current

adjective
cur·​rent | \ ˈkər-ənt How to pronounce current (audio) , ˈkə-rənt\

Definition of current

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a archaic : running, flowing
b(1) : presently elapsing the current year
(2) : occurring in or existing at the present time the current crisis current supplies current needs
(3) : most recent the magazine's current issue the current survey
2 : used as a medium of exchange
3 : generally accepted, used, practiced, or prevalent at the moment current fashions current ideas about education

current

noun

Definition of current (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : the part of a fluid body (such as air or water) moving continuously in a certain direction
b : the swiftest part of a stream
c : a tidal or nontidal movement of lake or ocean water
d : flow marked by force or strength
2a : a tendency or course of events that is usually the result of an interplay of forces currents of public opinion
b : a prevailing mood : strain
3 : a flow of electric charge also : the rate of such flow

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from current

Adjective

currently adverb
currentness noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for current

Synonyms: Adjective

conventional, customary, going, popular, prevailing, prevalent, standard, stock, usual

Synonyms: Noun

direction, drift, leaning, run, tendency, tide, trend, wind

Antonyms: Adjective

nonstandard, unconventional, unpopular, unusual

Visit the Thesaurus for More 

Choose the Right Synonym for current

Noun

tendency, trend, drift, tenor, current mean movement in a particular direction. tendency implies an inclination sometimes amounting to an impelling force. a general tendency toward inflation trend applies to the general direction maintained by a winding or irregular course. the long-term trend of the stock market is upward drift may apply to a tendency determined by external forces the drift of the population away from large cities or it may apply to an underlying or obscure trend of meaning or discourse. got the drift of her argument tenor stresses a clearly perceptible direction and a continuous, undeviating course. the tenor of the times current implies a clearly defined but not necessarily unalterable course. an encounter that changed the current of my life

Examples of current in a Sentence

Adjective

The dictionary's current edition has 10,000 new words. Who is your current employer? We need to keep current with the latest information.

Noun

Strong currents pulled the swimmer out to sea. Air currents carried the balloon for miles. The circuit supplies current to the saw.
See More

Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

Lauren O'Connell, a contestant on the current Survivor: Edge of Extinction series, fainted during a challenge. Blair Donovan, Country Living, "'Survivor' Sparks Controversy for the Show's Reaction to Lauren O'Connell's Scary Fall," 4 Apr. 2019 Sheikha Al Mayassa bint Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, the current chairperson of Qatar Museums and Sheikh Hamad’s daughter, has said. Julie Lasky, ELLE Decor, "ED First Look: The National Museum of Qatar," 26 Mar. 2019 In at least 54 percent of the mass shootings between 2009 and 2017, the perpetrator also shot a current or former intimate partner or family member. Shannon Watts, Vogue, "Toxic Masculinity Is Killing Us," 31 Jan. 2019 But current and former Googlers have been riled by the revelations in Gallagher’s report. Casey Newton, The Verge, "A looming strike over Project Dragonfly is putting new pressure on Google," 30 Nov. 2018 The current situation arises out of multi-year racial trauma our students have experienced while at school. Jameelah Nasheed, Teen Vogue, "How Students of Color Matter are Protesting Racism at Ethical Culture Fieldston School," 14 Mar. 2019 The plan came about after consulting with Democratic politicians, strategists and activists, including former and current advisers to Secretary Clinton and Senator Sanders, as well as potential media partners, according to the DNC. Amanda Mitchell, Marie Claire, "When Are the Democratic Presidential Debates? 2020 Is Coming Up Fast," 8 Feb. 2019 Be sure to include your name, location, contact info, occupation, a recent photo, links to your social media accounts, a short description about your current situation, and your budget for renovation. Maya Mcdowell, House Beautiful, "HGTV's New Show 'Unspouse My House' Will Help People Redecorate After A Breakup," 6 Feb. 2019 The book identifies four warning signs for leaders who might be willing to conduct power grabs and applies them to America’s current political situation. Zack Beauchamp, Vox, "The 9 thinkers who made sense of 2018’s chaos," 27 Dec. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

