highest concurrent viewership for any event in the gaming category in the platform’s history. Katcy Stephan, Variety, 11 Dec. 2023 Years ago, a sage Silicon Valley real estate attorney told me about these cases of home sellers entering two concurrent contracts for the sale of the property. Pat Kapowich, The Mercury News, 27 Jan. 2024 Directed by Vincent Maël Cardona, the now-shooting film begins with the discovery — and then the loss — of a winning lottery ticket before fracturing off into concurrent timelines. Ben Croll, Variety, 23 Jan. 2024 Hot on the heels of last Sunday’s Golden Globes, the rescheduled 2023 Emmys — which usually take place in September but were pushed because of the concurrent Writers Guild of America and SAG-AFTRA strikes last year — took place Monday evening in Los Angeles. Washington Post, 16 Jan. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'concurrent.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English concurant, concurrent, borrowed from Latin concurrent-, concurrens, present participle of concurrere "to assemble in haste, resort to in large numbers, collide, exist simultaneously, be in agreement" — more at concur

First Known Use

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of concurrent was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near concurrent

Cite this Entry

“Concurrent.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/concurrent. Accessed 24 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

concurrent

adjective
con·​cur·​rent kən-ˈkər-ənt How to pronounce concurrent (audio)
-ˈkə-rənt,
kän-
1
: operating or occurring at the same time
concurrent expeditions to the Antarctic region
2
: coming together : meeting in a point
concurrent lines
3
: acting together
concurrently adverb

Legal Definition

concurrent

adjective
con·​cur·​rent kən-ˈkər-ənt How to pronounce concurrent (audio)
1
: occurring, arising, or operating at the same time often in relationship, conjunction, association, or cooperation
the power of taxation in the general and state governments is acknowledged to be concurrentMcCulloch v. Maryland, 17 U.S. 316 (1819)
a concurrent tortious act
see also concurrent cause at cause, concurrent sentence at sentence
2
: insuring the same property to the same extent under identical terms
concurrent fire policies
3
: exercised over the same matter or area by two different authorities see also concurrent jurisdiction at jurisdiction, concurrent power at power sense 2a
concurrently adverb

More from Merriam-Webster on concurrent

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