card

1 of 5

noun (1)

1
2
cards plural in form but singular or plural in construction
a
: a game played with cards
b
: card playing
3
a
: something (such as an advantage) compared to a valuable playing card in one's hand
holding all the cards in negotiations
b
: an issue especially with emotional appeal that is brought into play to achieve a desired end (such as winning a political campaign)
played the race card
4
a
: greeting card
a birthday card
b
: a flat stiff usually small and rectangular piece of material (such as paper, cardboard, or plastic) usually bearing information: such as
(1)
(2)
(4)
: one bearing a picture (as of a baseball player) on one side and usually statistical data on the other
(5)
: one on which computer information is stored (as in the form of punched holes or magnetic encoding)
(6)
: one bearing electronic circuit components for insertion into a larger electronic device (such as a computer)
c
: program
especially : a sports program
three fights on the card
d(1)
: a wine list
(2)
: menu
5
informal + old-fashioned : a usually clownishly amusing person : wag
He's such a card!
6

card

2 of 5

verb (1)

carded; carding; cards

transitive verb

1
: to ask for identification (as in a bar)
We all got carded.
2
: score
a golfer carding a 75
3
: to place or fasten on or by means of a card
4
: to provide with a card
5
: to list or record on a card

card

3 of 5

verb (2)

carded; carding; cards

transitive verb

: to cleanse, disentangle, and collect together (fibers) by the use of cards preparatory to spinning
carder noun

card

4 of 5

noun (2)

1
: an instrument or machine for carding fibers that consists usually of bent wire teeth set closely in rows in a thick piece of leather fastened to a back
2
: an implement for raising a nap on cloth

card

5 of 5

abbreviation

Phrases
in the cards or less commonly on the cards
: inevitable
success just wasn't in the cards for her

Examples of card in a Sentence

Noun (1) the diners asked if there were any specials on the card for the evening you're really a card, but save the jokes for after class
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
Kyle Westmoreland, who carded a 4-under 68 on Saturday, was alone in second place at 14-under par. The Kansas City Star, Kansas City Star, 18 May 2024 The Lancers made the history by carding an even-par 360 for a top-four finish at the SCGA Regional Qualifier Tournament at Temecula Creek Inn Golf Course in Temecula. Dan Albano, Orange County Register, 16 May 2024 Scheffler’s ascent coincided with his playing partner plummeting in a tailspin, as Morikawa took two attempts to escape a bunker at the ninth before splashing a shot into the water two holes later to card two double bogeys in a matter of minutes. Jack Bantock, CNN, 14 Apr. 2024 Police identified the woman using her rewards card information and court records, the TV station said. Jonathan Limehouse, USA TODAY, 11 Mar. 2024 There was no mention of whether the attendant making the sale did any kind of double-take after carding her and getting a gander of the most famous driver’s license in the history of pop culture. Chris Willman, Variety, 25 Feb. 2024 Five players were tied at 14 under with seven holes to play, but Matsuyama finished with a flourish, carding three birdies on his last four holes to get to 9 under on the day and -17 for the week. Steve Galluzzo, Los Angeles Times, 18 Feb. 2024 Even without the stormy winds that buffeted Augusta on Saturday, its rolling course still proved notoriously challenging as, of the leaders, only Collin Morikawa carded a score under 70 – his 69 taking him to six under for the tournament and second place, a shot behind Scheffler. Issy Ronald, CNN, 14 Apr. 2024 Scheffler carded a double-bogey and fell down the leaderboard. Jordan Kaye, Charlotte Observer, 14 Apr. 2024
Noun
The unidentified driver, who had a valid border crossing card, was turned over to the custody of Homeland Security for further investigation. Kerry Breen, CBS News, 23 May 2024 Visa last week announced major changes to how credit and debit cards will operate in the U.S., meaning Americans will be carrying fewer physical cards in their wallets, and the 16-digit credit or debit card number printed on every card will become increasingly irrelevant. Ken Sweet, Fortune, 22 May 2024 The deck has 78 cards and a 128-page booklet with instructions and additional guidance. Lizz Schumer, Peoplemag, 22 May 2024 To pay, riders can either select the Navigo pass from their Apple Wallet and double-click the side button, or enable Express Mode and hold their iPhone or Apple Watch near a card reader. Alison Fox, Travel + Leisure, 21 May 2024 Ethnicities are no longer on ID cards and are not publicly discussed. Tinbete Ermyas, NPR, 20 May 2024 See, Magic decks aren’t fixed; new cards are released all the time. Longreads, 17 May 2024 That needs to be the final moment before those end cards. TIME, 17 May 2024 This wallet comes in 22 different colors and finished, each containing the capacity to hold up to 15 cards with the traditional spot to tuck cash or other valuable. Kelsey Chapman, ABC News, 10 May 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'card.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun (1)

Middle English carde, from Anglo-French, alteration of Middle French carte, probably from Old Italian carta, literally, leaf of paper, from Latin charta leaf of papyrus, from Greek chartēs

Noun (2)

Middle English carde, from Medieval Latin cardus, carduus, thistle, carding instrument, from Latin carduus thistle — more at chard

First Known Use

Noun (1)

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb (1)

1861, in the meaning defined at sense 3

Verb (2)

14th century, in the meaning defined above

Noun (2)

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of card was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near card

Cite this Entry

“Card.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/card. Accessed 27 May. 2024.

Kids Definition

card

1 of 4 verb
: to clean and untangle fibers by combing with a card before spinning
carder noun

card

2 of 4 noun
: an instrument usually having bent wire teeth for combing fibers (as wool or cotton)

card

3 of 4 noun
1
2
plural
a
: a game played with cards
b
: card playing
3
informal : an amusing person : wag
used especially in the past
4
: a flat stiff usually small and rectangular piece of paper, thin cardboard, or plastic: as
a
b
: such a card on which computer information is stored
5
: a sports program
6
: a removable circuit board (as in a personal computer)

card

4 of 4 verb
1
: to provide with a card
2
: to ask for identification
Etymology

Noun

Middle English carde "instrument for combing fibers," from Latin cardus, carduus "instrument for combing fibers, thistle," from earlier Latin carduus "thistle"

Noun

Middle English carde "playing card," from early French carte (same meaning), probably from early Italian carta, literally, "leaf of paper," from Latin charta "piece of papyrus" — related to carton, cartoon, chart

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