assent

verb
as·sent | \ ə-ˈsent , a- \
assented; assenting; assents

Definition of assent 

(Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to agree to or approve of something (such as an idea or suggestion) especially after thoughtful consideration : concur assent to a proposal

assent

noun
as·sent | \ ə-ˈsent , a- \

Definition of assent (Entry 2 of 2)

: an act of agreeing to something especially after thoughtful consideration : an act of assenting : acquiescence, agreement She gave her assent to the proposal.

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Other words from assent

Verb

assentor or assenter \-ˈsen-tər \ noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for assent

Synonyms: Verb

accede, acquiesce, agree, come round, consent, subscribe

Antonyms: Verb

dissent

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Choose the Right Synonym for assent

Verb

assent, consent, accede, acquiesce, agree, subscribe mean to concur with what has been proposed. assent implies an act involving the understanding or judgment and applies to propositions or opinions. voters assented to the proposal consent involves the will or feelings and indicates compliance with what is requested or desired. consented to their daughter's going accede implies a yielding, often under pressure, of assent or consent. officials acceded to the prisoners' demands acquiesce implies tacit acceptance or forbearance of opposition. acquiesced to his boss's wishes agree sometimes implies previous difference of opinion or attempts at persuasion. finally agreed to come along subscribe implies not only consent or assent but hearty approval and active support. subscribes wholeheartedly to the idea

Examples of assent in a Sentence

Verb

One day I arrived at class to discuss some abolition treaties written during the early Romantic period. An African American woman, Stephanie, was introduced to me by one of my students. Stephanie asked if she could sit in on the class, and I of course assented. —Laura Mandell, Profession, 1997 Christopher, on his end, is supposed to have assented to and even welcomed this public confirmation of his own negligibility, not that foreign diplomats needed any. —Tom Carson, Village Voice, 19 July 1994 Fearing that without a new batch of social measures the country would slip away from him, Roosevelt assented—sometimes rather grudgingly—to proposals that in sum make up the semi-welfare state under which we have lived this past half century. —Irving Howe, New York Times Book Review, 28 Sept.1986 The general proposed a detailed plan and the President assented. are we to conclude from your silence that you assent?

Noun

Cornel West of Harvard introduced Bradley as "my brother, my comrade." Then Bradley, donning drugstore reading glasses, standing motionless at the podium, took the air out of the cavernous hall with a lecture on the history of racism and the complexity of ethnic subcultures. He got nods of knowing assent, but he could have had a standing O. —Howard Fineman, Newsweek, 19 July 1999 Appointments at top universities often required the recommendation and assent of experts from other fields; insofar as deans, provosts, and other administrators came from economics and the hard sciences, many of them recognized rational choice as something close to their own ideals of legitimate scientific research. —Jonathan Cohn, New Republic, 25 Oct. 1999 From The Second Sex to In a Different Voice, I could read and appreciate the analysis or the argument without feeling personally very involved. I could, and did, argue for feminism because I believed in much of what feminist writers were saying about gender equality, but my assent came from my head, not my heart. I knew that as an audience for feminist writers I was a pretty tertiary concern. —Robert J. Connors, College English, February 1996 Once filming began, sequences that had been axed for budgetary reasons were put back—with the studio's tacit assent. —Charles Fleming, Vanity Fair, August 1995
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