What was crystal clear to everybody who saw the collection were the currents of inclusivity and positivity that ran through it, with men’s and women’s looks reflecting each other. Giacomo Minazzi, Vogue, "Salvatore Ferragamo Hosts a Famiglia-Style Dinner in Milano," 24 Feb. 2019 Favorite fishing spots would have been the river’s whirlpools, where the currents confused the animals and made them easy prey — and a protein-rich staple. Mark Barna, Discover Magazine, "When Farmers and Foragers First Met," 24 Oct. 2018 The company expects same-store sales growth to hit 2.5% during its current fiscal year, implying a stronger growth rate in Darden’s current and final quarter. Micah Maidenberg, WSJ, "Darden Says Diners Are Trading Up, Thanks to Strong Labor Market," 18 Dec. 2018 The National Science Foundation project seeks to understand the movement of plankton and fish as a result of currents and eddies. Jennifer Van Grove, sandiegouniontribune.com, "Coast Guard icebreaker stops in San Diego before Arctic mission," 24 June 2018 Peter James, a corporate pilot with 25 years of experience per his Twitter bio, remarked at the plane's pace in astonishment on Twitter: Jet streams are essentially rivers or currents of air that travel west to east across the planet. Sam Blum, Popular Mechanics, "Virgin Flight Reaches 801 MPH as Furious Jet Stream Propels Plane Faster Than Speed of Sound," 19 Feb. 2019 The first test was a 400-yard swim — 200 with the current of the Weeki Wachee River, and 200 against. Sarah Scoles, Washington Post, "These ‘mermaids’ dance underwater for half an hour at a time," 17 June 2018 But as the killer’s current confessions show, a much darker current of violence ran beneath his official criminal record. Kyle Swenson, The Seattle Times, "Elderly prisoner claims he’s America’s deadliest serial killer with 90 victims. Police believe him.," 20 Nov. 2018 Clearly, there are strong currents of popular discontent in both countries that conventional polling techniques do not capture fully. Arthur I. Cyr, Lake County News-Sun, "Cyr: Britain’s prime minister takes charge of cabinet," 13 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'current.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of current

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for current

Adjective

Latininization of Middle English corrant, curraunt, borrowed from Anglo-French curant, corant, present participle of coure, courir "to run, flow," going back to Latin currere "to run, roll, move swiftly, flow," going back to Indo-European *kr̥s-e- "run," whence also Greek epíkouros "helping, helper" (from *epíkorsos "running toward," with o-grade ablaut), Old Irish carr "cart, wagon," Welsh car "vehicle" (from Celtic *kr̥s-o-), and perhaps Germanic *hursa- horse entry 1

Note: The Indo-European base has generally been taken as a primary verb, though Latin is the only language in which it is so attested.

Noun

Latinization of Middle English curraunt, borrowed from Middle French courant, going back to Old French, noun derivative from corant, curant, present participle of coure, courir "to run, flow" — more at current entry 1

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about current

Statistics for current

Last Updated

8 Apr 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for current

The first known use of current was in the 14th century

See more words from the same century

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for current

current

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of current

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: happening or existing now : belonging to or existing in the present time
chiefly US : aware of what is happening in a particular area of activity

current

noun

English Language Learners Definition of current (Entry 2 of 2)

: a continuous movement of water or air in the same direction
: a flow of electricity
formal : an idea, feeling, opinion, etc., that is shared by many or most of the people in a group

current

adjective
cur·​rent | \ ˈkər-ənt How to pronounce current (audio) \

Kids Definition of current

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : now passing the current month
2 : occurring in or belonging to the present time current events
3 : generally and widely accepted, used, or practiced current customs

current

noun

Kids Definition of current (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a body of fluid (as air or water) moving in a specified direction
2 : the swiftest part of a stream
3 : the general course : trend
4 : a flow of electricity

current

noun
cur·​rent | \ ˈkər-ənt, ˈkə-rənt How to pronounce current (audio) \

Medical Definition of current

1 : the part of a fluid body (as air or water) moving continuously in a certain direction
2 : a flow of electric charge also : the rate of such flow

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on current

What made you want to look up current? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

marked by a state of overwhelming emotion

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Words from Greek and Latin Quiz

  • roman forum
  • Which of the following months comes from a Latin word for “ten”?
True or False

Test your knowledge - and maybe learn something along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Bee Cubed

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!