assent

verb
as·​sent | \ ə-ˈsent How to pronounce assent (audio) , a-\
assented; assenting; assents

Definition of assent

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to agree to or approve of something (such as an idea or suggestion) especially after thoughtful consideration : concur assent to a proposal

assent

noun
as·​sent | \ ə-ˈsent How to pronounce assent (audio) , a-\

Definition of assent (Entry 2 of 2)

: an act of agreeing to something especially after thoughtful consideration : an act of assenting : acquiescence, agreement She gave her assent to the proposal.

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Other Words from assent

Verb

assentor or assenter \ -​ˈsen-​tər How to pronounce assenter (audio) \ noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for assent

Synonyms: Verb

accede, acquiesce, agree, come round, consent, subscribe

Antonyms: Verb

dissent

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Choose the Right Synonym for assent

Verb

assent, consent, accede, acquiesce, agree, subscribe mean to concur with what has been proposed. assent implies an act involving the understanding or judgment and applies to propositions or opinions. voters assented to the proposal consent involves the will or feelings and indicates compliance with what is requested or desired. consented to their daughter's going accede implies a yielding, often under pressure, of assent or consent. officials acceded to the prisoners' demands acquiesce implies tacit acceptance or forbearance of opposition. acquiesced to his boss's wishes agree sometimes implies previous difference of opinion or attempts at persuasion. finally agreed to come along subscribe implies not only consent or assent but hearty approval and active support. subscribes wholeheartedly to the idea

Examples of assent in a Sentence

Verb

One day I arrived at class to discuss some abolition treaties written during the early Romantic period. An African American woman, Stephanie, was introduced to me by one of my students. Stephanie asked if she could sit in on the class, and I of course assented. — Laura Mandell, Profession, 1997 Christopher, on his end, is supposed to have assented to and even welcomed this public confirmation of his own negligibility, not that foreign diplomats needed any. — Tom Carson, Village Voice, 19 July 1994 Fearing that without a new batch of social measures the country would slip away from him, Roosevelt assented—sometimes rather grudgingly—to proposals that in sum make up the semi-welfare state under which we have lived this past half century. — Irving Howe, New York Times Book Review, 28 Sept.1986 The general proposed a detailed plan and the President assented. are we to conclude from your silence that you assent?

Noun

Cornel West of Harvard introduced Bradley as "my brother, my comrade." Then Bradley, donning drugstore reading glasses, standing motionless at the podium, took the air out of the cavernous hall with a lecture on the history of racism and the complexity of ethnic subcultures. He got nods of knowing assent, but he could have had a standing O. — Howard Fineman, Newsweek, 19 July 1999 Appointments at top universities often required the recommendation and assent of experts from other fields; insofar as deans, provosts, and other administrators came from economics and the hard sciences, many of them recognized rational choice as something close to their own ideals of legitimate scientific research. — Jonathan Cohn, New Republic, 25 Oct. 1999 From The Second Sex to In a Different Voice, I could read and appreciate the analysis or the argument without feeling personally very involved. I could, and did, argue for feminism because I believed in much of what feminist writers were saying about gender equality, but my assent came from my head, not my heart. I knew that as an audience for feminist writers I was a pretty tertiary concern. — Robert J. Connors, College English, February 1996 Once filming began, sequences that had been axed for budgetary reasons were put back—with the studio's tacit assent. — Charles Fleming, Vanity Fair, August 1995
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

