tide

noun
\ ˈtīd \

Definition of tide

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1a(1) : the alternate rising and falling of the surface of the ocean and of water bodies (such as gulfs and bays) connected with the ocean that occurs usually twice a day and is the result of differing gravitational forces exerted at different parts of the earth by another body (such as the moon or sun)
(2) : a less marked rising and falling of an inland body of water
(3) : a periodic movement in the earth's crust caused by the same forces that produce ocean tides
(4) : a periodic distortion on one celestial body caused by the gravitational attraction of another
(5) : one of the periodic movements of the atmosphere resembling those of the ocean and produced by gravitation or diurnal temperature changes
2a : something that fluctuates like the tides of the sea the tide of public opinion
b : a large and increasing quantity or volume a tide of opportunists a swelling tide of criticism
3a : a flowing stream : current
b : the waters of the ocean
c : the overflow of a flooding stream
4a : a fit or opportune time : opportunity
b : an ecclesiastical anniversary or festival also : its season usually used in combination Eastertide
c obsolete : a space of time : period

tide

verb (1)
tided; tiding

Definition of tide (Entry 2 of 3)

intransitive verb

: to flow as or in a tide : surge

transitive verb

: to cause to float with or as if with the tide

tide

verb (2)
tided; tiding

Definition of tide (Entry 3 of 3)

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Other Words from tide

Noun

tideless \ ˈtīd-​ləs \ adjective

Examples of tide in a Sentence

Noun

a chart of the tides The boat got swept away in the tide.

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

This temporary rising tide lifted some boats — beneficiaries of corporate stock buybacks — more than others. Jon Talton, The Seattle Times, "So far, economy’s Big Mo’ can’t be stopped by scandal or bad policies," 5 Feb. 2019 For decades, the leaders of both parties preached the gospel that free trade was a rising tide that would lift all boats. Matthew Yglesias, Vox, "Elizabeth Warren wants to outflank Trump on trade," 29 Nov. 2018 To fight the rising tide of populism, mainstream leaders need to raise their ethical game. Caroline Hallemann, Town & Country, "Here's What Barack Obama Is Doing Now," 16 July 2018 The damage, Edelman says, was masked by the rising tide of the late-’90s boom, which lifted all boats and led to record-low poverty rates. Neil Swidey, BostonGlobe.com, "How Democrats would be better off if Bill Clinton had never been president," 10 July 2018 The rising tide of lawsuits by car windshield replacement companies against auto insurers has apparently crested — a result, plaintiff’s attorneys say, of pricing truces between insurers and independent glass shops. Ron Hurtibise, Sun-Sentinel.com, "Windshield lawsuits drop statewide; now barely a blip in South Florida," 6 July 2018 For the first time, two U.S. states will require schools to provide mental health education in a bid to combat a rising tide of depression and psychological hurdles facing American youth. Sy Mukherjee, Fortune, "New York and Virginia Become the First States to Require Mental Health Education in Schools," 4 July 2018 To Sharp, a national championship team would be a rising tide that could lift up the entire university. Andy Staples, SI.com, "The Message Behind the Money: How Texas A&M Landed Jimbo Fisher," 28 June 2018 While many of these are, indeed, scary prospects, her most vexing fear — with much justification — is the rising tide of protectionism. Steven Rattner, New York Times, "Dambisa Moyo’s Proposals for Saving Democracy," 7 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Nutrition: Bring enough food to tide you over on your hike, plus extra snacks in case you are unexpectedly delayed on your return. Crystal Paul, The Seattle Times, "Expert tips and 10 essentials for staying safe in the wilderness," 21 Aug. 2018 To tide us over until our TV screens are once again graced by the Reagan family, CBS released a brand new trailer for the upcoming episodes. Jennifer Aldrich, Country Living, "The New 'Blue Bloods' Trailer for Season 9 Is Here and It's So Intense," 26 Sep. 2018 Here are three recent innovations to tide us over until Bose reinvents suspension entirely. Ezra Dyer, Popular Mechanics, "3 Technologies That Are Making Car Suspensions Smarter Than Ever," 31 Jan. 2017 But on the bright side, Ari just released a three-and-a-half-minute behind-the-scenes look at the filming of the video to tide you over until then. Abby Gardner, Glamour, "Ariana Grande Just Shared Behind-the-Scenes Footage From Her 'Thank U, Next' Video," 29 Nov. 2018 And if the new trailer is any indication, there’s plenty of juicy plot lines (and steamy love scenes for Meredith!) to tide us over until Callie’s ready to scrub in again. Megan Stein, Country Living, "'Grey's Anatomy' Star Sara Ramirez Says She's Open to a Callie Return and Fans Are Freaking Out," 27 Sep. 2018 Faced with a similar cash crunch years ago, Vazquez had resorted to a payday loan, a high-interest, short term loan meant to tide a borrower over until the next paycheck. Fox News, "A lifeline for workers who face hardship between paychecks," 6 Aug. 2018 Faced with a similar cash crunch years ago, Vazquez had resorted to a payday loan, a high-interest, short-term loan meant to tide a borrower over until the next paycheck. Alexandra Olson, The Seattle Times, "Companies provide lifeline for workers who face hardship between paychecks," 6 Aug. 2018 The first two books, scheduled for this fall, will hopefully tide fans over until Season 3 of the series returns. Mary Cadden, USA TODAY, "'Stranger Things' prequel in the works," 11 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'tide.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of tide

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 4c

Verb (1)

1593, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

Verb (2)

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for tide

Noun

Middle English, time, from Old English tīd; akin to Old High German zīt time and perhaps to Greek daiesthai to divide

Verb (2)

Middle English, from Old English tīdan; akin to Middle Dutch tiden to go, come, Old English tīd time

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Statistics for tide

Last Updated

12 Feb 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for tide

The first known use of tide was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for tide

tide

noun

English Language Learners Definition of tide

: the regular upward and downward movement of the level of the ocean that is caused by the pull of the Sun and the Moon on the Earth
: the flow of the ocean's water as the tide rises or falls
: the way in which something is changing or developing

tide

noun
\ ˈtīd \

Kids Definition of tide

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the rising and falling of the surface of the ocean caused twice daily by the attraction of the sun and the moon
2 : something that rises and falls or rushes in a mass The tide of public opinion often changes.

tide

verb
tided; tiding

Kids Definition of tide (Entry 2 of 2)

: to help to overcome or put up with a difficulty A snack will tide me over until dinner.

tide

noun
\ ˈtīd \

Medical Definition of tide

: a temporary increase or decrease in a specified substance or quality in the body or one of its systems a postprandial alkaline tide, the typical rise in urinary pH associated with gastric acid secretion— E. J. Jacobson & Gerhard Fuchs

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More from Merriam-Webster on tide

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with tide

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for tide

Spanish Central: Translation of tide

Nglish: Translation of tide for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of tide for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about tide

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