In any case, Morena and its allies do not yet control the legislatures of most of the 32 states; to change the constitution, a majority must assent. The Economist, "Mexico’s motley new congress," 5 July 2018 Children, who will have to assent to giving blood or saliva for genetic testing, need someone to explain what is happening to them and why their samples are required, Wolf adds—and older children should have the right to agree or reject testing. Karen Weintraub, Scientific American, "Genetic Testing to Reunite Immigrant Families Raises Issues of Privacy and Consent," 26 June 2018 The way Americans assent to such treatments fits more broadly into a culture of arduous self-improvement regimens. Gabriel Winant, The New Republic, "Barbara Ehrenreich’s radical critique of wellness and self-improvement," 23 May 2018 Miraculously, though, Pop assented, and Aldridge has not only been better this season—with Kawhi out, there was a vacuum to fill—but looked far more comfortable. Nathaniel Friedman, GQ, "The Silence Around Kawhi Leonard Used to Be Comforting," 18 Apr. 2018 The Washington Examiner’s Byron York cheerfully assented to Dobbs’s ravings. Jonathan Chait, Daily Intelligencer, "Democracy Has Survived a Year of Trump. But the Fight Isn’t Over.," 23 Jan. 2018 The president was prepared to stand by Mr. Scaramucci, but the new White House chief of staff, retired Gen. John Kelly, called for his ouster and Mr. Trump assented. Jason L. Riley, WSJ, "Trump’s White House Mess," 1 Aug. 2017 Pittman assented to an arrest warrant and set Singleton's bond at $100,000. Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com, "Can you identify this Harvey robbery suspect?," 21 Oct. 2017

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

For the 2018 season, with the tepid assent of the players’ union, M.L.B. issued a set of new rules designed to do just that. Susan Jacoby, Time, "Why the Worst Thing About Baseball Is Also the Best Thing About Baseball," 24 May 2018 Top White House officials, with the assent of [Trump], agreed to back the decision to withhold the information. James Hohmann, Washington Post, "The Daily 202: Primary results confirm 2018 is a terrible year to be a House Republican," 9 May 2018 The Turkish offensive, carried out over the protests of the United States but with the apparent assent of Russia, marks a perilous new phase in relations between two NATO allies — bringing their interests into direct conflict on the battlefield. Mark Landler And Carlotta Gall, New York Times, "As Turkey Attacks Kurds in Syria, U.S. Is on the Sideline," 22 Jan. 2018 If negotiations fail, the U.S. and its allies must move swiftly be to minimize the North Korean menace without Mr. Kim’s assent. Nicholas Eberstadt, WSJ, "With Kim Jong Un, There’s No ‘Win-Win’," 23 May 2018 The argument is that silence is essentially assent. Chris Cillizza, CNN, "The 11 most eye-opening lines in James Comey's 'A Higher Loyalty,' ranked," 13 Apr. 2018 In Moscow’s preferred scenario, Assad would regain control of the whole of Syria; his rule would receive international assent through United Nations peace talks; and the wealthy West would chip in to finance reconstruction. Bloomberg.com, "Putin Trio of Syria Winners Seen Accepting Partition for Now," 4 Apr. 2018 At any rate, the withdrawal deal must be signed by the end of the year to give time for Parliament to approve it, for EU national leaders to ratify it, and for the European parliament to give its assent by March 29, 2019. Peter Ford, The Christian Science Monitor, "As clock ticks down, Britain finally reveals its plan for Brexit. What now?," 11 July 2018 Such a tax will need to be approved by the Legislature, and this seems unlikely, particularly without Cuomo’s assent. William Finnegan, The New Yorker, "Can Andy Byford Save the Subways?," 2 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'assent.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of assent

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined above

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for assent

Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French assentir, assenter, from Latin assentari, from assentire, from ad- + sentire to feel — more at sense

Noun

see assent entry 1

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Time Traveler for assent

The first known use of assent was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for assent

assent

verb

English Language Learners Definition of assent

: to agree to or approve of something (such as an idea or suggestion) especially after carefully thinking about it

assent

verb
as·sent | \ ə-ˈsent \
assented; assenting

Kids Definition of assent

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to agree to or approve of something They refused to assent to the new rules.

assent

noun

Kids Definition of assent (Entry 2 of 2)

: an act of agreeing to or approving of something We mistakenly interpreted their handshake for assent.

as·sent | \ ə-ˈsent \

Legal Definition of assent 

(Entry 1 of 2)

: to agree to something especially freely and with understanding : give one's assent

assent

noun

Legal Definition of assent (Entry 2 of 2)

: agreement to a matter under consideration especially based on freedom of choice and a reasonable knowledge of the matter their mutual assent to the terms of the contract

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