By the time the country reluctantly assented to some foreign assistance, the disaster had started to slip from the news. Kelsey Piper, Vox, "Why disaster relief is so hard," 25 Mar. 2019 By the time the country reluctantly assented to some foreign assistance, the disaster had started to slip from the news. Kelsey Piper, Vox, "Why disaster relief is so hard," 25 Mar. 2019 By the time the country reluctantly assented to some foreign assistance, the disaster had started to slip from the news. Kelsey Piper, Vox, "Why disaster relief is so hard," 25 Mar. 2019 By the time the country reluctantly assented to some foreign assistance, the disaster had started to slip from the news. Kelsey Piper, Vox, "Why disaster relief is so hard," 25 Mar. 2019 By the time the country reluctantly assented to some foreign assistance, the disaster had started to slip from the news. Kelsey Piper, Vox, "Why disaster relief is so hard," 25 Mar. 2019 But other European voters also have assented to the Lisbon Treaty, which contemplates exits such as the one Britain is attempting. Joseph C. Sternberg, WSJ, "A ‘No Deal’ Brexit Can Save the European Union," 17 Jan. 2019 By the time the country reluctantly assented to some foreign assistance, the disaster had started to slip from the news. Kelsey Piper, Vox, "Why disaster relief is so hard," 23 Nov. 2018 Five of the seven assenting justices carry baggage that strains their credibility. Mary Anastasia O’grady, WSJ, "A Cynical Trade With Colombia," 18 Nov. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

In some cases, this takes place with the senators’ unspoken assent. Matt Ford, The New Republic, "An Administration Run by Temp Workers," 19 June 2019 Two-thirds of lawmakers would have to assent to change the constitution. Arabile Gumede, Bloomberg.com, "Why Land Seizure Is Back in News in South Africa," 1 Mar. 2018 All laws, cabinet appointments and dissolution of parliament for general elections require his assent. Eileen Ng, The Seattle Times, "A look at Malaysia’s monarchy before sultans pick next king," 23 Jan. 2019 No reform will have a balanced effect across the parties, as the soft-money ban did, but changes to the fundamental rules of democracy have traditionally needed cross-partisan assent. Mark Schmitt, Vox, "John McCain’s signature campaign finance law was a real achievement — for its time," 26 Aug. 2018 Pro-Brexit lawmakers in the House of Commons cheered as Speaker John Bercow announced that the European Union Withdrawal Bill had received royal assent. Jill Lawless, BostonGlobe.com, "Key UK Brexit bill becomes law as car industry warns of harm," 26 June 2018 It is expected to receive royal assent sometime this week. Laignee Barron, Time, "Canada Has Just Passed a Landmark Bill Legalizing Recreational Marijuana," 20 June 2018 The process required fake purchase orders, coaches’ assents — and, crucially, middlemen like youth-league coaches, money managers and agents. Marc Tracy, New York Times, "Report Ties Players at Top College Basketball Programs to Illicit Payments," 23 Feb. 2018 In 1992, a law was passed requiring that any bill to raise taxes receive the assent of the governor and three-quarters of the legislature. Rivka Galchen, The New Yorker, "The Teachers’ Strike and the Democratic Revival in Oklahoma," 4 June 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'assent.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of assent

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined above

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for assent

Verb and Noun

Middle English, from Anglo-French assentir, assenter, from Latin assentari, from assentire, from ad- + sentire to feel — more at sense

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Statistics for assent

Last Updated

26 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for assent

The first known use of assent was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for assent

assent

verb

English Language Learners Definition of assent

formal : to agree to or approve of something (such as an idea or suggestion) especially after carefully thinking about it

assent

verb
as·​sent | \ ə-ˈsent How to pronounce assent (audio) \
assented; assenting

Kids Definition of assent

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to agree to or approve of something They refused to assent to the new rules.

assent

noun

Kids Definition of assent (Entry 2 of 2)

: an act of agreeing to or approving of something We mistakenly interpreted their handshake for assent.
as·​sent | \ ə-ˈsent How to pronounce assent (audio) \

Legal Definition of assent

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to agree to something especially freely and with understanding : give one's assent

assent

noun

Legal Definition of assent (Entry 2 of 2)

: agreement to a matter under consideration especially based on freedom of choice and a reasonable knowledge of the matter their mutual assent to the terms of the contract

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More from Merriam-Webster on assent

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with assent

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for assent

Spanish Central: Translation of assent

Nglish: Translation of assent for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of assent for Arabic Speakers

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